A Nyungar Is Battling single work   life story  
Issue Details: First known date: 2007 2007
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Speaking from the Heart : Stories of Life, Family and Country Sally Morgan (editor), Tjalaminu Mia (editor), Blaze Kwaymullina (editor), North Fremantle : Fremantle Press , 2007 Z1386813 2007 anthology life story poetry (taught in 1 units) 'Eighteen Aboriginal Australians from across the country each share a powerful story which is central to their own lives, and to their family, community or country. Speaking from the Heart provides readers with a very personal picture of the history, culture and contemporary experience of Aboriginal Australia.' (Source: Publisher's blurb) North Fremantle : Fremantle Press , 2007 pg. 95-108

Works about this Work

Biopolitical Correspondences : Settler Nationalism, Thanatopolitics, and the Perils of Hybridity Michael R. Griffiths , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 20-42)
'How does (post)colonial literary culture, so often annexed to nationalist concerns, interface with what Michel Foucalt called biopolitics? Biopolitics can be defined as the regularisation of a population according to the perceived insistence on norms. Indeed, biopolitics is crucially concerned with what is perceptible at the macroscopic level of an entire population - often rendering its operations blind to more singular, small, identitarian, or even communitarian representations and imaginaries. Unlike the diffuse, microscopic, governmental mechanisms of surveillance that identify the need for disciplinary interventions, biopolitics concerns itself with the regularisation of societies on a large scale, notably through demography. As Ann Laura Stoler has put it, Foucault's identification of these two forms of power, 'the disciplining of individual bodies...and the regularization of life processes of aggregate human populations' has led to much productive work in the postcolonialist critique of 'the discursive management of the sexual practices of the colonized', and the resultant 'colonial order of things' (4).' (Author's introduction, 20)
Biopolitical Correspondences : Settler Nationalism, Thanatopolitics, and the Perils of Hybridity Michael R. Griffiths , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 20-42)
'How does (post)colonial literary culture, so often annexed to nationalist concerns, interface with what Michel Foucalt called biopolitics? Biopolitics can be defined as the regularisation of a population according to the perceived insistence on norms. Indeed, biopolitics is crucially concerned with what is perceptible at the macroscopic level of an entire population - often rendering its operations blind to more singular, small, identitarian, or even communitarian representations and imaginaries. Unlike the diffuse, microscopic, governmental mechanisms of surveillance that identify the need for disciplinary interventions, biopolitics concerns itself with the regularisation of societies on a large scale, notably through demography. As Ann Laura Stoler has put it, Foucault's identification of these two forms of power, 'the disciplining of individual bodies...and the regularization of life processes of aggregate human populations' has led to much productive work in the postcolonialist critique of 'the discursive management of the sexual practices of the colonized', and the resultant 'colonial order of things' (4).' (Author's introduction, 20)
Last amended 8 Oct 2009 12:03:05
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