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Source: Australian Screen
form y Let George Do It single work   film/TV   humour  
Issue Details: First known date: 1938 1938
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Based on a story by Hal Carleton, Let George Do It is the fourth George Wallace film, and the first of two to be produced by Ken G. Hall. The film also established the formula that its sequel Gone To The Dogs (1939) would follow fairly closely. In this respect, Hall not only incorporated a romantic sub-plot into the main story line, but also provided several opportunities for song and dance sequences and self-contained comedy routines.

The story line concerns Joe (played by George Wallace), a man who is frustrated by both unrequited love and his chronic unemployment. While drunk, he decides to commit suicide and offers to leave all his possessions to a local gangster, Zilch, if he will arrange a painless death. The next day, Joe comes to his senses, a matter that is helped enormously when he is told that he has just inherited an enormous fortune. Unfortunately, Zilch becomes even more determined to carry out Joe's previous wishes. Joe finally wins out in the end, but not before being chased across Sydney Harbour as he attempts to gain possession of the money.

A water ballet sequence near the end of the wild speed-boat chase across Sydney Harbour was deleted from the final cut in an effort to maintain the pace of the dramatic action.

Notes

  • The premiere screening was staged simultaneously in Hobart and Brisbane. The fact that this was another Wallace film to premiere in the Queensland capital, and that the star is again referred to as the "Boy from the Valley," further demonstrates the close connection he had with the city. The Courier Mail, which describes his performance having captured the public, suggests that 'cameras, spotlights and a little more make-up seem to have made no difference to the wide-eyed comedian with the simple air and the nimble antics since he tripped to the left and right on Queensland stages many years ago' (20 June 1938, p.13).
  • As with Gone To The Dogs (1939), Let George Do It was screened in England in an abridged version (in early 1940), and renamed In The Nick Of Time, due to the tilte being used for George Formby's 1940 feature film.
  • Further reference:

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 1938

Works about this Work

George Wallace at His Best in Fine Comedy 1938 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 20 June 1938 1938; (p. 13)

— Review of Let George Do It George Wallace Frank Harvey 1938 single work film/TV
George Wallace at His Best in Fine Comedy 1938 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 20 June 1938 1938; (p. 13)

— Review of Let George Do It George Wallace Frank Harvey 1938 single work film/TV
Last amended 14 Oct 2014 08:52:46
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