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Screen cap from promotional trailer
form y Serenades single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 2001 2001
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Jila, the daughter of an Aboriginal woman and an Afghan cameleer, grows up on a mission after her mother's death and is sold for marriage by her father. When Johann, the young man she first met on the mission, reappears, Jila is hopeful that she may be freed from the arranged marriage.' Sources: http://librariesaustralia.nla.gov.au/ (Sighted 15 July 2009).

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Serenades Michelle Langford , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Making Film and Television Histories : Australia and New Zealand 2011; (p. 252-256)
Aftershock and the Desert Landscape in Heaven's Burning, The Last Days of Chez Nous, Holy Smoke, Serenades, Yolgnu Boy and The Missing Felicity Collins , Therese Davis , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Cinema after Mabo 2004; (p. 75-93)
In this chapter Collins and Davis 'are intersted in how a familiar icon of Australian cinema, the landscape (in particular the desert landscape, the outback), is suddenly made strange (unbearable even) by a historic event and how this raises questions to do with historical amnesia, shock and memory in a national cinema. In order to sneak up on on this post-Mabo experience of aftershock, we want to place these films in relation to threee critical categories which have been important in making sense of the ad hoc diversity of Australian films.' Source : Australian Cinema After Mabo (2004)
Aftershock and the Desert Landscape in Heaven's Burning, The Last Days of Chez Nous, Holy Smoke, Serenades, Yolgnu Boy and The Missing Felicity Collins , Therese Davis , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Cinema after Mabo 2004; (p. 75-93)
In this chapter Collins and Davis 'are intersted in how a familiar icon of Australian cinema, the landscape (in particular the desert landscape, the outback), is suddenly made strange (unbearable even) by a historic event and how this raises questions to do with historical amnesia, shock and memory in a national cinema. In order to sneak up on on this post-Mabo experience of aftershock, we want to place these films in relation to threee critical categories which have been important in making sense of the ad hoc diversity of Australian films.' Source : Australian Cinema After Mabo (2004)
Serenades Michelle Langford , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Making Film and Television Histories : Australia and New Zealand 2011; (p. 252-256)
Last amended 13 Mar 2015 13:16:45
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  • Central Australia,
  • 1890s
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