y Monsoon single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2007 2007
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Monsson 'is a journey into the hearts and memories of those caught in a certain time in a particular place.

'Sandy Donaldson has been working for a volunteer organisation in Vietnam for the past four years. As her contract nears it end, she is reluctant to leave so she invites her oldest friend, Anna, to come for a holiday and discover its beautiful tourist destinations.

'Both girls have unexplored links to this country. Sandy's father is a Vietnam vet and Anna's mother was a Vietnamese boat person.

'During their travels, they meet Tom, an old Australian journalist who covered the war and plans to report on the 40th anniversary of the Battle of Long Tan. It is Tom who tries to persuade Sandy's father to return to Long Tan and settle the ghosts that have haunted him for 40 years, and suggests that Anna should delve into her mother's past.

'But the girls are reluctant, swept up in their own concerns, relationships, and a business deal that has the potential to go horribly wrong. However, it is the near-blind Buddhist nun living alone in the pagoda atop one of the karsts in Halong Bay who might hold the key.' (Publisher's blurb)

Notes

  • Dedication: Dedicated to Jim Revitt; my uncle, mentor and mate, who covered the Vietnam war for the Australian Broadcasting Commission 1966-67. Thanks for everything Jimbo!

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Australians and the Pacific Rim : The Contested Past in the Popular Fiction of Di Morrissey Rebecca Ling , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , vol. 2 no. 2 2013; (p. 211-220)
'Former print and television journalist Di Morrissey is Australia's biggest-selling writer of popular fiction. Her novels incrementally construct an Australia re-shaped for the new century through the interplay of significant social forces and demographic shifts. Her imaginary also places Australian culture within a global network of affiliations generated by the colonial and imperial past, as well as by more recent strategic alliances, and encompasses some of the darker elements of Australia's collective inheritance. The critical reception of Morrissey's work, however, has hitherto been scant and dismissive. Yet the Pacific Rim novels - Tears of the Moon, Scatter the Stars, Kimberley Sun, Monsoon, and The Plantation - can be read within perspectives afforded by dark tourism research and theories of cognitive dissonance, revealing that they subvert widely received understandings of Australia's relationships within the Pacific region and constitute a subliminal force for public education.' (Author's abstract 211)
Review Ian Nichols , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 2 February 2008; (p. 42)

— Review of Monsoon Di Morrissey 2007 single work novel
Off the Shelf : Fiction Dianne Dempsey , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 17 November 2007; (p. 28)

— Review of Monsoon Di Morrissey 2007 single work novel
Off the Shelf : Fiction Dianne Dempsey , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 17 November 2007; (p. 28)

— Review of Monsoon Di Morrissey 2007 single work novel
Review Ian Nichols , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 2 February 2008; (p. 42)

— Review of Monsoon Di Morrissey 2007 single work novel
Australians and the Pacific Rim : The Contested Past in the Popular Fiction of Di Morrissey Rebecca Ling , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , vol. 2 no. 2 2013; (p. 211-220)
'Former print and television journalist Di Morrissey is Australia's biggest-selling writer of popular fiction. Her novels incrementally construct an Australia re-shaped for the new century through the interplay of significant social forces and demographic shifts. Her imaginary also places Australian culture within a global network of affiliations generated by the colonial and imperial past, as well as by more recent strategic alliances, and encompasses some of the darker elements of Australia's collective inheritance. The critical reception of Morrissey's work, however, has hitherto been scant and dismissive. Yet the Pacific Rim novels - Tears of the Moon, Scatter the Stars, Kimberley Sun, Monsoon, and The Plantation - can be read within perspectives afforded by dark tourism research and theories of cognitive dissonance, revealing that they subvert widely received understandings of Australia's relationships within the Pacific region and constitute a subliminal force for public education.' (Author's abstract 211)
Last amended 28 May 2010 15:32:09
Settings:
  • c
    Vietnam,
    c
    Southeast Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
  • Ha Long Bay,
    c
    Vietnam,
    c
    Southeast Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X