9094975866458985870.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
6838178489557838578.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
48958587712648668.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
358879215088745548.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y The Lieutenant single work   novel   historical fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 2008 2008
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Daniel Rooke, soldier and astronomer, was always an outsider. As a young lieutenant of marines he arrives in New South Wales on the First Fleet in 1788 and sees his chance. He sets up his observatory away from the main camp, and begins the scientific work that he hopes will make him famous.

'Aboriginal people soon start to visit his isolated promontory, and a child named Tagaran begins to teach him her language. With meticulous care he records their conversations. An extraordinary friendship forms, and Rooke has almost forgotten he is a soldier when a man is fatally wounded in the infant colony. The lieutenant faces a decision that will define not only who he is but the course of his entire life.

'In this profoundly moving novel Kate Grenville returns to the landscape of her much-loved bestseller The Secret River. Inspired by the notebooks of William Dawes, The Lieutenant is a compelling story about friendship and self-discovery by a writer at the peak of her powers.' (Publisher's blurb)

Notes

  • Dedication: Dedicated to Patyegarang and the Cadigal people and William Dawes. Their story inspired this fiction.
  • Information on William Dawes notebooks and the language of the Cadigal people can be seen here: http://www.williamdawes.org/index.html
  • Other formats: Also sound recording, electronic resource, braille and large print

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Text Publishing , 2008 .
      6838178489557838578.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 307p.
      Reprinted: 2014
      ISBN: 9781921351785 (hbk.)
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Atlantic Monthly Press , 2008 .
      9094975866458985870.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 307p.
      Edition info: 1st American ed.
      ISBN: 9780802119162 (hbk.), 0802119166 (hbk.)
    • Edinburgh,
      c
      Scotland,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Canongate , 2009 .
      358879215088745548.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 307p.
      ISBN: 9781847673442 (pbk.), 1847673449 (pbk.)
    • Toronto, Ontario,
      c
      Canada,
      c
      Americas,
      :
      HarperCollins , 2009 .
      48958587712648668.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 1v.p.
      ISBN: 9781554684328 (hbk.), 1554684323 (hbk.)
Alternative title: Het verre paradijs
Language: Dutch
    • Amsterdam,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Anthos (Netherlands) , 2009 .
      3596504888800738707.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 253p.
      ISBN: 9789041414342

Works about this Work

Telling Stories of Colonial Encounters: Kate Grenville’s The Secret River, The Lieutenant and Sarah Thornhill Annalisa Pes , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Text , vol. 11 no. 2 2016;
'The essay examines the fundamental role of storytelling in the different colonial encounters portrayed by Kate Grenville in her historical-based trilogy: The Secret River (2005), The Lieutenant (2008) and Sarah Thornhill (2011). Starting from Grenville’s assertion that the clash between settlers and Aborigines originated mainly from the “tragic inability to communicate across a gulf of culture,” the essay observes how in the three novels communication and, conversely, incommunicability and miscommunication, both between Europeans (or, later, white Australians) and Indigenous Australians and among Europeans themselves, play a fundamental role in establishing, or failing to establish, relationships and in creating, or in trying to solve, conflicts. The importance of storytelling is investigated in its function of (re)definition of identity and as a necessary step in the process of reconciliation.'
y The Lieutenant, Kate Grenville Angie Barillaro , Essendon North : Radiant Heart Publishing , 2015 8919183 2015 single work criticism
Seeing the Cosmos : Ross Gibson’s ‘Simultaneous Living Map’ Catherine Noske , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 15 no. 3 2015;
'In its reading of the journals of William Dawes, Ross Gibson’s 26 Views of the Starburst World offers a dynamic vision of the world. His entry into the landscape of Sydney Cove is characterised by and constructed according to the multiple ‘views’ of his title, each of which interrelate in various, shifting ways to coalesce into a narrative. The version of place which emerges is both strange and beautiful, challenging constructs of nation which depend on notions of locality and ‘rootedness’. Gibson’s text thus prompts questions of critical practice before place. What can be achieved in taking up a fragmented writing style? This paper investigates the manner in which Gibson reconstructs concepts of place and space in order to challenge contemporary understandings of the Australian nation. It questions whether or not a similar vision of place can be applied in other contexts, and examines the manner in which place comes to be doubled over in the act of reading.' (Publication abstract)
The Sydney Language : William Dawes in Australian Literature Belinda Castles , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Scholar , vol. 3 no. 2 2014;
'Familiar images of Sydney, displaying its sparkling harbour, opera house and bridge, belie the darkness of its short history. For Delia Falconer, in her recent ‘biography’ of Sydney, the city’s ‘fundamental temperament is melancholy’ (2). Over two hundred years of European settlement have brought countless tales of grim encounters in quiet alleys, graves found in the bush, bodies bobbing to the surface of rivers. And there is an older shock, hidden in the landscape, the sudden, calamitous arrival of an alien civilisation. ' (Author's introduction)
Discursive Manipulations of Names and Naming in Kate Grenville's 'The Secret River' Sheila Collingwood-Whittick , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth Essays and Studies , Autumn vol. 36 no. 1 2013; (p. 21-32)
'This article stems from two observations arising from my reading of Kate Grenville's three-part exploration of Anglo-Australia's frontier history. The first is that, contrary to Grenville's averred commitment to telling the unvarnished truth about the modern nation's shameful origins, her recent historical fiction betrays a refractory tendency to portray Australia's past in a sentimental light. The second is that names and the act of naming constitute a dominant strand in the narrative weave of each of the novels. In the discussion that follows I seek to demonstrate the existence of a causal link between these two apparently unrelated observations by showing that a recurrent narratorial emphasis on the affective importance that names of places, people and things assume in the life of the colonial subject constitutes a vital element in the "empathetic history" (Gall 95) of Australia's frontier era that Grenville is intent on creating. Although this analysis can be applied to all three of Grenville's colonial novels, the present article will focus solely on the trilogy's opening volume, The Secret River - the work in which the author's discursive manipulation of names is most transparent and the ideological direction the rest of her frontier saga will follow is clearly signposted.' (Author's abstract)
The Frontier Wars : History and Fiction in Journey to the Stone Country and Landscape of Farewell Shirley Walker , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 156-169)
'There are some stories that must be told lest 'none be left to think of them and shed a tear' (Miller, Landscape, 12). The stories Alex Miller is concerned with in Journey to the Stone Country (2002) and Landscape of Farewell (2007) are those of the Aboriginal massacres which accompanied the invasion of Australia. But he also remind us, in Landscape of Farewell, of all such episodes of mass murder, including the Holocaust, but going back through history to the Trojan Wars and beyond. (Author's introduction 156)
Empathic Deterritorialisation : Re-Mapping the Postcolonial Novel in Creative Writing Classrooms A. Frances Johnson , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'Michael Dodson has commented that the 'repossession of our past is the repossession of ourselves' - yet since the 1980s, the translation of such imperatives within literary and historical colonial archival research has been tightly circumscribed by controversial, often agonistic identity debates. Reflection on the broad emotional imprimateurs guiding intellectual and creative research activity have been muted, variously repressed or backgrounded, voided by (white) shame or tact, and often deferred to Indigenous commentators for framing commentaries. Vehement stoushes between the disciplinary cousins of history and literature have also erupted as part of recent local history and culture wars debates. With hindsight, these seemingly 'emotional' yet supra-rational debates, focusing righteously on entitlement and access to colonial archives, seem to have lacked so-called emotional intelligence and (inter)disciplinary imagination. The arguments of the protagonists have now have been 'tidied away', leaving a subsidence of unscholarly embarrassment in their wake.

I aim to show that despite the problematic inheritance of these public debates, many historians, novelists and cultural critics (Elspeth Probyn, the late Greg Dening, Kate Grenville, Kim Scott and others) have managed to rigorously contest and (re)present colonial archival material without repudiating their own emotional involvement with 'the Australian past' in order to maintain scholarly distance. They have understood, in Marcia Langton's phrase, that 'some of us have lived through it, are living through it. This is not an exercise in historiography alone, and therefore presents problems beyond that of traditional historiography.' My analysis of these writer's commentaries will be contextualised against Langton's idea of intercultural subjectivity, which emphasises a discursive intextuality that can be engaged with equally by black and white artists, critics and writers across the genres. Langton, Dening, Grenville, Scott and others will be shown as thinkers who lead the way in suggesting and/or demonstrating how postcolonial novels can be taught and made.' (Author's abstract)
Writing White, Writing Black, and Events at Canoe Rivulet Catherine McKinnon , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , October vol. 16 no. 2 2012;
'How a community imagines the past contributes to the shaping of its present culture; influences that community's vision for the future. Yet much about the past can be difficult to access, as it can be lost or hidden. Therefore, when retelling first contact stories, especially when the documentary information is limited to a colonial perspective, how might a writer approach fictionalizing historical Indigenous figures? 'Will Martin' (2011), a tale written as part of my practice-led PhD, is a fictional retelling of the eighteenth century sailing trip, taken along the New South Wales coast, by explorers Matthew Flinders, George Bass, and Bass's servant, William Martin. This paper traces my attempts to discover how to approach fictionalizing the historical Indigenous figures that Flinders met. Examining how some non-Indigenous writers have appropriated Indigenous culture and investigating what some writers have said about non-Indigenous writers creating Indigenous characters, provided me with some guidelines. Interviews with Indigenous elders, and other members of the Illawarra community, helped me imagine the gaps in knowledge. In the fictional retelling, using unreliable narration to suggest there may be multiple stories around a single historical event, some of which we may never get to hear, became a useful narrative strategy.' (Author's abstract)
Time for the Timeless Marc McEvoy , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 9 January 2012; (p. 8-9)

— Review of The Vivisector Patrick White 1970 single work novel ; Autumn Laing Alex Miller 2011 single work novel ; The Slap Christos Tsiolkas 2008 single work novel ; Ransom David Malouf 2009 single work novel ; Caleb's Crossing : A Novel Geraldine Brooks 2011 single work novel ; Bereft Chris Womersley 2010 single work novel ; Cloudstreet Tim Winton 1991 single work novel ; That Deadman Dance Kim Scott 2010 single work novel ; The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel ; The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel ; Sarah Thornhill Kate Grenville 2011 single work novel ; The Ballad of Desmond Kale Roger McDonald 2005 single work novel ; Mr Darwin's Shooter Roger McDonald 1998 single work novel
A History in Fiction Miriam Cosic , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian Magazine , 27 -28 August 2011; (p. 31-34)
'The controversy over her most successful novel The Secret River has only hardened Kate Grenville's resolve to tell the stories of Australia's colonial past' (p. 31).
Less Friction, It's Fiction Claire Williams , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The West Australian , 30 August 2011; (p. 7)
Archival Salvage : History’s Reef and the Wreck of the Historical Novel A. Frances Johnson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-21)
'In recent years debates about the ethics of portraying Indigenous subjects and subject matter have almost been superseded by circular debates about 'true' Australian history and who has the right to tell it. This has been disappointing in a context of the morally and formally imaginative speculations of historians such as Tom Griffiths, Fiona Paisley, Stephen Kinnane and Greg Dening, and also in a context of Indigenous studies Professor Marcia Langton's evidently too-hopeful calls for the activation of a shared cultural space. But as this local debate has become more heated, more public, the oddest spectacle of all in recent years was the recent lambasting of historical novelists.

Novelist Kate Grenville was a particular target of attack. Notable historians such as Mark McKenna, John Hirst and Inga Clendinnen vociferously condemned dramatic accounts of the past as anachronistic, unethical and, most curious of all in relation to the fictioneer's job description, untrue. I revisit the 'history wars' stoush to argue that these historians overlooked the suasion of broader, local political battles to determine and culturally enshrine particular narratives of Australian pasts; I argue that they also eschewed the linguistic turn of postmodernism and the contributions made therein by prominent historical scholars in their own field such as Hayden White and Dominic LaCapra. The paper finally shows how Grenville, Kim Scott and other novelists have engaged with colonial archival materials, deploying particular narrative techniques that enable them to generate compelling postcolonial dramatisations of colonial pasts. (Author's abstract)
Irish and Australian Historical Fiction Oona Frawley , Sue Kossew , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 187-206)
'In recent years, in both Australia and Ireland, prominent authors have offered fictional reconsiderations of periods crucial to national consciousness and definition. In Australia, for example, Kate Grenville's work has generated considerable debate about the use of history in fiction, and about the responsibility of the fiction writer to accurately or authentically represent historical events, persons and periods. The project of recovering history and thereby uncovering the nation's past sins can also be identified in other contemporary novels by authors such as Gail Jones and Larissa Behrendt. In Ireland, Roddy Doyle, Joseph O'Connor and Sebastian Barry have been at the forefront of this historical analysis and deployment...' (From author's introduction, 187)
History and the Novel : Refusing to Be Silent Jo Jones , 2010 single work essay
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 55 no. 2 2010; (p. 36-52)
Argues that Australian historical fiction is important in considering the progress of Aboriginal-white relations.
Learning from Each Other : Language, Authority, and Authenticity in Kate Grenville's The Lieutenant Lynette Russell , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lighting Dark Places : Essays on Kate Grenville. 2010; (p. 199-210)
'Lynette Russell, in her essay agrees the 'Grenville's novels can be regarded as part of a process of wider reconciliation. Russell's own lack of Aboriginal language and attempts to learn it have led her to identity strongly with the characters in The Lieutenant and, in her essay on the novel, she argues for a reading that explores the role of language in mediating the friendship between black and white Australia. For, she suggests, the stories from the past which novelists like Grenville have uncovered that deal with both that deal with both positive and negative engagements between settler and Indigenous peoples are 'stories that belong to both" groups, the telling and retelling of which "ought to be seen as an exercise in reconciliation."' ( Kossew, 'Introduction', xx)
y Witnessing Australian Stories : History, Testimony and Memory in Contemporary Culture Kelly Jean Butler , Melbourne : 2010 6037495 2010 single work thesis

'This book is about how Australians have responded to stories about suffering and injustice in Australia, presented in a range of public media, including literature, history, films, and television. Those who have responded are both ordinary and prominent Australians–politicians, writers, and scholars. All have sought to come to terms with Australia's history by responding empathetically to stories of its marginalized citizens.

'Drawing upon international scholarship on collective memory, public history, testimony, and witnessing, this book represents a cultural history of contemporary Australia. It examines the forms of witnessing that dominated Australian public culture at the turn of the millennium. Since the late 1980s, witnessing has developed in Australia in response to the increasingly audible voices of indigenous peoples, migrants, and more recently, asylum seekers. As these voices became public, they posed a challenge not only to scholars and politicians, but also, most importantly, to ordinary citizens.

'When former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd delivered his historic apology to Australia's indigenous peoples in February 2008, he performed an act of collective witnessing that affirmed the testimony and experiences of Aboriginal Australians. The phenomenon of witnessing became crucial, not only to the recognition and reparation of past injustices, but to efforts to create a more cosmopolitan Australia in the present. This is a vital addition to Transactions critically acclaimed Memory and Narrative series.' (Publisher's blurb)

Paperback Row Elsa Dixler , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 17 October 2010; (p. 28)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
Untitled David Pitt , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Booklist , 1 September vol. 107 no. 1 2010; (p. 57)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
Untitled Don Fry , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Virginia Quarterly Review , Spring vol. 86 no. 2 2010; (p. 219)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
Between Cultures Ramona Koval (interviewer), 2009 extract interview (Kate Grenville : The Lieutenant)
— Appears in: Biblio : A Review of Books , November-December vol. 14 no. 11 & 12 2009; (p. 34-36)
Negotiating with the Past Kerryn Goldsworthy , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 27 September 2008; (p. 23)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
On an Uneasy Voyage of Self-Discovery A. P. Riemer , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 27-28 September 2008; (p. 32-33)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
Mirror Image Is Softer Eleanor Limprecht , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 28 September 2008; (p. 11)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
Consuming Taste for Our Early History Matthew Condon , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 20 - 21 September 2008; (p. 20-21)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
Still Not Settled Stella Clarke , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , October vol. 3 no. 9 2008; (p. 3-4)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
Seeds of History Katharine England , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 4 October 2008; (p. 12)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel ; Deception Michael Meehan 2008 single work novel
Accommodating the Past James Bradley , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 305 2008; (p. 24-25)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
First Affinity Lucy Clark , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 12 October 2008; (p. 18)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
Trip into the Past Darkly Nigel Krauth , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 11-12 October 2008; (p. 10-11)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
Review Ian Nichols , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 18 October 2008; (p. 28)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
What Might Have Been Christina Thompson , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Monthly , November no. 40 2008; (p. 68-70)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
What Might Have Been... Margaret Smith , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 5 November no. 438 2008; (p. 53)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
Untitled Anastasia Gonis , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , Summer 2008-2009 vol. 88 no. 5 2008; (p. 24)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
Learning Cadigal Patrick Denman Flanery , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 30 January no. 5522 2009; (p. 20)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
Uplifting Tale of a Quiet Man Who Sees Truth in Words Katy Guest , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Independent , 20 February 2009; (p. 30-31)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
This Year's Work in Fiction 2008-2009 Susan Midalia , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , July vol. 54 no. 1 2009; (p. 51-64)

— Review of The Pages Murray Bail 2008 single work novel ; The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel ; The Spare Room Helen Garner 2008 single work novel ; The Anatomy of Wings Karen Foxlee 2006 single work novel ; Boy On A Wire Jon Doust 2009 single work novel ; The Sinkings Amanda Curtin 2008 single work novel ; Bird Sophie Cunningham 2008 single work novel ; One Foot Wrong Sofie Laguna 2008 single work novel ; Avenue of Eternal Peace Nicholas Jose 1989 single work novel ; Life in Seven Mistakes Susan Johnson 2008 single work novel ; The Steele Diaries Wendy James 2008 single work novel ; Butterfly Sonya Hartnett 2009 single work novel ; Dissection Jacinta Halloran 2007 single work novel ; Fugitive Blue Claire Thomas 2008 single work novel ; Sweet Tracy Ryan 2008 single work novel ; The Virtuoso Sonia Orchard 2009 single work novel ; Ransom David Malouf 2009 single work novel ; The Good Parents Joan London 2008 single work novel ; Vertigo : A Pastoral Amanda Lohrey 2008 single work novella ; The Boat Nam Le 2008 selected work short story ; New Australian Stories 2009 anthology short story ; The Slap Christos Tsiolkas 2008 single work novel
Australian Encounters Alison Mcculloch , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 27 September vol. 114 no. 39 2009; (p. 18)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
An Astronomer's Record of an Intimate Friendship Veronica Thompson , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 23 no. 2 2009; (p. 214-215)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
Time for the Timeless Marc McEvoy , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 9 January 2012; (p. 8-9)

— Review of The Vivisector Patrick White 1970 single work novel ; Autumn Laing Alex Miller 2011 single work novel ; The Slap Christos Tsiolkas 2008 single work novel ; Ransom David Malouf 2009 single work novel ; Caleb's Crossing : A Novel Geraldine Brooks 2011 single work novel ; Bereft Chris Womersley 2010 single work novel ; Cloudstreet Tim Winton 1991 single work novel ; That Deadman Dance Kim Scott 2010 single work novel ; The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel ; The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel ; Sarah Thornhill Kate Grenville 2011 single work novel ; The Ballad of Desmond Kale Roger McDonald 2005 single work novel ; Mr Darwin's Shooter Roger McDonald 1998 single work novel
Paperback Row Elsa Dixler , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 17 October 2010; (p. 28)

— Review of The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel
Just the Spot for their Plots Lynne Minion , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 13 September 2008; (p. 4-5)
A Historical Balancing Act Catherine Keenan , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20-21 September 2008; (p. 30-31) The Age , 20 September 2008; (p. 24-25)
Past Imperfect Rosemary Sorensen , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 20-21 September 2008; (p. 4-5)
British Author Attacks Grenville as Naval Novel Ignites History War Gia Metherell , Diane Stubbings , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 24 September 2008; (p. 3)
Finding the World Within Diane Stubbings , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 27 September 2008; (p. 8)
Lobbing Little Grenades Kathleen Noonan , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 27 - 28 September 2008; (p. 36)
On History's Page Matthew Condon , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 25 October 2008; (p. 13)
Honest about History Danielle Clode , 2008 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , November vol. 3 no. 10 2008; (p. 26)
Between Cultures Ramona Koval (interviewer), 2009 extract interview (Kate Grenville : The Lieutenant)
— Appears in: Biblio : A Review of Books , November-December vol. 14 no. 11 & 12 2009; (p. 34-36)
Kate Grenville : The Lieutenant Ramona Koval (interviewer), 2009 single work interview
— Appears in: ABC News [Online] , January 2009;
History and the Novel : Refusing to Be Silent Jo Jones , 2010 single work essay
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 55 no. 2 2010; (p. 36-52)
Argues that Australian historical fiction is important in considering the progress of Aboriginal-white relations.
Learning from Each Other : Language, Authority, and Authenticity in Kate Grenville's The Lieutenant Lynette Russell , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lighting Dark Places : Essays on Kate Grenville. 2010; (p. 199-210)
'Lynette Russell, in her essay agrees the 'Grenville's novels can be regarded as part of a process of wider reconciliation. Russell's own lack of Aboriginal language and attempts to learn it have led her to identity strongly with the characters in The Lieutenant and, in her essay on the novel, she argues for a reading that explores the role of language in mediating the friendship between black and white Australia. For, she suggests, the stories from the past which novelists like Grenville have uncovered that deal with both that deal with both positive and negative engagements between settler and Indigenous peoples are 'stories that belong to both" groups, the telling and retelling of which "ought to be seen as an exercise in reconciliation."' ( Kossew, 'Introduction', xx)
A History in Fiction Miriam Cosic , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian Magazine , 27 -28 August 2011; (p. 31-34)
'The controversy over her most successful novel The Secret River has only hardened Kate Grenville's resolve to tell the stories of Australia's colonial past' (p. 31).
Less Friction, It's Fiction Claire Williams , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The West Australian , 30 August 2011; (p. 7)
Archival Salvage : History’s Reef and the Wreck of the Historical Novel A. Frances Johnson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-21)
'In recent years debates about the ethics of portraying Indigenous subjects and subject matter have almost been superseded by circular debates about 'true' Australian history and who has the right to tell it. This has been disappointing in a context of the morally and formally imaginative speculations of historians such as Tom Griffiths, Fiona Paisley, Stephen Kinnane and Greg Dening, and also in a context of Indigenous studies Professor Marcia Langton's evidently too-hopeful calls for the activation of a shared cultural space. But as this local debate has become more heated, more public, the oddest spectacle of all in recent years was the recent lambasting of historical novelists.

Novelist Kate Grenville was a particular target of attack. Notable historians such as Mark McKenna, John Hirst and Inga Clendinnen vociferously condemned dramatic accounts of the past as anachronistic, unethical and, most curious of all in relation to the fictioneer's job description, untrue. I revisit the 'history wars' stoush to argue that these historians overlooked the suasion of broader, local political battles to determine and culturally enshrine particular narratives of Australian pasts; I argue that they also eschewed the linguistic turn of postmodernism and the contributions made therein by prominent historical scholars in their own field such as Hayden White and Dominic LaCapra. The paper finally shows how Grenville, Kim Scott and other novelists have engaged with colonial archival materials, deploying particular narrative techniques that enable them to generate compelling postcolonial dramatisations of colonial pasts. (Author's abstract)
Irish and Australian Historical Fiction Oona Frawley , Sue Kossew , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 187-206)
'In recent years, in both Australia and Ireland, prominent authors have offered fictional reconsiderations of periods crucial to national consciousness and definition. In Australia, for example, Kate Grenville's work has generated considerable debate about the use of history in fiction, and about the responsibility of the fiction writer to accurately or authentically represent historical events, persons and periods. The project of recovering history and thereby uncovering the nation's past sins can also be identified in other contemporary novels by authors such as Gail Jones and Larissa Behrendt. In Ireland, Roddy Doyle, Joseph O'Connor and Sebastian Barry have been at the forefront of this historical analysis and deployment...' (From author's introduction, 187)
The Frontier Wars : History and Fiction in Journey to the Stone Country and Landscape of Farewell Shirley Walker , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 156-169)
'There are some stories that must be told lest 'none be left to think of them and shed a tear' (Miller, Landscape, 12). The stories Alex Miller is concerned with in Journey to the Stone Country (2002) and Landscape of Farewell (2007) are those of the Aboriginal massacres which accompanied the invasion of Australia. But he also remind us, in Landscape of Farewell, of all such episodes of mass murder, including the Holocaust, but going back through history to the Trojan Wars and beyond. (Author's introduction 156)
Empathic Deterritorialisation : Re-Mapping the Postcolonial Novel in Creative Writing Classrooms A. Frances Johnson , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'Michael Dodson has commented that the 'repossession of our past is the repossession of ourselves' - yet since the 1980s, the translation of such imperatives within literary and historical colonial archival research has been tightly circumscribed by controversial, often agonistic identity debates. Reflection on the broad emotional imprimateurs guiding intellectual and creative research activity have been muted, variously repressed or backgrounded, voided by (white) shame or tact, and often deferred to Indigenous commentators for framing commentaries. Vehement stoushes between the disciplinary cousins of history and literature have also erupted as part of recent local history and culture wars debates. With hindsight, these seemingly 'emotional' yet supra-rational debates, focusing righteously on entitlement and access to colonial archives, seem to have lacked so-called emotional intelligence and (inter)disciplinary imagination. The arguments of the protagonists have now have been 'tidied away', leaving a subsidence of unscholarly embarrassment in their wake.

I aim to show that despite the problematic inheritance of these public debates, many historians, novelists and cultural critics (Elspeth Probyn, the late Greg Dening, Kate Grenville, Kim Scott and others) have managed to rigorously contest and (re)present colonial archival material without repudiating their own emotional involvement with 'the Australian past' in order to maintain scholarly distance. They have understood, in Marcia Langton's phrase, that 'some of us have lived through it, are living through it. This is not an exercise in historiography alone, and therefore presents problems beyond that of traditional historiography.' My analysis of these writer's commentaries will be contextualised against Langton's idea of intercultural subjectivity, which emphasises a discursive intextuality that can be engaged with equally by black and white artists, critics and writers across the genres. Langton, Dening, Grenville, Scott and others will be shown as thinkers who lead the way in suggesting and/or demonstrating how postcolonial novels can be taught and made.' (Author's abstract)
Writing White, Writing Black, and Events at Canoe Rivulet Catherine McKinnon , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , October vol. 16 no. 2 2012;
'How a community imagines the past contributes to the shaping of its present culture; influences that community's vision for the future. Yet much about the past can be difficult to access, as it can be lost or hidden. Therefore, when retelling first contact stories, especially when the documentary information is limited to a colonial perspective, how might a writer approach fictionalizing historical Indigenous figures? 'Will Martin' (2011), a tale written as part of my practice-led PhD, is a fictional retelling of the eighteenth century sailing trip, taken along the New South Wales coast, by explorers Matthew Flinders, George Bass, and Bass's servant, William Martin. This paper traces my attempts to discover how to approach fictionalizing the historical Indigenous figures that Flinders met. Examining how some non-Indigenous writers have appropriated Indigenous culture and investigating what some writers have said about non-Indigenous writers creating Indigenous characters, provided me with some guidelines. Interviews with Indigenous elders, and other members of the Illawarra community, helped me imagine the gaps in knowledge. In the fictional retelling, using unreliable narration to suggest there may be multiple stories around a single historical event, some of which we may never get to hear, became a useful narrative strategy.' (Author's abstract)
y Witnessing Australian Stories : History, Testimony and Memory in Contemporary Culture Kelly Jean Butler , Melbourne : 2010 6037495 2010 single work thesis

'This book is about how Australians have responded to stories about suffering and injustice in Australia, presented in a range of public media, including literature, history, films, and television. Those who have responded are both ordinary and prominent Australians–politicians, writers, and scholars. All have sought to come to terms with Australia's history by responding empathetically to stories of its marginalized citizens.

'Drawing upon international scholarship on collective memory, public history, testimony, and witnessing, this book represents a cultural history of contemporary Australia. It examines the forms of witnessing that dominated Australian public culture at the turn of the millennium. Since the late 1980s, witnessing has developed in Australia in response to the increasingly audible voices of indigenous peoples, migrants, and more recently, asylum seekers. As these voices became public, they posed a challenge not only to scholars and politicians, but also, most importantly, to ordinary citizens.

'When former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd delivered his historic apology to Australia's indigenous peoples in February 2008, he performed an act of collective witnessing that affirmed the testimony and experiences of Aboriginal Australians. The phenomenon of witnessing became crucial, not only to the recognition and reparation of past injustices, but to efforts to create a more cosmopolitan Australia in the present. This is a vital addition to Transactions critically acclaimed Memory and Narrative series.' (Publisher's blurb)

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