Issue Details: First known date: 2009 2009
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

A significant number of critical and analytical articles by leading scholars in Australian literary studies have recently drawn attention to the transnational dimensions of the discipline. Amongst these calls for the internationalising of Australian literary studies, however, multicultural literature appears to have been given short shrift. This article traces the mainstream enthusiasm for transnational research, notes the work of critics who have identified aspects of multicultural literature that have been overlooked in Australia, and then provides examples of two further areas of transnational literary production that have been critically neglected. The journal Kalimat which published in Arabic and English and the online Spanish-language newsletter Hontanar are discussed as illustrative of this transnational literature, as are works by Yahia al-Samawi, Juan Garrido-Salgado and Mario Licón Cabrera, overseas-born poets now residing in and writing from Australia.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y JASAL Journal of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature; Australian Literature in a Global World Special Issue Antonio Jose Simoes Da Silva (editor), Wenche Ommundsen (editor), 2009 Z1605155 2009 periodical issue This Special Issue of JASAL is based on the 2008 ASAL conference 'Australian Literature in a Global World' held at the University of Wollongong. The conference aimed to 'explore the effects, on the national literature, of different aspects of globalisation: transnational flows of people, ideas and cultural forms; globalisation in the publishing and education industries; the global marketplace for cultural production'. (Editor's introduction.) 2009

Works about this Work

Towards a Multilingual National Literature : The Tung Wah Times and the Origins of Chinese Australian Writing Zhong Huang , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 15 no. 3 2015;
'A large and important body of Australian writing has until now remained excluded from histories and anthologies: literature in languages other than English. A new research project entitled 'New transnationalisms: Australia's multilingual literary heritage' traces the history of Australian writing in Chinese Vietnamese, Arabic and Spanish. The case study in this article presents a survey of the earliest Chinese language literary publications in the Sydney newspaper the Tung Wah Times (1898-1936): historical contexts, themes and genres, cultural function within the Chinese Australian community.' (Publication abstract)
Transnational (Il)literacies : Reading the "New Chinese Literature in Australia" in China Wenche Ommundsen , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 25 no. 1 2011; (p. 83-89)
'Ommundsen talks about the transnational in Australian literary studies which was the lively critical debate at the time when her colleagues Alison Broinowski, Paul Sharrad and she in 2008 embarked on the ARC-supported project "Globalizing Australian literature: Asian Australian writing, Asian perspectives on Australian literature." As organizers of the 2008 conference of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature conference, the Wollongong team decided to focus on this articulation between the transnational/global and the national in Australian literary studies, hoping that the papers would shed further light on these debates, at the same time enriching the theoretical arguments underpinning their own project.' (Publisher's abstract)
Transnational (Il)literacies : Reading the "New Chinese Literature in Australia" in China Wenche Ommundsen , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 25 no. 1 2011; (p. 83-89)
'Ommundsen talks about the transnational in Australian literary studies which was the lively critical debate at the time when her colleagues Alison Broinowski, Paul Sharrad and she in 2008 embarked on the ARC-supported project "Globalizing Australian literature: Asian Australian writing, Asian perspectives on Australian literature." As organizers of the 2008 conference of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature conference, the Wollongong team decided to focus on this articulation between the transnational/global and the national in Australian literary studies, hoping that the papers would shed further light on these debates, at the same time enriching the theoretical arguments underpinning their own project.' (Publisher's abstract)
Towards a Multilingual National Literature : The Tung Wah Times and the Origins of Chinese Australian Writing Zhong Huang , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 15 no. 3 2015;
'A large and important body of Australian writing has until now remained excluded from histories and anthologies: literature in languages other than English. A new research project entitled 'New transnationalisms: Australia's multilingual literary heritage' traces the history of Australian writing in Chinese Vietnamese, Arabic and Spanish. The case study in this article presents a survey of the earliest Chinese language literary publications in the Sydney newspaper the Tung Wah Times (1898-1936): historical contexts, themes and genres, cultural function within the Chinese Australian community.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 9 Feb 2016 07:18:56
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