4498170486125623600.jpg
This image has been sourced from Web.
4477375801389807237.jpg
Cover image courtesy Pan Macmillan
y That Deadman Dance single work   novel   historical fiction  
That Deadman Dance Issue Details: First known date: 2010... 2010
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Big-hearted, moving and richly rewarding, That Deadman Dance is set in the first decades of the 19th century in the area around what is now Albany, Western Australia. In playful, musical prose, the book explores the early contact between the Aboriginal Noongar people and the first European settlers.

'The novel's hero is a young Noongar man named Bobby Wabalanginy. Clever, resourceful and eager to please, Bobby befriends the new arrivals, joining them hunting whales, tilling the land, exploring the hinterland and establishing the fledgling colony. He is even welcomed into a prosperous local white family where he falls for the daughter, Christine, a beautiful young woman who sees no harm in a liaison with a native.

'But slowly - by design and by accident - things begin to change. Not everyone is happy with how the colony is developing. Stock mysteriously start to disappear; crops are destroyed; there are "accidents" and injuries on both sides. As the Europeans impose ever stricter rules and regulations in order to keep the peace, Bobby's Elders decide they must respond in kind. A friend to everyone, Bobby is forced to take sides: he must choose between the old world and the new, his ancestors and his new friends. Inexorably, he is drawn into a series of events that will forever change not just the colony but the future of Australia...' (From the publisher's website.)

Reading Australia

This work has Reading Australia teaching resources.

Bobby Wabalanginy never learned fear, not until he was pretty well a grown man. Sure, he grew up doing the Dead Man Dance, but with him it was a dance of life, a lively dance for people to do together…’

Told through the eyes of black and white, young and old, this is a story about a fledgling Western Australian community in the early 1800s known as the ‘friendly frontier’.

Poetic, warm-hearted and bold, it is a story which shows that first contact did not have to lead to war.

It is a story for our times.

Source: Publisher's Synopsis provided by Reading Australia

Notes

  • Dedication: To Reenie, For all these years.
  • Other formats: Also braille; sound recording, including MP3 by ABC and Bolinda publishing; large print
  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Bloomsbury ,
      2010 .
      4498170486125623600.jpg
      This image has been sourced from Web.
      Extent: 353p.
      Edition info: 1st U.S. ed.
      Reprinted: 2012
      ISBN: 9781608197057, 1608197050
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Picador , 2010 .
      Extent: 400p.
      Note/s:
      • Includes Author's Note pp.397-400
      ISBN: 9781405040440 (pbk), 9781405040433 (hbk)
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Pan Macmillan , 2011 .
      4477375801389807237.jpg
      Cover image courtesy Pan Macmillan
      Extent: 400p.
      Note/s:
      • Previously published 2010.
      ISBN: 9780330404235 (pbk)
    • Ultimo, Inner Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: Bolinda Audio Books , 2011 .
      Extent: 11 hrs, 4 minsp.
      Edition info: Unabridged.
      Description: 9 sound discs (CD)
      ISBN: 9781743101926, 9781742853482
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: ReadHowYouWant Pty Ltd , 2011 .
      Extent: viii, 420p.
      Description: illus., maps, large print.
      Note/s:
      • Originally published in Sydney, Picador, 2010.
      ISBN: 9781459623088 (large print)
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Picador , 2012 .
      Extent: 400p.
      Edition info: Picador 40 special ed.
      Note/s:
      • Publication date: 1 March 2012.
      • Previously published 2011.
      ISBN: 9781742611501 (pbk)
    • Ultimo, Inner Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: Bolinda Audio Books , 2012 .
      Extent: 11 hr, 4 minp.
      Description: 1 sound disc (MP3 CD)
      Note/s:
      • Unabridged.
      • Read by Humphrey Bower.
      ISBN: 9781743185155
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: ABC Audio , 2012 .
      Edition info: Unabridged ed.
      ISBN: 9781743112489

Works about this Work

Threshold : Reconfiguring the Past in That Deadman Dance Karen Atkinson , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , vol. 61 no. 1 2016; (p. 247-261)
Changes in Tone, Setting, and Publisher : Indigenous Literatures of Australia and New Zealand from the 1980s to Today Per Henningsgaard , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , May vol. 8 no. 2 2016;
'This article examines four novels written since 1980 by two Aboriginal Australian authors and two Maori authors. Two of the four novels were written near the beginning of this period and feature settings that are contemporary with their publication; The Day of the Dog by Aboriginal Australian author Archie Weller was published in 1981, while Once Were Warriors by Maori author Alan Duff was published in 1990. The other two novels (That Deadman Dance by Aboriginal Australian author Kim Scott and The Trowenna Sea by Maori author Witi Ihimaera) are works of historical fiction written in the last decade.' (Introduction)
For a Long Time Nothing Happened : Settler Colonialism, Deferred Action and the Scene of Colonization in Kim Scott’s That Deadman Dance Tony Hughes-d'Aeth , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Commonwealth Literature , vol. 51 no. 1 2016; (p. 22-34)
'That Deadman Dance (2010) is Kim Scott’s third novel and his second to win the premier literary prize in Australia, the Miles Franklin Award. Scott’s novel is set in the period of contact between European settlers and the Indigenous Noongar people on the south coast of Western Australia at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Scott’s father was Noongar and his writing is positioned in the interplay between cultures and histories. In this article, I argue that contact fiction is conditioned by the psychoanalytic principle of deferred action and use Scott’s novel to exemplify this argument.' (Publication abstract)
Shedding Clothes : Performing Cross-cultural Exchange through Costume and Writing in Kim Scott’s That Deadman Dance Maggie Nolan , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 75 no. 2 2016; (p. 124-144)
'Nolan examines how Scott's 'novel depicts the ways in which different systems of literacy and adornment become entangled in cross-cultural encounters'. (Editorial, 7)
Reading Kim Scott’s That Deadman Dance : Book Clubs and Postcolonial Literary Theory Maggie Nolan , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 16 no. 2 2016;
'This paper explores different readings of Kim Scott’s Miles Franklin award-winning novel That Deadman Dance, which offers a complex portrayal of cross-cultural contact on the so-called ‘Friendly Frontier’ of the southern coast of Western Australia in the early to mid-nineteenth century. This article contrasts academic responses to the novel with those of one of the most significant contemporary literary networks: book club readers. It draws upon Derek Attridge’s distinction between literal and allegorical readings, and Diana Fuss’s work on identification, to explore the extent to which different readers respond to the novel as an unfamiliar literary work in the context of literary sociability. I suggest that book club readings, in their tentative and open-ended uncertainty, pose a challenge to the orthodoxies of academic literary studies.' (Publication abstract)
Dancing in the Deep Diane Stubbings , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 25 September 2010; (p. 23)

— Review of That Deadman Dance Kim Scott 2010 single work novel
Narrative Retold from a Vital Vantage Point Stella Clarke , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 2-3 October 2010; (p. 23)

— Review of That Deadman Dance Kim Scott 2010 single work novel
Nothing Personal Patrick Allington , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 325 2010; (p. 11-12)

— Review of That Deadman Dance Kim Scott 2010 single work novel
Untitled Katharine England , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 16 October 2010; (p. 25)

— Review of That Deadman Dance Kim Scott 2010 single work novel
Untitled Toni Whitmont , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , October vol. 90 no. 3 2010; (p. 30)

— Review of That Deadman Dance Kim Scott 2010 single work novel
Open to Exchange Catherine Keenan , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 23 October 2010; (p. 26-27) The Sydney Morning Herald , 23-24 October 2010; (p. 34-35)
First Contact Toni Whitmont (interviewer), 2010 single work interview
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , October vol. 90 no. 3 2010; (p. 39)
New Book for Award-Winning Author Margaret Smith , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 17 November no. 489 2010; (p. 49)
Noongar Storyteller Stays True to His Roots with Prize-Winning Novel Susan Wyndham , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 3 March 2011; (p. 3) The Age , 3 March 2011; (p. 10)
Colonial Prize 'An Amusement' Stephen Romei , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 3 March 2011; (p. 8)
Last amended 30 Jan 2017 14:54:57
Settings:
  • Albany - Denmark - Mount Barker area, Far Southwest Western Australia, Western Australia,
  • 1800-1899
Explore:
9618660
10628823
10626492
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X