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Issue Details: First known date: 2010 2010
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The primary objectives of the essay collection are to emphasize, highlight, and examine the postcolonial nature of Australian literature. Within postcolonial studies, literature from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean is often privileged, causing the literature of settler societies such as Australia, Canada and New Zealand to be ignored. This collection provides ample evidence that Australian literature is indeed postcolonial literature, that it deserves more recognition as such, and that postcolonial reading strategies provide immensely fruitful methods for analyzing Australian texts. Moreover, the collection seeks to fill a gap in postcolonial studies.
Essay collections focusing on the postcolonial nature of national and regional literatures have previously been published; however, Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature is the first collection to focus exclusively on Australian literature as postcolonial literature and the first collection of essays on Australian literature in which all the contributors write from a postcolonial theoretical perspective. It is thus a groundbreaking work that makes an important contribution to both Australian literary studies and postcolonial studies.
Narrow definitions of "postcolonial" that exclude settler colonies such as Australia not only serve to marginalize rich bodies of literature and literary criticism, they also ignore and/or obscure the fact that there are many kinds of postcolonialism, many types of postcolonial societies, and many ways for texts to be postcolonial. Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature, as a body of work, insists that Australian literature is postcolonial literature and deserves equal status with the literature of other postcolonial nations' (Publisher website).

Notes

  • Dedication: For Tricia and Celeste

Contents

* Contents derived from the Youngstown, New York (State),
c
United States of America (USA),
c
Americas,
:
Cambria Press , 2010 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Reading Post-Colonial Australia, Bill Ashcroft , 2010 single work criticism (p. 15-37)
Jack Lindsay, Patrick White, and Postcolonial Medievalism, Nicholas Birns , 2010 single work criticism (p. 41-54)
The Postcolonial Perspective on an Regional Literature in Australia, Per Henningsgaard , 2010 single work criticism (p. 57-74)
‘Thick with Coded Testaments’ : Representations of Postcolonial Space in Janette Turner Hospital’s Oyster, Nicholas Dunlop , 2010 single work criticism (p. 75-92)
Spaces of Hybridity : Creating a Sense of Belonging through Spatial Awareness, Lesley Hawkes , 2010 single work criticism (p. 93-107)
The Unbearable (Im)Possibility of Belonging : Andrew McGahan’s The White Earth, Martina Horakova , 2010 single work criticism
This chapter explores ‘the ‘postcolonial uncertainty’ of settler belonging from the purely outsider’s perspective of someone who does not live in Australia but is nevertheless intrigued by the apparently disturbing dilemma of non-Indigenous Australians attempting to articulate a fulfilling relationship to their land.’ (p 110)
(p. 109-128)
The Sorry Novels : Peter Carey’s Oscar and Lucinda, Greg Matthews’ The Wisdom of Stones and Kate Grenville’s The Secret River, Rebecca Weaver-Hightower , 2010 single work criticism (p. 129-156)
Need I Repeat? : Settler Colonial Biopolitics and Postcolonial Iterability in Kim Scott’s Benang, Michael R. Griffiths , 2010 single work criticism (p. 157-183)
Negotiating Subjectivity : Indigenous Feminist Praxis and the Politics of Aboriginality in Alexis Wright’s Plains of Promise and Melissa Lucashenko’s Steam Pigs, Tomoko Ichitani , 2010 single work criticism (p. 185-202)
“[P]eople Often Judged by What They Feared or Knew Existed in Themselves” : A Postcolonial Critique of Disability in Elizabeth Jolley’s The Well, Kate Ellis , 2010 single work criticism (p. 203-218)
Revisiting Australia : Historical Fabrications, Telling Histories/Stories and Other Colonial Delusions in Peter Carey’s My Life as a Fake, Sarah Zapata , 2010 single work criticism (p. 219-236)
The Postcolonial Screen : Elaborate Forgeries in Rodney Hall’s The Second Bridegroom, Peter Mathews , 2010 single work criticism (p. 237-253)
Colonial Knowledge, Post-Colonial Poetics, Lyn McCredden , 2010 single work criticism (p. 255-277)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Youngstown, New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Cambria Press , 2010 .
      3637946983003724647.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 332p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 8 August 2010
      ISBN: 9781604977110

Works about this Work

The Transnational Fantasy : The Case of James Cowan Peter Matthews , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 67-73)
'Recent criticism has seen the rise of an approach to literature that views texts as products of 'transnationalism,' a move that arises from a growing sense that, in a global age, authors should not be bounded by the traditional limits of national culture. In her book Cosmopolitan Style: Modernism Beyond the Nation (2006), for instance, Rebecca Walkowitz looks at how this trend has evolved in world Anglophone literature, extending from canonical writers like Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, and Virginia Woolf to such contemporary authors as Salman Rushdie, Kazuo Ishiguro, and W.G. Sebald. In the field of Australian literature, the question of transnationalism is often linked to issues of postcolonialism, as reflected in recent critical works like Graham Huggan's Australian Literature: Postcolonialism, Racism, Transnationalism (2007) and Nathanael O'Reilly's edited collection Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature (2010), both of which examine how Australian literature and culture have metamorphosed in the new global context. While there is little doubt that world literature has been affected in important ways by this broadening of literary stage, there seems to be a widespread conflation between two similar but different terms: the transnational and transcultural. For while it is true that the culture of many countries arises from a cosmopolitan and diverse assortment of influences, this loosening of cultural boundaries between nations is far from being simultaneous with the decline of the state.' (Author's introduction)
Is Australia (still) Postcolonial (yet) Victoria Kuttainen , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 27 no. 2 2012; (p. 102-106)

— Review of Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010 anthology criticism
Review David Callahan , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 2 no. 1 2011; (p. 142-144)

— Review of Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010 anthology criticism
Untitled Susan Carson , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , November vol. 4 no. 1 2011;

— Review of Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010 anthology criticism
Untitled Jean-François Vernay , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Cercles 2000-;

— Review of Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010 anthology criticism
Review David Callahan , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 2 no. 1 2011; (p. 142-144)

— Review of Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010 anthology criticism
Untitled Susan Carson , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , November vol. 4 no. 1 2011;

— Review of Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010 anthology criticism
Untitled Jean-François Vernay , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Cercles 2000-;

— Review of Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010 anthology criticism
Is Australia (still) Postcolonial (yet) Victoria Kuttainen , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 27 no. 2 2012; (p. 102-106)

— Review of Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010 anthology criticism
The Transnational Fantasy : The Case of James Cowan Peter Matthews , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 67-73)
'Recent criticism has seen the rise of an approach to literature that views texts as products of 'transnationalism,' a move that arises from a growing sense that, in a global age, authors should not be bounded by the traditional limits of national culture. In her book Cosmopolitan Style: Modernism Beyond the Nation (2006), for instance, Rebecca Walkowitz looks at how this trend has evolved in world Anglophone literature, extending from canonical writers like Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, and Virginia Woolf to such contemporary authors as Salman Rushdie, Kazuo Ishiguro, and W.G. Sebald. In the field of Australian literature, the question of transnationalism is often linked to issues of postcolonialism, as reflected in recent critical works like Graham Huggan's Australian Literature: Postcolonialism, Racism, Transnationalism (2007) and Nathanael O'Reilly's edited collection Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature (2010), both of which examine how Australian literature and culture have metamorphosed in the new global context. While there is little doubt that world literature has been affected in important ways by this broadening of literary stage, there seems to be a widespread conflation between two similar but different terms: the transnational and transcultural. For while it is true that the culture of many countries arises from a cosmopolitan and diverse assortment of influences, this loosening of cultural boundaries between nations is far from being simultaneous with the decline of the state.' (Author's introduction)
Last amended 28 Aug 2015 08:37:14
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