4235538972912765439.jpg
Cover image courtesy the publisher.
y Benang : From the Heart single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1999 1999
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Oceanic in its rhythms and understanding, brilliant in its use of language and image, moving in its largeness of spirit, compelling in its narrative scope and style, Benang is a novel of celebration and lament, of beginning and return, of obliteration and recovery, of silencing and of powerful utterance. Both tentative and daring, it speaks to the present and a possible future through stories, dreams, rhythms, songs, images and documents mobilised from the incompletely acknowledged and still dynamic past.' (Publisher's website)

Notes

  • Other formats: Also braille, e-book, and electronic source.
  • Other formats: Also large print.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Fremantle, Fremantle area, South West Perth, Perth, Western Australia,: Fremantle Press , 1999 .
      4235538972912765439.jpg
      Cover image courtesy the publisher.
      Extent: 500p.
      Description: illus., port.
      Reprinted: 2005 , 2009 , 2002 , 2001
      ISBN: 9781863682404 (pbk), 1863682406 (pbk)
    • North Fremantle, Fremantle area, South West Perth, Perth, Western Australia,: Fremantle Press , 2017 .
      Extent: 1vp.
      Edition info: 2nd edition
      Note/s:
      • Projected publication date: March 2017
      ISBN: 9781925164442
Language: French
Notes:
Titled As: Benang /​ Kim Scott ; Roman Traduit de L'anglais (Australie) par Pierre Girard.
Notes:
Alternative Titled: Benang. French.
    • Arles,
      c
      France,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Actes Sud , 2002 .
      Extent: 471p.
      ISBN: 2742738134

Works about this Work

Fever in the Archive Anna Haebich , single work criticism
— Appears in: Humanities Australia , no. 5 2014; (p. 23-35)

Anna Haebich investigates how the West Australian Department of Indigenous Affairs archives (1898-1972) have been utilised by Indigenous writers/researchers.

form y Kim Scott Lecture Edith Cowan University, Kurongkurl Katitjin School of Indigenous Australian Studies , Perth : Edith Cowan University, Kurongkurl Katitjin School of Indigenous Australian Studies , 2001 8612083 single work film/TV criticism

Kim discusses some of the processes that he used to research, draft and edit Benang.

y Ice Dreaming : Reading Whitemess in Kim Scott's Benang : from the Heart Kristyn Evelyn Harman , Tasmania : 2004 8612232 single work thesis

'Through a close reading of Kim Scott's Benang: from the heart, this thesis interrogates what whiteness in an Australian colonial context looks like from an Aboriginal perspective. Its central proposition is that Scott's narrator, Harley, discovers whiteness as a consequence of discovering his Aboriginality...' (Source: Abstract)

Literature as Protest and Solace : The Verse of Alf Taylor Danica Cerce , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 16 2015; (p. 25-33)

'Although Australian indigenous poetry is often overtly polemical and politically committed, any reading which analyzes it as mere propaganda is too narrow to do it justice. By presenting the verse of Alf Taylor collected in Singer Songwriter (1992) and Winds (1994) and discussing it in the context of the wider social and cultural milieu of the author, my essay aims to show the thematic richness of indigenous poetic expression. Indigenous poets have, on the one hand, undertaken the responsibility to strive for social and political equality and foster within their communities the very important concept that indigenous peoples can survive only as a community and a nation (McGuiness). On the other hand, they have produced powerful self-revelatory accounts of their own mental and emotional interior, which urges us to see their careers in a perspective much wider than that of social chroniclers and rebels.' (Publication abstract)

Archival Poetics : Writing History from the Fragments Camilla Nelson , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , April no. 28 2015;
'This paper examines ‘archival poetics’ in contemporary history and fiction writing, with a focus on Mark McKenna’s An eye for eternity: The life of Manning Clark, Megan Marshall’s Margaret Fuller: A new American life and Kim Scott’s Benang, from the heart. It investigates the ways in which the authors of these works move away from the forensic imaginary embodied in a certain kind of historiography’s approach to the archive, to create a more personal, powerful and situated kind of history writing. It argues that these works suggest that history is less about the sublime chaos of the past – which cannot be narrated without duplicity, damage or violence – than how we engage the past, which is, on reflection, an entirely different thing.' (Publication summary)
Dissident Laughter : Historiographic Metafiction as Parodic Intervention in Benang and That Deadman Dance A. Frances Johnson , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : Special Issue Website Series , October no. 33 2015;
'Benang: From the Heart and That Deadman Dance are both seminal examples of postcolonial historical novels by Kim Scott that consider ‘how much speaking’ and ‘what sort of speaking’ can occur in relation to portrayals of Indigenous subjects and traumatic histories of dispossession. Both Scott’s novels differently recruit a range of parodic narrative techniques to critique the monologistic language of colonialism. This essay examines how Scott recruits historiographic metafiction in Benang: From the Heart and That Deadman Dance to generate new metaphors of colonial power relations within the novel as heteroglossic text.' (Publication abstract)
Critical Whiteness and Australian Aboriginal Novels Xing Chunli , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oceanic Literary Studies , no. 2 2015; (p. 14-31)
'Since the 1990s, Critical Whiteness Studies has become established as an interdisciplinary field. Centering round the critique of whiteness as a socially constructed ideology, it has led race studies into a new historical stage. It encompasses multiple fields in humanities and social sciences, while furnishing new perspectives for literary studies. Drawing in the theories of Critical Whiteness Studies, this paper focuses on the analyses of two historical novels by the Aboriginal writers in Australia, Eric Wilmott's Pemulwuy and Kim Scott's Benang : From the Heart. Resorting to distinct discursive strategies, the two novels have attempted to render whiteness visible and subvert the hegemonic historical narrative constructed by the colonizers. In the meantime, the novels have aired the collective appeals of the Aboriginal people and reconstructed from the Aboriginal perspective the Australian history disrupted by the colonial invasion.. (14-15)
The Study of Contemporary Australian Aboriginal Literature in China Ying Qiong , 2015 single work
— Appears in: Oceanic Literary Studies , no. 2 2015; (p. 236-247)
'Australian Aboriginal literature, a unique genre in Australian Literature, has greatly contributed to its diversity and colorfulness. Its status has improved because of the awaking of Aboriginal people and constant emerging of Aboriginal writers. This paper emphatically probes into three stages, reviews the Australian Aboriginal literature studies in China and discusses some of the major characteristics. Remarkable achievements have been made in the past thirty years, but there still exist some problems, including inadequate sense of Aboriginality, lack of diachronic and holistic study of a writer's thoughts, inadequate research on the works of Aboriginal writers born after the 1960s.' (236-237)
Book Clubs and Reconciliation : A Pilot Study on Book Clubs Reading the ‘Fictions of Reconciliation’ Robert Clarke , Marguerite Nolan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , May no. 56 2014;
Kim Scott’s Benang : From the Heart Marion Campbell , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Poetic Revolutionaries : Intertextuality and Subversion 2014;
Reading Australia from Distant Shores Jennifer Wawrzinek , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 28 no. 1 2014; (p. 18-22, 257)
'A a doctoral candidate working in Australian Studies, Wawrzinek shares the difficulty to find quality Australian literature in Europe, particularly in Paris and in Berlin. With the increasing availability of ebooks via download,she is hoping that it will become easier to include lesser known Australian writers on reading lists in the European university and to access material that otherwise takes months to arrive via conventional methods of transportation. She says a sustained, ongoing program to support Australian authors, to speak about their work, and to engage in collaborative programs with European scholars and artists is needed to show the world that Australia is not just about Kangaroos and beautiful beaches.' (Publication summary)
Finding a Place in Story : Kim Scott’s Writing and the Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project Natalie Quinlivann , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;

'In True Country, the narrator draws the reader close and says, “You listen to me. We’re gunna make a story, true story. You might find it’s here you belong. A place like this.” (15) Although the narrator speaks of ‘(a) place like this’ as “a beautiful place (…). Call it our country, our country all ‘round here” (15), belonging, for the reader, for the characters in each of Scott’s novels, and for Scott himself, is more than settling into a physical environment, belonging is finding a place in the story.

'Mamang, Noongar Mambara Bakitj, Dwoort Baal Kaat, and Yira Boornak Nyininy are major achievements in Scott and The Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project’s process of returning, restoring and rejuvenating language and story within the Noongar community and for an ever-widening public. In their form, content and intent, the stories renegotiate ideas of place and placement, confronting personal, cultural and linguistic dislocations in Noongar lives as well as an ambivalent narrative landscape in which language and story are central to both a lingering colonialism and the process of decolonisation.' (Publication abstract)

Australian Lit. Ramona Koval , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: World Literature Today , 1 May vol. 88 no. 3/4 2014; (p. 6)

— Review of The Watch Tower Elizabeth Harrower 1966 single work novel ; Romulus, My Father Raimond Gaita 1998 single work biography ; Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel ; The Narrow Road to the Deep North Richard Flanagan 2013 single work novel
Connections and Integration : Oral Traditions/Quantum Paradigm Dolors Collellmir Morales , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 10 2013;
'This paper begins by mentioning the deep connections between art and science and how these connections, which in certain periods of time had been practically ignored, have recently received much consideration. The present attention comes from specialists in different fields of science and humanities and the conclusions/solutions that they bring can be regarded as means of integrating. The paper briefly refers to examples in the visual arts which illustrate Einstein's discovery of the double nature of light. Then it focuses on the possible relationships between literature and quantum mechanics. The novels Potiki and Benang, both from the Pacific region, are good examples to help us realize that notions concerning space-time that had been part of indigenous knowledge for centuries are now validated by recent scientific discoveries: the uncertainty principle and the principle of no-locality among others. Thus, native literatures that had been analysed in the frame of the traditions of their respective cultures, or even within the parameters of magic realism, can now acquire a new and stimulating dimension.' (Author's abstract)
Kim Scott Dom Amerena , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Lifted Brow , no. 16 2013; (p. 46)
Benang : A Worldly Book Roger Osborne , Gillian Whitlock , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 13 no. 3 2013;
'This article draws on recent trends in Australian literary criticism to scan new horizons for readings of Kim Scott’s novel Benang and, more generally, to consider the networks that shape various scenes of reading and interpretive communities for the production and reception of Australian Indigenous writing.' (Publication abstract)
Empathic Deterritorialisation : Re-Mapping the Postcolonial Novel in Creative Writing Classrooms A. Frances Johnson , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'Michael Dodson has commented that the 'repossession of our past is the repossession of ourselves' - yet since the 1980s, the translation of such imperatives within literary and historical colonial archival research has been tightly circumscribed by controversial, often agonistic identity debates. Reflection on the broad emotional imprimateurs guiding intellectual and creative research activity have been muted, variously repressed or backgrounded, voided by (white) shame or tact, and often deferred to Indigenous commentators for framing commentaries. Vehement stoushes between the disciplinary cousins of history and literature have also erupted as part of recent local history and culture wars debates. With hindsight, these seemingly 'emotional' yet supra-rational debates, focusing righteously on entitlement and access to colonial archives, seem to have lacked so-called emotional intelligence and (inter)disciplinary imagination. The arguments of the protagonists have now have been 'tidied away', leaving a subsidence of unscholarly embarrassment in their wake.

I aim to show that despite the problematic inheritance of these public debates, many historians, novelists and cultural critics (Elspeth Probyn, the late Greg Dening, Kate Grenville, Kim Scott and others) have managed to rigorously contest and (re)present colonial archival material without repudiating their own emotional involvement with 'the Australian past' in order to maintain scholarly distance. They have understood, in Marcia Langton's phrase, that 'some of us have lived through it, are living through it. This is not an exercise in historiography alone, and therefore presents problems beyond that of traditional historiography.' My analysis of these writer's commentaries will be contextualised against Langton's idea of intercultural subjectivity, which emphasises a discursive intextuality that can be engaged with equally by black and white artists, critics and writers across the genres. Langton, Dening, Grenville, Scott and others will be shown as thinkers who lead the way in suggesting and/or demonstrating how postcolonial novels can be taught and made.' (Author's abstract)
Empathic Deterritorialisation : Re-Mapping the Postcolonial Novel in Creative Writing Classrooms A. Frances Johnson , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'Michael Dodson has commented that the 'repossession of our past is the repossession of ourselves' - yet since the 1980s, the translation of such imperatives within literary and historical colonial archival research has been tightly circumscribed by controversial, often agonistic identity debates. Reflection on the broad emotional imprimateurs guiding intellectual and creative research activity have been muted, variously repressed or backgrounded, voided by (white) shame or tact, and often deferred to Indigenous commentators for framing commentaries. Vehement stoushes between the disciplinary cousins of history and literature have also erupted as part of recent local history and culture wars debates. With hindsight, these seemingly 'emotional' yet supra-rational debates, focusing righteously on entitlement and access to colonial archives, seem to have lacked so-called emotional intelligence and (inter)disciplinary imagination. The arguments of the protagonists have now have been 'tidied away', leaving a subsidence of unscholarly embarrassment in their wake.

I aim to show that despite the problematic inheritance of these public debates, many historians, novelists and cultural critics (Elspeth Probyn, the late Greg Dening, Kate Grenville, Kim Scott and others) have managed to rigorously contest and (re)present colonial archival material without repudiating their own emotional involvement with 'the Australian past' in order to maintain scholarly distance. They have understood, in Marcia Langton's phrase, that 'some of us have lived through it, are living through it. This is not an exercise in historiography alone, and therefore presents problems beyond that of traditional historiography.' My analysis of these writer's commentaries will be contextualised against Langton's idea of intercultural subjectivity, which emphasises a discursive intextuality that can be engaged with equally by black and white artists, critics and writers across the genres. Langton, Dening, Grenville, Scott and others will be shown as thinkers who lead the way in suggesting and/or demonstrating how postcolonial novels can be taught and made.' (Author's abstract)
Reading Closely : Writing (and) Family History in Kim Scott’s 'Benang' Nadine Attewell , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Text , vol. 7 no. 3 2012;
'Recently, scholars dissatisfied with accounts that assume the novelty of indigenous literary production have drawn attention to the depth and breadth of indigenous writing traditions. This essay reflects on the stakes and implications of such genealogical projects through a reading of Aboriginal writer Kim Scott’s novel Benang, about the effects of Australian state-sponsored intervention into Aboriginal intimate and family life. Noting the extent to which Scott’s narrative foregrounds Aboriginal engagements with the written word, I suggest that Benang frames writing as at once a medium through which to reconnect with family, and itself a fraught family legacy. If indigenous authorship has been taken to constitute a form of self-determination, and reading this writing an exercise in “intellectual sovereignty,” Benang invites us, I argue, to specify the political charge of reading as inhering (at least partly) in the uncomfortable intimacies the act entails and provokes.' [Author's abstract]
Emotion, Motive, Narrative : Finding Heartland in Kim Scott’s Benang and Peter Carey’s Jack Maggs Victoria Genevieve Reeve , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 3 2012;
'In this essay, I want to explore the possibility that the success of narrative in stimulating empathy comes from the relation that narrative bears to emotion—where emotion is a kind of proto-narrative that possibly accounts for the structure and range of narratives themselves —and that our familiarity with emotions as micro-narratives results in the motivation of narrative. That is, the resolution of events occurs in terms of feeling rather than other forms of closure, since other forms of closure represent literal endings as, quite simply, the cessation of events whereas emotion achieves its end by being felt or translated in empathetic terms and in ways that endure beyond the formality of the fictive event that ends the narrative. I will be using Kim Scott's Benang: From the Heart (1999) and Peter Carey's Jack Maggs (1997) to discuss narrative and emotions, or the role of emotion in motivating narrative events and the role of narrative in conveying and stirring emotion in the reader.' (Author's abstract)
"Benang : From the Heart" Gordon Briscoe , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: Aboriginal History , vol. 21 no. 1997; (p. 228-240)

— Review of Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel
The Pain of Finding One's Voice Jennifer Moran , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 20 March 1999; (p. 24)

— Review of Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel
Colour My World : Fighting Free from the Virtual Prison of Race Gerry Turcotte , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 19 June 1999; (p. 9)

— Review of Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel
Nyoongar Man John Donnelly , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June no. 211 1999; (p. 29-30)

— Review of Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel
New Indigenous Fiction Anita Heiss , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , Winter vol. 59 no. 2 1999; (p. 191-196)

— Review of Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel ; Black Angels, Red Blood Steven McCarthy 1998 single work novel
Untitled Carly Chynoweth , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian's Review of Books , June vol. 4 no. 5 1999; (p. 24-25)

— Review of Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel
Untitled Jan Teagle Kapetas , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , Winter vol. 44 no. 2 1999; (p. 128-131)

— Review of Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel
Benang Philip Morrissey , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin : Fine Writing and Provocative Ideas , vol. 59 no. 1 2000; (p. 198-200)

— Review of Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel
For the Last Reader Lesley Chow , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 5 January no. 5101 2001; (p. 20)

— Review of Drylands : A Book for the World's Last Reader Thea Astley 1999 single work novel ; Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel
Untitled Roberta Buffi , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , vol. 12 no. 3 2000; (p. 125-128)

— Review of Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel
Acts of Noticing : A Consideration of Some Recent Australian Fiction Carmel MacDonald-Grahame , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 45 no. 2000; (p. 23-36)

— Review of The Red Heart Rosie Scott 1999 selected work essay autobiography ; Untold Tales David Malouf 1999 selected work short story ; Dream Stuff David Malouf 2000 selected work short story ; Blue : a novel Ken Spillman 1999 single work novel ; Freedom Highway Nigel Krauth 1999 single work novel ; The Chelsea Manifesto : A Novel Bruce L. Russell 1999 single work novel ; Painted Words 1999 anthology short story poetry ; Liv : A Novel Morgan Yasbincek 2000 single work novel ; Hidden from View Richard Harland 1999 single work novel ; Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel ; Drylands : A Book for the World's Last Reader Thea Astley 1999 single work novel ; An Accommodating Spouse Elizabeth Jolley 1999 single work novel ; Neap Tide Dorothy Hewett 1999 single work novel ; Isobel on the Way to the Corner Shop Amy Witting 1999 single work novel ; Poe's Cat Brenda Walker 1999 single work novel ; Playing Madame Mao Lau Siew Mei 2000 single work novel ; The Hunter Julia Leigh 1999 single work novel ; The Australian Fiance Simone Lazaroo 2000 single work novel
Whose Image? Whose Mirror? Marilyn Strelau , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 14 no. 2 2000; (p. 163-165)

— Review of Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel ; Night Song and Other Poems John Muk Muk Burke 1999 selected work poetry
"Benang : From the Heart" : 'I Found Myself Among Paper' Lisa Slater , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 61 no. 1 2001; (p. 220-226)

— Review of Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel
Australian Lit. Ramona Koval , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: World Literature Today , 1 May vol. 88 no. 3/4 2014; (p. 6)

— Review of The Watch Tower Elizabeth Harrower 1966 single work novel ; Romulus, My Father Raimond Gaita 1998 single work biography ; Benang : From the Heart Kim Scott 1999 single work novel ; The Narrow Road to the Deep North Richard Flanagan 2013 single work novel
Making Strange Men : Resistance and Reconciliation in Kim Scott's Benang Lisa Slater , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Resistance and Reconciliation : Writing in the Commonwealth 2003; (p. 358-370)
Shouting Back : Kathryn Trees Talks to Kim Scott about His Writing Kathryn Trees (interviewer), 1995 single work interview
— Appears in: Fremantle Arts Review , August/September vol. 10 no. 1 1995; (p. 20-21)
'The First White Man Born' : Miscegenation and Identity in Kim Scott's Benang Tony Birch , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Imagining Australia : Literature and Culture in the New New World 2004; (p. 137-157)
Elder Tells Her People's Story Jodi Hoffmann , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 10 August no. 357 2005; (p. 27)
Kim Scott's Benang : Monstrous (Textual) Bodies Lisa Slater , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 65 no. 1 2005; (p. 63-73)
Slater contends that 'Throughout Benang, Scott suggests that it is the body's openness to the environment that unsettled the colonisers and made them determine that to establish and maintain sovereignty it was necessary to make a white nation.'
Kim Scott's Benang : An Ethics of Uncertainty Lisa Slater , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 4 no. 2005; (p. 147-158)
Issues of writing, language and power are central to Kim Scott's Benang. Lisa Slater identifies some of the ethical difficulties faced by Scott in writing Benang ... before discussing some of the narrative strategies Scott employs to destabilise fixed notions of identity and open up a space for cross-cultural dialogue ' (Editorial p. 9).
Country and Connections : An Overview of the Writing of Kim Scott John Fielder , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Altitude , no. 6 2005;
Benang, this 'Most Local of Histories' : Annexing Colonial Records into a World without End Lisa Slater , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Commonwealth Literature , vol. 41 no. 1 2006; (p. 51-68)
The article 'examines Kim Scott's novel Benang as a counter-history and an ethics of speech, which participates in a regeneration of Nyoongar cultural knowledge. ... Scott has composed Benang both to question the adequacy of the novel, and the English language, to represent Indigeneity, and to propose a style of writing that generates new speaking positions for Indigenous people' (51).
Cross-Cultural Alliances : Exploring Aboriginal Asian Literary and Cultural Production Peta Stephenson , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lost in the Whitewash : Aboriginal-Asian Encounters in Australia, 1901-2001 2003; (p. 143-162)
Peta Stephenson surveys Aboriginal-Asian cross-cultural production, considering representations of Aboriginal-Asian relations, influences on the construction of contemporary Aboriginality, and Aboriginal perceptions of Asian identity.
Strangers at Home Kim Scott , 2007 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Translating Lives : Living with Two Languages and Cultures 2007; (p. 1-11)
Disgrace, Benang , and the Search for Benevolence Paul Newman , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 85 2005; (p. 83-96, notes 209-211)
Discusses J. M. Coetzee's Disgrace and Kim Scott's Benang.
Australia Re-Mapped and Con-Texted in Kim Scott's Benang Pablo Armellino , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Pain of Unbelonging : Alienation and Identity in Australasian Literature 2007; (p. 15-36)
Indigenous Writing/Indigenous Politics : Rights, Writers and Kim Scott's 'Benang' Delys Bird , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reconciliations 2005; (p. 109-118) Australian Cultural History , vol. 28 no. 2/3 2010; (p. 225-232)
Delys Bird discusses issues of essentialism and authenticity as applied to Aboriginal writing. She looks at examples of non-Aboriginal editing or framing of Aboriginal texts before moving to an extended reading of Benang and how the novel negotiates between - and complicates - ideas of orality and writing and Indigenous and non-Indigenous representation and identity.
Covered Up With Sand Kim Scott , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 66 no. 2 2007; (p. 120-124)
'Kim Scott, from an Indigenous Australian perspective, highlights the continuing role and significance of regional culture in our so-called globalised or postcolonial world.'
'Whiteness' and 'Aboriginality' in Canada and Australia Lynette Russell , Margery Fee , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Feminist Theory , August vol. 8 no. 2 2007; (p. 187-208)
'We ... begin our conversation with each other and with you by examining our personal relationship to the idea of whiteness in order to reveal some of its complexity in Canada and Australia. 'Whiteness' as an abstraction has proved useful in moving the invisible norm to visibility, but we show who an awareness of 'whiteness' in two locations can be recuperated to re-privilege the already privileged. Aboriginal speakers and writers that theorized 'whiteness', in many cases from outside the academy, in the process 'hybridizing' traditional genres. For many of them, Aboriginality, like whiteness, is a construct that often stands in the way of thinking clearly about where to go next in the fight against racism' (187).
Rhizomatic Kinship in Kim Scott's Benang Hilary Emmett , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 52 no. 2007; (p. 175-183)
Hilary Emmett argues that Kim Scott's novel, Benang : From the Heart, is an example of 'rhizomatic' writing which transforms a dominant language (English) into one that challenges the original.
Extinction, Resistance and Rebirth : The Representation of Aboriginality in 'The Timeless Land', 'The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith' and 'Benang' Isabelle Benigno , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fact and Fiction : Readings in Australian Literature 2008; (p. 111-120)
Lost and (Then) Found : The Quest For Home in 'Benang', 'Tirra Lirra By The River' and 'Requiem For a Rainbow' Reema Sarwal , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fact and Fiction : Readings in Australian Literature 2008; (p. 240-251) Australia and India : Convergences and Divergences 2010; (p. 111-123)
"I have to work right through this white way of thinking" : The Deconstruction of Discourses of Whiteness in Kim Scott's Benang Xavier Pons , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth , Autumn vol. 30 no. 1 2007; (p. 37-48)
Whiteness Under Dark Skins/Darkness Under White Skins? Kim Scott's Tryst With Aboriginal Identity in Benang Indrani(Chaudhuri) Datta , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literature : Identity, Representation and Belonging 2007; (p. 80-89)
Last amended 19 Aug 2016 12:27:09
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