form y The Wog Boy single work   film/TV   humour  
Issue Details: First known date: 2000... 2000
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Notes

  • Based on characters in the television comedy series Acropolis Now (1989-1992) and stage shows.
  • Prequel to Wog Boy 2: Kings of Mykonos.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

It Isn't Like We're Lacking Inspiration in Our Books and Music : What's Happened to Great Aussie Movies? Nicolle Flint , 2014 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 23 September 2014; (p. 22)
Reel Time : Red Dog Nipping at Hollywood's Heels Michael Bodey , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 10 August 2011; (p. 17)
Untitled Michael Bodey , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 9 June 2010; (p. 19)
Untitled Michael Bodey , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 16 June 2010; (p. 15)
Wogboy Comedies and the Australian National Type Felicity Collins , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Diasporas of Australian Cinema 2009; (p. 73-82)

'Popular Australian film comedy since the early 1970s has been dominated by reinventions of the national type. These reinventions involve transformations of the urban larrikin and the bush battler, first established in silent film classics such as The Sentimental Bloke (Raymond Longford 1919) and in Cinesound Studio's Rudd family comedies of the 1930s, directed by Ken G. Hall. These comic types continue to surface in popular film and television as the larrikin, ocker or decent Aussie bloke, exemplified in the 1970s by Bazza McKenzie, in the 1980s by Crocodile Dundee, in the 1990s by Darryl Kerrigan in The Castle, and most recently by cable TV showman Steve Irwin until his untimely death in 2006. Yet despite decades of multiculturalism, little attention has been paid to the impact of post-war, non -British immigration on Australian comic types. This chapter examines three popular comedies which champion ethnically marked characters as either 'New Australians' (They're a Weird Mob, Michael Powell 1966), 'wogboys' (The Wog Boy, Alexsi Vellis 2000) or `chockos' (Fat Pizza, Paul Fenech 2003). It asks whether 'wogboys' and 'chockos' - as diasporic, multicultural or new world comic types - have trumped the larrikins and ockers of Australian screen comedy, or whether 'wogsploitation' films are popular with Australian film and television audiences precisely because they tap into a long. standing national type without disturbing its key characteristics.' (Publication abstract)

Ethnic Comedy in Contemporary Australia Jessica Milner Davis , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Author , December vol. 41 no. 3 2009; (p. 20-22)
'Having a good sense of humour' is something most societies and cultures pride themselves upon. But in Australia, joking of all kinds can be targeted at all social levels and while witty is good, crude will also pass. For Australians, using (or at least tolerating) humour is not so much permitted, as compulsory. Our national identity is almost synonymous with the right to take the mickey (aka - take the piss - a cruder, older form of the expression, now acceptable again). Our culture deploys humour as a weapon to identify those who are truly 'at home', in the land and the society. Thus it's not so much the nature of the humour we use as how we use it that indicates our 'Australian-ness'.
Untitled Michael Bodey , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 16 June 2010; (p. 15)
Untitled Michael Bodey , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 9 June 2010; (p. 19)
Wogboy Comedies and the Australian National Type Felicity Collins , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Diasporas of Australian Cinema 2009; (p. 73-82)

'Popular Australian film comedy since the early 1970s has been dominated by reinventions of the national type. These reinventions involve transformations of the urban larrikin and the bush battler, first established in silent film classics such as The Sentimental Bloke (Raymond Longford 1919) and in Cinesound Studio's Rudd family comedies of the 1930s, directed by Ken G. Hall. These comic types continue to surface in popular film and television as the larrikin, ocker or decent Aussie bloke, exemplified in the 1970s by Bazza McKenzie, in the 1980s by Crocodile Dundee, in the 1990s by Darryl Kerrigan in The Castle, and most recently by cable TV showman Steve Irwin until his untimely death in 2006. Yet despite decades of multiculturalism, little attention has been paid to the impact of post-war, non -British immigration on Australian comic types. This chapter examines three popular comedies which champion ethnically marked characters as either 'New Australians' (They're a Weird Mob, Michael Powell 1966), 'wogboys' (The Wog Boy, Alexsi Vellis 2000) or `chockos' (Fat Pizza, Paul Fenech 2003). It asks whether 'wogboys' and 'chockos' - as diasporic, multicultural or new world comic types - have trumped the larrikins and ockers of Australian screen comedy, or whether 'wogsploitation' films are popular with Australian film and television audiences precisely because they tap into a long. standing national type without disturbing its key characteristics.' (Publication abstract)

When the Sun Sets over Suburbia : Class and Subculture in Bruce Beresford's Puberty Blues Lesley Speed , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 20 no. 3 2006; (p. 407 - 418)
Last amended 25 Aug 2009 13:35:13
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