Storm Boy extract   children's fiction   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 1988 1988
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Notes

  • Translation of the section, 'Mr Percival and the Shipwreck'.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: Stormknabo
Language: Esperanto
  • Appears in:
    y Australia Antologio Alan Towsey (editor), Pisa : Edistudio , 1988 Z1200264 1988 anthology poetry novel prose short story Anthology of poems and extracts from literary works by Australian authors, translated by various people into Esperanto. Works have been indexed if the extract could be positively identified. Other translations include the works of Charles Harpur, Rolf Boldrewood, Henry Kendall, Joseph Furphy, Marcus Clarke, Henry Lawson, Steele Rudd, Christopher Brennan, Walter Murdoch, C. E. W. Bean, Frank Dalby Davison, R. D. Fitzgerald, Douglas Stewart, David Campbell, Donald Horne, Dick Roughsey, Peter Carey, Robert Drewe, Andrew Lansdown and Peter Dodds McCormick. Pisa : Edistudio , 1988 pg. 313-321

Works about this Work

Australian Youth Literature and the Formation of Contemporary Australian Cultural Identity Bhim S Dahiya , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: IJAS , vol. 1 no. 1 2008; (p. 21-31)
Quite like the American literature in the 1830s, the Australian literature almost a century afterwards displayed an urges to carve out its own identity. Like Emerson and Thoreau, Hawthorne and Melville, Whitman and Mark Twain, the Australian writers of the early phase focused on where they saw marks of distinction, defining the new nation as a nation of their won, their own land.
Australian Youth Literature and the Formation of Contemporary Australian Cultural Identity Bhim S Dahiya , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: IJAS , vol. 1 no. 1 2008; (p. 21-31)
Quite like the American literature in the 1830s, the Australian literature almost a century afterwards displayed an urges to carve out its own identity. Like Emerson and Thoreau, Hawthorne and Melville, Whitman and Mark Twain, the Australian writers of the early phase focused on where they saw marks of distinction, defining the new nation as a nation of their won, their own land.
Last amended 12 Dec 2013 07:48:40
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