y Silence single work   drama  
Issue Details: First known date: 2010 2010
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Silence is about the secrets and spirits that haunt us from within. A family reunited by a death anniversary have to face the possessiveness of history and put the past to rest. A play for three Vietnamese women, Silence deals with the universal themes of war, betrayal, loss and love, and will feature bunraku puppetry.' (From the publisher's website.)

Production Details

  • Silence was first produced by La Mama at La Mama Courthouse, Carlton, on 11 November, 2009.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 2010
    • Strawberry Hills, Inner Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: Currency Press , 2010 .
      Extent: 23p.
      ISBN: 9780868198781 (pbk.)
      Series: Current Theatre Series Currency Press (publisher), 1983- series - publisher 'Current Theatre Series consists of Australian plays published with the program inserted and sold during theatre seasons. The aim of the series is to promote and encourage new dramatic writing and make it accessible to theatregoers and the public. The text is presented at the first day of rehearsal and does not contain changes which the author may choose to make after the play has commenced its present season - these will be incorporated into any new edition published by Currency.' Currency Press.

Works about this Work

From Gangs to Shopping Malls : Sentimental Aesthetics in Vietnamese Australian Community Arts Scott Brook , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Intercultural Studies , vol. 35 no. 3 2014; (p. 281-294)
'This article describes developments in Vietnamese Australian community arts in the context of recent reforms to Community Cultural Development (CCD) funding. While a discussion of two case studies suggests these reforms have encouraged a shift towards post-welfarist and enterprising modes of project development, the article argues that conspicuously ‘cosmo-multiculturalist’ and ‘sentimental aesthetics’ cannot be explained entirely in terms of post-1980s cultural policies of the Australian Labour government. The article concludes that recent attempts to link CCD work to professional arts networks were in fact anticipated by the explicit agendas of Vietnamese Australian CCD workers themselves, although for quite different purposes.' (Publication abstract)
Holding Their Peace after the War Martin Ball , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 22 May 2010; (p. 22)

— Review of Silence Hoa Pham 2010 single work drama
Keeping Body and Soul Together Robin Usher , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 21 May 2010; (p. 17)
Untitled John Bailey , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 6 June 2010; (p. 19)

— Review of Silence Hoa Pham 2010 single work drama
Holding Their Peace after the War Martin Ball , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 22 May 2010; (p. 22)

— Review of Silence Hoa Pham 2010 single work drama
Untitled John Bailey , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 6 June 2010; (p. 19)

— Review of Silence Hoa Pham 2010 single work drama
Keeping Body and Soul Together Robin Usher , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 21 May 2010; (p. 17)
From Gangs to Shopping Malls : Sentimental Aesthetics in Vietnamese Australian Community Arts Scott Brook , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Intercultural Studies , vol. 35 no. 3 2014; (p. 281-294)
'This article describes developments in Vietnamese Australian community arts in the context of recent reforms to Community Cultural Development (CCD) funding. While a discussion of two case studies suggests these reforms have encouraged a shift towards post-welfarist and enterprising modes of project development, the article argues that conspicuously ‘cosmo-multiculturalist’ and ‘sentimental aesthetics’ cannot be explained entirely in terms of post-1980s cultural policies of the Australian Labour government. The article concludes that recent attempts to link CCD work to professional arts networks were in fact anticipated by the explicit agendas of Vietnamese Australian CCD workers themselves, although for quite different purposes.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 9 Aug 2010 08:58:04
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X