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y Daywards single work   novel   fantasy   young adult  
Is part of Darklands Trilogy Anthony Eaton 2005 series - author novel (number 3 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 2010 2010
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'When you've run from the past, you have to stand and face the future...

'Dara, her brother Jaran and their cousin Eyna have grown up among the Clan; their lives are peaceful as they eke out an existence in the towering forest below their escarpment home. But when the ghosts of a dead civilisation reach out to haunt them one final time, they and their family must set out, on an unmapped path across a dying land.

'Walking daywards, always into the sun.' Source: www.uqp.uq.edu.au (Sighted 07/04/2010).

Notes

  • Dedication: For Toby
  • Launched at Old Prison Hospital, Fremantle, 27 July 2010.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Perfect Place to Set a Novel about the End of the World? Trends in Australian Post-Nuclear Fiction for Young Adults Elizabeth Braithwaite , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 53 no. 2 2015; (p. 22-29)
'"Australia has a fascinating yet contradictory nuclear history," writes Jeffrey Lantis, and this ambiguity can be seen in the post-nuclear young adult fiction produced in that country. British, American and German speculative fiction for young readers set after nuclear disaster tends to suggest reasons for the disaster, and by implication, to position readers towards acting to stop the disaster happening in the real world. By contrast, Australian writers of both fantasy and speculative fiction tend to be less concerned with the cause of the disaster than with how the nuclear apocalypse can be used to explore a range of cultural issues which may appear to have little or nothing to do with nuclear disaster. Working with the notion of apocalypse as both revelation and, more popularly, as a violent "end event" (Curtis), this paper explores why young adult post-nuclear fiction produced in Australia tends to be different from that produced in Britain, the USA and Germany, and demonstrates how the nuclear disaster is used in a selection of Australian young adult post-disaster fiction to address cultural issues, particularly those dealing with Australia's Indigenous population, and with the contemporary treatment of refugees.' (Publication summary)
The Spaces between : Examining Young Adult Creative Practice within an Academic Context Anthony Eaton , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : Special Issue Website Series , October no. 32 2015;

Drawing upon ideas of practice-led research outlined by Webb and Brien (2008), and considering these within the context of my own creative practice, this article explores the intersections of the positions of writer-as-teacher, writer-as-artist, and writer-as-scholar. This is contextualized with reference to three of my creative works from different phases of my career, A New Kind of Dreaming (2001 ), Fireshadow (2005) and Daywards (2010). Framed by Webb’s argument for the appropriateness of Bourdieu’s ideas of practice-led research (2012) and Nodelman’s suggestions about the relationship between habitus and the agency of young-adult writers (2008), it will examine the degree to which my construction of young protagonists has been shaped by, and has in turn shaped, my changing habitus as a practicing young adult writer and scholar of children’s literature. Drawing upon my dual roles as scholar and teacher of creative writing within the academy, and reader and scholar of children’s literature studies, it argues that the liminality of the scholarly/creative space emerging from this nexus has impacted upon the ways I consider and construct my ‘child’ characters and my own position in relation to them.'

Source: Abstract.

Cover Notes Lucy Sussex , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 2 May 2010; (p. 21)

— Review of Daywards Anthony Eaton 2010 single work novel
Untitled Susan Hill , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , April vol. 89 no. 7 2010; (p. 40)

— Review of Daywards Anthony Eaton 2010 single work novel
Cover Book Review : Daywards Lyn Linning , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , March vol. 25 no. 1 2010; (p. 10)

— Review of Daywards Anthony Eaton 2010 single work novel
Towards Renewed Worlds Colin Steele , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 19 June 2010; (p. 24)

— Review of Walking the Tree Kaaron Warren 2010 single work novel ; Daywards Anthony Eaton 2010 single work novel
Untitled Nicola Muller , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 24 no. 3 2010; (p. 20-21)

— Review of Daywards Anthony Eaton 2010 single work novel
Cover Notes Lucy Sussex , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 2 May 2010; (p. 21)

— Review of Daywards Anthony Eaton 2010 single work novel
Untitled Susan Hill , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , April vol. 89 no. 7 2010; (p. 40)

— Review of Daywards Anthony Eaton 2010 single work novel
Cover Book Review : Daywards Lyn Linning , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , March vol. 25 no. 1 2010; (p. 10)

— Review of Daywards Anthony Eaton 2010 single work novel
Towards Renewed Worlds Colin Steele , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 19 June 2010; (p. 24)

— Review of Walking the Tree Kaaron Warren 2010 single work novel ; Daywards Anthony Eaton 2010 single work novel
Untitled Nicola Muller , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 24 no. 3 2010; (p. 20-21)

— Review of Daywards Anthony Eaton 2010 single work novel
The Perfect Place to Set a Novel about the End of the World? Trends in Australian Post-Nuclear Fiction for Young Adults Elizabeth Braithwaite , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 53 no. 2 2015; (p. 22-29)
'"Australia has a fascinating yet contradictory nuclear history," writes Jeffrey Lantis, and this ambiguity can be seen in the post-nuclear young adult fiction produced in that country. British, American and German speculative fiction for young readers set after nuclear disaster tends to suggest reasons for the disaster, and by implication, to position readers towards acting to stop the disaster happening in the real world. By contrast, Australian writers of both fantasy and speculative fiction tend to be less concerned with the cause of the disaster than with how the nuclear apocalypse can be used to explore a range of cultural issues which may appear to have little or nothing to do with nuclear disaster. Working with the notion of apocalypse as both revelation and, more popularly, as a violent "end event" (Curtis), this paper explores why young adult post-nuclear fiction produced in Australia tends to be different from that produced in Britain, the USA and Germany, and demonstrates how the nuclear disaster is used in a selection of Australian young adult post-disaster fiction to address cultural issues, particularly those dealing with Australia's Indigenous population, and with the contemporary treatment of refugees.' (Publication summary)
The Spaces between : Examining Young Adult Creative Practice within an Academic Context Anthony Eaton , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : Special Issue Website Series , October no. 32 2015;

Drawing upon ideas of practice-led research outlined by Webb and Brien (2008), and considering these within the context of my own creative practice, this article explores the intersections of the positions of writer-as-teacher, writer-as-artist, and writer-as-scholar. This is contextualized with reference to three of my creative works from different phases of my career, A New Kind of Dreaming (2001 ), Fireshadow (2005) and Daywards (2010). Framed by Webb’s argument for the appropriateness of Bourdieu’s ideas of practice-led research (2012) and Nodelman’s suggestions about the relationship between habitus and the agency of young-adult writers (2008), it will examine the degree to which my construction of young protagonists has been shaped by, and has in turn shaped, my changing habitus as a practicing young adult writer and scholar of children’s literature. Drawing upon my dual roles as scholar and teacher of creative writing within the academy, and reader and scholar of children’s literature studies, it argues that the liminality of the scholarly/creative space emerging from this nexus has impacted upon the ways I consider and construct my ‘child’ characters and my own position in relation to them.'

Source: Abstract.

Last amended 17 Feb 2016 14:20:54
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