Issue Details: First known date: 2010 2010
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Geordie Williamson traces his own encounters with Australian literature - while living in England - and comes to an understanding of what Australia's national literature is 'good for': 'helping us define ourselves in relation to an Anglo past and American present, for example, or airing the wounds suffered by indigenous Australia, or inhabiting those new frictions that result from our expanding cultural pluralism. Above all, it could teach us to dwell more easily in a landscape that did not accord with the metaphors and myth-kitty that was our northern inheritance.'

From this launching point, Williamson sets himself the task of exploring the current state of Australian literary criticism and the devising of a national literary canon.

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Works about this Work

Itinerant Reading, Itinerant Writing : Teaching Australian Literature Contextually Ian Reid , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 16-30)
'Australian literature is like literature in general, only more so: what characterises all reading and writing is embodied with special intensity in this case. Why? Because when you read or write in an Australian context, your imagination is unavoidably and utterly itinerant.' (Author's introduction, 16)
Itinerant Reading, Itinerant Writing : Teaching Australian Literature Contextually Ian Reid , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 16-30)
'Australian literature is like literature in general, only more so: what characterises all reading and writing is embodied with special intensity in this case. Why? Because when you read or write in an Australian context, your imagination is unavoidably and utterly itinerant.' (Author's introduction, 16)
Last amended 8 Sep 2010 17:06:53
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