4652928472241779990.jpg
Screen cap from promotional trailer
form y Balibo single work   film/TV   mystery   thriller   crime  
Note: Script editor: Nick Drake.
Issue Details: First known date: 2008... 2008 Balibo
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Jose Ramos Horta, twenty-five years old in 1975, and a member of the Fretilin Government, lures Darwin-based Australian journalist Roger East to East Timor to investigate the disappearance of the 'Balibo Five' - journalists Greg Shackleton, Gary Cunningham and Tony Stewart (Ch9) and from their rival network Brian Peters and Malcolm Rennie (Ch7).

On the morning of October 16, all five men, though identifying themselves as journalists from Australia, are killed in cold blood by the invading Indonesian troops, and their bodies burnt. East does not accept the official story that soon emerges, that the men were killed in cross-fire. Horta and East travel from Dili to Balibo, now occupied during the daytime by Indonesian forces, to try and uncover the truth of the journalists' death.

Back in Dili, East decides to stay on while other journalists are evacuated, in the knowledge that Indonesian forces will soon land in the capital. The very next day Indonesian paratroopers and commandos land from the sea and immediately capture East who is reporting the invasion. Defiant to the end, East is executed the next day on the Dili wharf by an Indonesian execution squad.' Source: http://film.vic.gov.au (Sighted 12/08/2008).

Notes

  • Balibo came second in the audience award for best Australian film at the Melbourne International Film Festival.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Disrespectful Indigenisation : The Films of Robert Connolly Matthew Campora , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , December no. 69 2013;
'In this article, I will examine the work of contemporary Australian filmmaker Robert Connolly (b. 1967), a director who could be considered amongst the most successful contemporary filmmakers working in Australia today. While many of his colleagues have struggled to make their second (or even first) feature film, Connolly, in his various roles, has made a feature roughly every other year since graduating from the Australian Film Television and Radio School in the late 1990s. To date, he has written and directed four feature films, produced nearly a dozen others, worked on such quality television series as The Slap (2011), written and directed a made-for-television-movie, and produced the epic film adaptation of Tim Winton’s short story collection The Turning (2013). His track record in the contemporary industry makes him a significant case study, and as a means of introducing this analysis, I want to briefly consider Graeme Turner’s 1994 article “Whatever Happened to National Identity? Film and Nation in the 1990s” to help situate Connolly’s work in the context of Australian cinema and the narrative trends of recent decades.' (Author's Introduction)
Mythic Tale Brings Nations Together Joyce Morgan , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 28 August 2012; (p. 11)
East Timor : Questions of Intelligence Sylvia Lawson , 2012 single work essay
— Appears in: Demanding the Impossible : Seven Essays on Resistance 2012; (p. 103-128)
'On 2 December 2009, the film censorship authorities in Jakarta, backed by the Indonesian government, handed the Australian director Robert Connolly and his producers a splendid gift: They banned their film Balibo, which had been due for screening at the Jakarta Film Festival. The official statement was that this film, a part-fictional version of events that took place in East Timor thirty-four years ago, was 'negative propaganda', and that the Balibo case was 'closed'.' (Author's introduction, 103)
Out of the Box : Balibo Leigh Paatsch , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 11 January 2012; (p. 43)

— Review of Balibo David Williamson Robert Connolly 2008 single work film/TV
History and Shame : East Timor in Australian Fictions David Callahan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Interventions : International Journal of Postcolonial Studies , November vol. 12 no. 3 2010; (p. 401-414)
This essay examines a series of Australian texts in an attempt to perceive the ways in which East Timor has functioned as a test of the operation of Australian memory and the processing of national shame over the failure of the nation to aid a neighbouring people who had aided Australia at great cost during the Second World War. After introducing the notion of shame and the contrast between official Australian policy and public sentiment over the issue of East Timor from the date of the Indonesian invasion in 1975, a contrast rooted in the nation's sense of itself as being a sponsor of freedom, democracy and the fair go, the essay examines a series of fictional texts dealing with East Timor in some way, and then returns to the concept of shame and its relevance in this context. The texts dealt with include fiction for adults and children: Tony Maniaty's The Children Must Dance (1984), Gail Jones's Other Places (1992), Bill Green's Cleaning Up (1993), Kerry Collison's The Timor Man (1998), Libby Gleeson's Refuge (1998) and Josef Vondra's No-name Bird (2000), along with the Australian-Canadian miniseries Answered by Fire (2006) and the Australian film Balibo (Robert Connolly, 2009). As expected, concerned observers share many features of their reaction to events in East Timor, but inevitably, as they read East Timor they are also reading Australia and its relation to an ethics of conviction that might have dealt more honourably with the invasion and oppression on its doorstep. The analysis draws on the work of Jeffrey Olick, Avishai Margalit and Michael Morgan in its approach to regret, shame and memory.
A Searing Study Showing Best of Australian Film Jim Schembri , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 25 July 2009; (p. 7)

— Review of Balibo David Williamson Robert Connolly 2008 single work film/TV
Film of the Week Tom Ryan , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 9 August 2009; (p. 22) The Sun-Herald , 9 August 2009; (p. 11)

— Review of Balibo David Williamson Robert Connolly 2008 single work film/TV
Their Ghosts May Be Heard Philippa Hawker , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 13 August 2009; (p. 17)

— Review of Balibo David Williamson Robert Connolly 2008 single work film/TV
Newsmen's Nightmare Evan Williams , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 15-16 August 2009; (p. 21)

— Review of Balibo David Williamson Robert Connolly 2008 single work film/TV
Powerful and Emotionally Wrenching Jane Freebury , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 15 August 2009; (p. 25)

— Review of Balibo David Williamson Robert Connolly 2008 single work film/TV
Film Shoot Re-Creates Invasion 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 1 August 2008; (p. 9)
Film Gives Voice to Timor Victim Natasha Robinson , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 15 July 2008; (p. 14)
Film Festival Opener Takes Hard Look at Timor Deaths Michael Bodey , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 20 May 2009; (p. 8)
Bran New Dae to Give International Film Festival an Upbeat Finale Philippa Hawker , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 20 May 2009; (p. 17)
Double Take Natasha Robinson , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian Magazine , 30-31 May 2009; (p. 12)
Tony Maniaty and Rob Connolly talk to Natasha Richardson about the inspiration behind the making of the film Balibo.
Last amended 11 Mar 2015 14:26:32
Subjects:
  • c
    East Timor,
    c
    Southeast Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
  • 1975
Settings:
  • c
    East Timor,
    c
    Southeast Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
  • Darwin, Darwin area, Northern Territory,
  • 1975
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