Screen cap from promotional trailer
form y The Goddess of '67 single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 2001 2001
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

The 'goddess' in this film refers to the Citroën DS (nicknamed 'Déesse'), a famous French car first produced in the fifties. The story concerns J. M., a young, well-to-do Japanese man who desires owning a Déesse. When one comes up for sale in Australia via the internet, J. M. travels there to buy it. Upon reaching his destination, however, he finds the seller and his wife dead and their house inhabited by a seventeen-year-old girl. He initially runs out in horror but returns in order to find out if the car is still there. He and the girl soon afterwards undertake a five-day drive into the outback. It also becomes 'a trip back in time into the early youth of the girl and into her family's chronicle'.

Source: IMDB.

Notes

  • The trailer for this film is available to watch via YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qt0AldAJv1k (Sighted: 12/10/2012)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Re-Envisioning the Japanese : 'The Goddess of 1967' and 'Japanese Story' Dennis Haskell , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Made : A Multicultural Reader 2010; (p. 127-136)
'One key aspect of the revaluation of Australian identity in the last thirty years has been a reconsideration of Australia's relationships with Asia. This paper takes up this issue in relation to Japan, for many years Australia's largest economic trading partner, through examination of two Australian films, The Goddess of 1967 (2000) and Japanese Story (2004).' (p. 127).
Representations of the Japanese in Contemporary Australian Literature and Film Erika Smith , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Voices , vol. 2 no. 2008;
'The objective of this article is to investigate general contemporary Australian perceptions of the Japanese. I will do this by exploring how Australian contemporary literature (2006-2007) and Australian contemporary film (1997-2007) depicts Japanese characters. By analysing the representation of the Japanese characters in these areas I will attempt to gather a broad understanding of how Australians represent, perceive and identify the Japanese today.' -- Author's abstract
An Interview with Clara Law Kathryn Millard (interviewer), 2001 single work interview
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , April-May no. 13 2001;
'I remember seeing Clara Law's film Floating Life at the Sydney Film Festival in 1995. I was charmed and amused by its particular take on suburban Australia, moved by its musings on the quest for a sense of home. And drawn to its sense of poetry and design. I re-visited other films by Clara Law. The almost breathtakingly beautiful Temptation of a Monk (1993) and the intriguing Autumn Moon (1992). I spoke with Clara recently about her new film, The Goddess of 1967.' (Author's introduction)
Materialism and Spiritualism in The Goddess of 1967 Fiona Villella , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , April-May no. 13 2001;
'Perhaps the best word that describes the distinct quality of Clara Law's latest film The Goddess of 1967 (2000) is postmodern. Unlike any other contemporary Australian feature-filmmaker, she betrays an astute, experimental attitude to the medium, an inclination to gather and juxtapose markedly different people and places and disparate cultural meanings (the outback, machine and modernity, the city) and a strong interest in states of transition, dislocation, and isolation. In Goddess, a blind girl "B.G" (Rose Byrne) and Japanese man "J.M." (Rikiya Kurokawa) journey through the Australian outback in a Citroen named 'Goddess' toward a 'heart of darkness' or primal, originating point that ultimately sets the soul of the young blind girl free. Intermittently punctuating what is essentially a forward-journey-back-in-time are flashbacks of the past, mainly of B.G.'s past but also J.M.'s, a Roland Barthes quote, and advertising footage and statistics celebrating the superiority in design and manufacture of the Citroen. However, despite the postmodern sensibility and sophisticated experimental play with sound, music, camera work, colour and the landscape, ideas of character and story remain essentially conventional and clichéd throughout Goddess, producing a strange mismatch effect throughout the film.' (Author's introduction)
Representations of the Japanese in Contemporary Australian Literature and Film Erika Smith , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Voices , vol. 2 no. 2008;
'The objective of this article is to investigate general contemporary Australian perceptions of the Japanese. I will do this by exploring how Australian contemporary literature (2006-2007) and Australian contemporary film (1997-2007) depicts Japanese characters. By analysing the representation of the Japanese characters in these areas I will attempt to gather a broad understanding of how Australians represent, perceive and identify the Japanese today.' -- Author's abstract
Re-Envisioning the Japanese : 'The Goddess of 1967' and 'Japanese Story' Dennis Haskell , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Made : A Multicultural Reader 2010; (p. 127-136)
'One key aspect of the revaluation of Australian identity in the last thirty years has been a reconsideration of Australia's relationships with Asia. This paper takes up this issue in relation to Japan, for many years Australia's largest economic trading partner, through examination of two Australian films, The Goddess of 1967 (2000) and Japanese Story (2004).' (p. 127).
An Interview with Clara Law Kathryn Millard (interviewer), 2001 single work interview
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , April-May no. 13 2001;
'I remember seeing Clara Law's film Floating Life at the Sydney Film Festival in 1995. I was charmed and amused by its particular take on suburban Australia, moved by its musings on the quest for a sense of home. And drawn to its sense of poetry and design. I re-visited other films by Clara Law. The almost breathtakingly beautiful Temptation of a Monk (1993) and the intriguing Autumn Moon (1992). I spoke with Clara recently about her new film, The Goddess of 1967.' (Author's introduction)
Materialism and Spiritualism in The Goddess of 1967 Fiona Villella , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , April-May no. 13 2001;
'Perhaps the best word that describes the distinct quality of Clara Law's latest film The Goddess of 1967 (2000) is postmodern. Unlike any other contemporary Australian feature-filmmaker, she betrays an astute, experimental attitude to the medium, an inclination to gather and juxtapose markedly different people and places and disparate cultural meanings (the outback, machine and modernity, the city) and a strong interest in states of transition, dislocation, and isolation. In Goddess, a blind girl "B.G" (Rose Byrne) and Japanese man "J.M." (Rikiya Kurokawa) journey through the Australian outback in a Citroen named 'Goddess' toward a 'heart of darkness' or primal, originating point that ultimately sets the soul of the young blind girl free. Intermittently punctuating what is essentially a forward-journey-back-in-time are flashbacks of the past, mainly of B.G.'s past but also J.M.'s, a Roland Barthes quote, and advertising footage and statistics celebrating the superiority in design and manufacture of the Citroen. However, despite the postmodern sensibility and sophisticated experimental play with sound, music, camera work, colour and the landscape, ideas of character and story remain essentially conventional and clichéd throughout Goddess, producing a strange mismatch effect throughout the film.' (Author's introduction)
Last amended 13 Feb 2015 09:06:58
Settings:
  • c
    Japan,
    c
    East Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
  • c
    Australia,
    c
  • Australian Outback, Central Australia,
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