Issue Details: First known date: 2007 2007
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

David Sornig explores the idea that Andrew McCann's Subtopia and Christos Tsiolkas's Dead Europe render 'versions of Berlin, and engage the narrative uncertainty of the fall of the Berlin Wall in a way that can be read to follow from Derrida's exploration of the logic of the ghost, the hauntology he describes in Specters of Marx, which suggests that the presence of the past should be interrogated not as a final post-Historical object, as Fukuyama [in The End of History and The Last Man] might suggest, but rather as this heterogeneous inheritance, as multiple as its iterations'.

Sornig discusses the ways in which McCann's and Tsiolkas's narratives 'weigh the eschatological status of Berlin'.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Antipodes vol. 21 no. 1 June 2007 Z1410909 2007 periodical issue 2007 pg. 67-71

Works about this Work

'What's Haunting Dead Europe?' Trauma Fiction as a Reaction to Postmodern Governmentality Michael Vaughan , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 11 no. 2 2011;
'The ghosts of Christos Tsiolkas' Dead Europe have been a key focus of its critical reception. This article offers an alternative reading of these ghosts, arguing that Tsiolkas writes trauma fiction to challenge the totalising discourse of postmodern governmentality, to assert the impossibility of an end to history, and to write fiction which haunts its readers to enact an ethical relationship with the traumatic past.' (Author's abstract)
'What's Haunting Dead Europe?' Trauma Fiction as a Reaction to Postmodern Governmentality Michael Vaughan , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 11 no. 2 2011;
'The ghosts of Christos Tsiolkas' Dead Europe have been a key focus of its critical reception. This article offers an alternative reading of these ghosts, arguing that Tsiolkas writes trauma fiction to challenge the totalising discourse of postmodern governmentality, to assert the impossibility of an end to history, and to write fiction which haunts its readers to enact an ethical relationship with the traumatic past.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 29 Aug 2007 12:37:59
Subjects:
  • Berlin,
    c
    Germany,
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
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