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Broadside version, c.1802-1819. Bodleian Library,Harding B 25 (1576).
y Botany Bay, a New Song single work   poetry   "Let us drink a good health to our schemers above,"
First known date: ca. 1790 Issue Details: First known date: 1790 1790
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Notes

  • From a broadside in the Mitchell Library, assigned by John A. Ferguson the approximate date of 1790.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Colonial Ballads Hugh Anderson , Hugh Anderson , Ronald G. Edwards (illustrator), Ferntree Gully : Rams Skull Press , 1955 Z943064 1955 anthology poetry A selection of more than eighty Australian ballads, with music and narrative. The 2nd edition contains an index of song titles, a bibliography, an index and the following sections: (I) Street Ballads and the Bush; (II) Singers and Songs of the Goldfields; (II) "The Songs They Used to Sing"; (IV) Stringybark and Greenhide; (V) On the Far Barcoo; (VI) The Balladists; (VII) Folksong in Australia. London Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1962 pg. 7-8
    Note: With title: Botany Bay III : A New Song
  • Appears in:
    y The Overlander Songbook Ronald George Edwards (editor), Ronald George Edwards (illustrator), Ferntree Gully : Rams Skull Press , 1956 Z856165 1956 anthology poetry prose Adelaide : Rigby Publishers , 1971 pg. 13-14
    Note: With title: Botany Bay 3. Includes annotations by editor.
  • Appears in:
    y Old Bush Songs and Rhymes of Colonial Times Douglas Stewart (editor), Nancy Keesing (editor), Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1957 Z389570 1957 anthology poetry Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1976 pg. 10-12
  • Appears in:
    y Along the Western Road : Bush Stories and Ballads Percy Lindsay (illustrator), London Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1981 Z1399376 1981 anthology poetry short story London Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1981 pg. 7-8
  • Appears in:
    y The Penguin Book of Australian Ballads [1993] Elizabeth Webby (editor), Philip Butterss (editor), Ringwood : Penguin , 1993 Z136407 1993 anthology poetry humour satire Ringwood : Penguin , 1993 pg. 3-4
  • Appears in:
    y Farewell to Judges and Juries : The Broadside Ballads and Convict Transportation to Australia, 1788-1868 Hugh Anderson (editor), Hotham Hill : Red Rooster Press , 2000 Z897572 2000 anthology poetry criticism diary autobiography Verse text (and where accessible tunes) of approximately 140 transportation broadside songs and verses, with extracts from personal stories of convicts as given in letters, diaries, chapbooks, and reminiscences. More than 150 illustrations, including the art work of headpieces and reproduction of drawings and engravings. Introduction surveys books and articles dealing with the broadside industry and with convict transportation. Hotham Hill : Red Rooster Press , 2000 pg. 95-96
  • Appears in:
    y An Anthology of Australian Poetry to 1920 John Kinsella (editor), Nedlands : University of Western Australia Library , 2007 Z1908582 2007 anthology poetry column prose Nedlands : University of Western Australia Library , 2007 pg. 88-89

Works about this Work

'Where Sydney Cove Her Lucid Bosom Swells' : The Songs of an Imagined 'Nation', 1786-1789 Nathan Garvey , 2007 single work criticism essay
— Appears in: Literature Compass , March vol. 4 no. 2007;
In the years between the mooting of the Botany Bay scheme (1786), and the news of the founding of the New South Wales penal colony reaching England (1789), a number of songs were written which envisaged the Botany Bay colony as a new 'nation'. While the survival of many of these pieces in broadside ballad form have led to their being placed within the Australian 'transportation ballad' tradition, they were not folk ballads but popular songs which generally used the themes of transportation and the penal colony to make satirical or comic comment on contemporary English politics and society. This article examines the contexts and meanings of these songs, examining their reception, audiences and publishing history, in an effort to question their placement within the Australian ballad tradition, to interrogate the views expressed on nation-building and on the structure of eighteenth-century British society, and to examine the connections between Georgian elite and popular cultures.
'Where Sydney Cove Her Lucid Bosom Swells' : The Songs of an Imagined 'Nation', 1786-1789 Nathan Garvey , 2007 single work criticism essay
— Appears in: Literature Compass , March vol. 4 no. 2007;
In the years between the mooting of the Botany Bay scheme (1786), and the news of the founding of the New South Wales penal colony reaching England (1789), a number of songs were written which envisaged the Botany Bay colony as a new 'nation'. While the survival of many of these pieces in broadside ballad form have led to their being placed within the Australian 'transportation ballad' tradition, they were not folk ballads but popular songs which generally used the themes of transportation and the penal colony to make satirical or comic comment on contemporary English politics and society. This article examines the contexts and meanings of these songs, examining their reception, audiences and publishing history, in an effort to question their placement within the Australian ballad tradition, to interrogate the views expressed on nation-building and on the structure of eighteenth-century British society, and to examine the connections between Georgian elite and popular cultures.
Last amended 9 Dec 2015 05:10:12
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