Nation, Literature, Location single work   criticism  
  • Author: Philip Mead http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/mead-philip
Issue Details: First known date: 2009 2009
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'This chapter focuses on the role played by place-consciousness in [the] constantly changing matrix of literature, nation and place.' (551)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y The Cambridge History of Australian Literature Peter Pierce (editor), Cambridge Port Melbourne : Cambridge University Press , 2009 Z1604759 2009 reference 'The Cambridge History of Australian Literature ... spans Australian literary history from colonial origins, encompassing indigenous and migrant literatures, as well as representations of Asia and the Pacific and the role of literary culture in modern Australian society. Bringing together a distinguished line-up of contributors, this volume explores each of the literary modes in an Australian context, including short story, poetry, children's literature, autobiography and fiction. This book is an essential reference for general readers and specialists alike.' (From the publisher's website.) Cambridge Port Melbourne : Cambridge University Press , 2009 pg. 549-567

Works about this Work

Transnational (Il)literacies : Reading the "New Chinese Literature in Australia" in China Wenche Ommundsen , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 25 no. 1 2011; (p. 83-89)
'Ommundsen talks about the transnational in Australian literary studies which was the lively critical debate at the time when her colleagues Alison Broinowski, Paul Sharrad and she in 2008 embarked on the ARC-supported project "Globalizing Australian literature: Asian Australian writing, Asian perspectives on Australian literature." As organizers of the 2008 conference of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature conference, the Wollongong team decided to focus on this articulation between the transnational/global and the national in Australian literary studies, hoping that the papers would shed further light on these debates, at the same time enriching the theoretical arguments underpinning their own project.' (Publisher's abstract)
What We Have to Work With : Teaching Australian Literature in the Contemporary Context Philip Mead , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 52-69)
'I would like to explore some aspects of the experience of literary knowledge, amongst and between teachers and students, as reported in the 2010 Australian Learning & Teaching Council (ALTC)-funded project Australian Literature Teaching Survey. This exploration is framed by the contexts of that survey, particularly the history of 'English' in Australian education and its evolution, in the second half of the twentieth century, to include the study of Australian literature (see Dale, 1997; Reid, 1988) and recent responses to a federal government led proposal for a national or 'Australian' curriculum (K-12), which includes Australian literature within the proposed English strand. These reflections on the issues and questions that came out of the work of the ALTC report are influenced by my understanding of the disciplinary history of tertiary literary studies and of literary education at the secondary level, as well as by my own experiences of teaching literature within those educational and institutional contexts. These reflections are also informed by studies of English pedagogy that aim to pay attention to the lifeworlds of students and teachers and their experiences in the classroom (like Doecke and Parr, 2008).' (Author's introduction, 52)
Transnational (Il)literacies : Reading the "New Chinese Literature in Australia" in China Wenche Ommundsen , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 25 no. 1 2011; (p. 83-89)
'Ommundsen talks about the transnational in Australian literary studies which was the lively critical debate at the time when her colleagues Alison Broinowski, Paul Sharrad and she in 2008 embarked on the ARC-supported project "Globalizing Australian literature: Asian Australian writing, Asian perspectives on Australian literature." As organizers of the 2008 conference of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature conference, the Wollongong team decided to focus on this articulation between the transnational/global and the national in Australian literary studies, hoping that the papers would shed further light on these debates, at the same time enriching the theoretical arguments underpinning their own project.' (Publisher's abstract)
What We Have to Work With : Teaching Australian Literature in the Contemporary Context Philip Mead , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 52-69)
'I would like to explore some aspects of the experience of literary knowledge, amongst and between teachers and students, as reported in the 2010 Australian Learning & Teaching Council (ALTC)-funded project Australian Literature Teaching Survey. This exploration is framed by the contexts of that survey, particularly the history of 'English' in Australian education and its evolution, in the second half of the twentieth century, to include the study of Australian literature (see Dale, 1997; Reid, 1988) and recent responses to a federal government led proposal for a national or 'Australian' curriculum (K-12), which includes Australian literature within the proposed English strand. These reflections on the issues and questions that came out of the work of the ALTC report are influenced by my understanding of the disciplinary history of tertiary literary studies and of literary education at the secondary level, as well as by my own experiences of teaching literature within those educational and institutional contexts. These reflections are also informed by studies of English pedagogy that aim to pay attention to the lifeworlds of students and teachers and their experiences in the classroom (like Doecke and Parr, 2008).' (Author's introduction, 52)
Last amended 16 Dec 2009 14:00:42
X