5654530945647890209.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y Hopscotch : Medusa Stone single work   children's fiction   children's   adventure  
Alternative title: Medusa Stone
Is part of Hopscotch Ian Trevaskis 2009 series - author children's fiction (number 1 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 2009 2009
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Jake and Hannah discover a mysterious stone but they have no idea of the power it holds. While inadvertently using the stone during a game of hopscotch, Jake vanishes and Hannah discovers the only way to find out what happened to him is to also play the game.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Newtown, Marrickville - Camperdown area, Sydney Southern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Walker Books Australia , 2009 .
      5654530945647890209.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 235p.
      Note/s:
      • Publication date: 1 June 2009.
      ISBN: 9781921529115 (pbk.)

Works about this Work

Friday Essay: Feminist Medusas and Outback Minotaurs – Why Myth Is Big in Children’s Books Elizabeth Hale , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 3 June 2016;

'... Monsters from classical myth have been lurking in the gullies of Western literature for a long time – in retellings and adaptations, and acting as symbols and metaphors for aspects of the human experience.'

'They’ve been surfacing recently in fantasy for children and young adults. Imaginary Medusas, realistically drawn Minotaurs, as well as a multitude of many-headed Scyllas, Hydras and Cerberuses: they all appear in Australian children’s and YA fiction. ...'

Untitled Jennifer Rumsey , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Books Buzz , August no. 10 2009; (p. 16-17)

— Review of Hopscotch : Medusa Stone Ian Trevaskis 2009 single work children's fiction
[Untitled] Helen Purdie , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies: Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 24 no. 4 2009; (p. 37)

— Review of Hopscotch : Medusa Stone Ian Trevaskis 2009 single work children's fiction
[Untitled] Christy Fulcher , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Summer vol. 17 no. 4 2009; (p. 31)

— Review of Hopscotch : Medusa Stone Ian Trevaskis 2009 single work children's fiction
Untitled Jennifer Rumsey , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Books Buzz , August no. 10 2009; (p. 16-17)

— Review of Hopscotch : Medusa Stone Ian Trevaskis 2009 single work children's fiction
[Untitled] Helen Purdie , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies: Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 24 no. 4 2009; (p. 37)

— Review of Hopscotch : Medusa Stone Ian Trevaskis 2009 single work children's fiction
[Untitled] Christy Fulcher , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Summer vol. 17 no. 4 2009; (p. 31)

— Review of Hopscotch : Medusa Stone Ian Trevaskis 2009 single work children's fiction
Friday Essay: Feminist Medusas and Outback Minotaurs – Why Myth Is Big in Children’s Books Elizabeth Hale , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 3 June 2016;

'... Monsters from classical myth have been lurking in the gullies of Western literature for a long time – in retellings and adaptations, and acting as symbols and metaphors for aspects of the human experience.'

'They’ve been surfacing recently in fantasy for children and young adults. Imaginary Medusas, realistically drawn Minotaurs, as well as a multitude of many-headed Scyllas, Hydras and Cerberuses: they all appear in Australian children’s and YA fiction. ...'

Last amended 6 Sep 2016 09:55:32
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X