y Lalai (Dreamtime) single work   poetry   "Dreamtime,"
Note: Recounted by Sam Woolagoodjah, Elder of the Worora people, north-west Australia and translated by Andrew Huntley from the prose version of Michael Silverstein.
Issue Details: First known date: 1975 1975
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Notes

  • Told by Sam Woolagoodjah to his son Stanley and his grand-daughter Kerry.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
Text in the Worora language with English translation.
  • Appears in:
    y The New Oxford Book of Australian Verse Les Murray (editor), Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1986 Z427532 1986 anthology poetry Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1986 pg. 1-5
  • Appears in:
    y Anthology of Australian Religious Poetry Les Murray (editor), Blackburn : Collins Dove , 1986 Z212505 1986 anthology poetry Blackburn : Collins Dove , 1986 pg. 196-200
  • Appears in:
    y Ariel vol. 19 no. 2 April 1988 Z925658 1988 periodical issue 1988 pg. 47-52
  • Appears in:
    y The New Oxford Book of Australian Verse Les Murray (editor), Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1986 Z427532 1986 anthology poetry South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1996 pg. 1-5
  • Appears in:
    y Wisdom from the Earth : The Living Legacy of the Aboriginal Dreamtime Anna Voigt (editor), Neville Stuart Drury (editor), East Roseville : Simon and Schuster , 1997 7374023 1997 anthology art work non-fiction

    'Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures are the oldest continuous living traditions on Earth. This book celebrates the deeply felt relationships between these Aboriginal peoples, the land, and their sacred heritage of the Dreamtime. All aspects of Aboriginal life derive their ultimate context from the Dreamtime—the primordial creation epoch that Aborigines have reenacted in ceremony since time immemorial—and from the essence they share with their Spirit Ancestors. This sacred source, known as the Law, underlies every activity of these people, fills all aspects of daily life with sacred purpose, and creates an enduring sense of connection for them to the land and to each other. Myth, kinship, song, dance and ceremony are all interwoven within a spiritual tradition that extends back into the timeless past and forward into an eternal future. Women and men occupy distinctly separate yet complementary spheres, each with its own unique traditions. And rituals celebrate every transition in life—from conception and birth, through entry into adulthood, to the ceremonies that make up "women's business" and "men's business," to the various stages of maturation, old age, and death. Wisdom from the Earth illuminates many facets of Aboriginal cultures and explores a number of the major Dreamtime songlines, ceremonies, and other spiritual practices, through eighty-two stunning color photographs accompanied by text—including some unforgettable dialogues with Aboriginal elders.' (Source: Amazon website)

    Wisdom from the Earth contains the work and comments of David Mowaljarli, Stephen Page, Pat Dodsonl), James Barripang, Guboo Ted Thomas, Jutta Malnic, Galarrwuy Yunupingu, Mudrooroo, Eddie Kneebone, Nganyinytja, Muta, Yami Lester, Anne Pattel-Gray, Bill NeidjieLg), Sam Woolagoodjah, Oodgeroo Noonuccal, Felix Holmes, and Yidumduma Bill Harney.

    Boston : Shambhala Publications , 1998
    pg. 56-57

Works about this Work

Dragon Fly, Mareka and Lindy : The Minority Child as Chooser in Three Australian Narratives Don Pemberton , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ariel , April vol. 19 no. 2 1988; (p. 33-52)
Compares three Australian narratives which (1) focus on a child who must contemplate the gap between two cultures; and (2) give central significance to an act of choice by the child.
Dragon Fly, Mareka and Lindy : The Minority Child as Chooser in Three Australian Narratives Don Pemberton , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ariel , April vol. 19 no. 2 1988; (p. 33-52)
Compares three Australian narratives which (1) focus on a child who must contemplate the gap between two cultures; and (2) give central significance to an act of choice by the child.
Last amended 16 Sep 2010 11:37:56
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  • Kimberley area, North Western Australia, Western Australia,
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