5804637401447088162.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
Issue Details: First known date: 2000 2000
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Broken Circles is the story of Australia's Stolen Generations. It is a major work, revealing the dark heart of the shared history of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. Aboriginal child removal emerges as an essential part the processes of dispossession, depopulation and destruction of Aboriginal societies and cultures that began with colonisation and continue to affect Aboriginal communities to this day. Anna Haebich provides a comprehensive and accessible national overview of events from the earliest abductions of Aboriginal children by colonists, to the systematic removal and institutionalisation of the first half of the twentieth century and the treatment of children and their families under the assimilation policies of the fifties and sixties. She also tells of the struggles and achievements of Aboriginal people to return control over the children to their families.' (Source: National Library of Australia)

Notes

  • Other formats: Also e-book, and large print

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Fremantle, Fremantle area, South West Perth, Perth, Western Australia,: Fremantle Press , 2000 .
      5804637401447088162.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 726p.
      Description: illus., maps, ports.
      Reprinted: 2001
      Note/s:
      • Includes chronology, endnotes, bibliography and index.
      ISBN: 9781863683050 (pbk), 1863683054 (pbk)

Works about this Work

Connections Made and Broken : Intimacy and Estrangement in Australian Feminist Historiography Catherine Kevin , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Outskirts : Feminisms Along the Edge , May no. 28 2013;

'In this article I consider approaches taken to questions of intimacy and estrangement in feminist history in Australia since 1975. Pioneering works, namely Damned whores and God’s Police (Summers 1975); The Real Matilda (Dixson 1976); and My wife, my daughter and poor Mary Ann (Kingston 1975) demonstrated that in order to understand the nature of women’s subordination, feminism needed histories that would describe the changing contexts in which oppressive forces had shaped women’s relationships, as well as the variety of their oppressive effects. The trajectories of feminist engagements with theory in the 1970s generated particular historical questions that enabled accounts of intimacy and estrangement to feature in these early works. This ambitious body of scholarship laid a solid foundation on which Australian feminist historians have since built, offering vivid depictions of women and the contexts and dynamics of their relationships, but the story of the emergence of this rich body of work is complex and at times contested.' (Source: Author's introduction)

Broken Circles : Fragmenting Indigenous Families 1800 - 2000 Tim Rowse , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Studies in Western Australian History , no. 22 2001; (p. 178-181)

— Review of Broken Circles : Fragmenting Indigenous Families 1800 - 2000 Anna Haebich 2000 single work non-fiction
Broken Circles : Fragmenting Indigenous Families 1800 - 2000 Tim Rowse , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Studies in Western Australian History , no. 22 2001; (p. 178-181)

— Review of Broken Circles : Fragmenting Indigenous Families 1800 - 2000 Anna Haebich 2000 single work non-fiction
Connections Made and Broken : Intimacy and Estrangement in Australian Feminist Historiography Catherine Kevin , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Outskirts : Feminisms Along the Edge , May no. 28 2013;

'In this article I consider approaches taken to questions of intimacy and estrangement in feminist history in Australia since 1975. Pioneering works, namely Damned whores and God’s Police (Summers 1975); The Real Matilda (Dixson 1976); and My wife, my daughter and poor Mary Ann (Kingston 1975) demonstrated that in order to understand the nature of women’s subordination, feminism needed histories that would describe the changing contexts in which oppressive forces had shaped women’s relationships, as well as the variety of their oppressive effects. The trajectories of feminist engagements with theory in the 1970s generated particular historical questions that enabled accounts of intimacy and estrangement to feature in these early works. This ambitious body of scholarship laid a solid foundation on which Australian feminist historians have since built, offering vivid depictions of women and the contexts and dynamics of their relationships, but the story of the emergence of this rich body of work is complex and at times contested.' (Source: Author's introduction)

Last amended 22 Jun 2015 14:36:25
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