6505274891651890565.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
form y Call Me Mum single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 2006 2006
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Kate is on a plane taking Warren, her 18 year old Torres Strait Islander foster son, to meet Flo, his birth mother, who is gravely ill in hospital in Brisbane. Flo hasn't seen Warren since she took him to the hospital on Thursday Island when he was a toddler and the white authorities took him away. But as Warren, Flo and Kate all prepare themselves for the reunion, unbeknown to them, Kate's Brisbane based parents, Keith and Dellmay, are planning a different kind of reunion.' (Source: IMDb website)

Production Details

  • Premiered at the 2006 Sydney Film Festival.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Family Tremors: Margot Nash’s 'Call Me Mum' Pauline Marsh , 2013 single work criticism essay
— Appears in: The Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia , vol. 4 no. 1 2013; (p. 103-116)
'Call Me Mum adds to a growing collective of films that depict indigenous women, cross-cultural relations and family dynamics in interesting and complex ways. This article uses the idea of a “genderslide” (a misquotation of genocide by one of the main characters) to explain the influence that the three strong but deeply flawed lead female characters in this film have on their son/grandson, as well as the impact of Call Me Mumon viewers. It is the conceptual spaces that constitute the idea of family that I argue are re-shaped by this conflicted depiction of intimate black/white, mother/child relations in Australia.' (Source: abstract)
Reconciliation and the History Wars in Australian Cinema Felicity Collins , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 207-222)
'When The Proposition ( a UK/Australia co-production, directed by John Hillcoat and scripted by Nick Cave) was released in 2005, film reviewers had no qualms about claiming this spectacular saga of colonial violence on the Queensland frontier as a 'history' film. A reviewer on BBC Radio 4 described The Proposition as 'a bushranger Western...set in violent 1880s Australian outback exposing the bitter racial tensions between English and Irish settlers. A Sunday Times review declared that 'Australia's brutal post-colonial history is stripped of all the lies in a bloody clash of cultures between the British police, the Irish bushrangers and the Aborigines.' Foregrounding the film's revisionist spectacle of colonial violence, an Australian reviewer predicted that, despite 'scenes of throat-cutting torture, rape and exploding heads...The Proposition could be the most accurate look at our national history yet'. (Author's introduction, 207)
Who's Your Mummy Adrian Martin , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Monthly , February no. 20 2007; (p. 52, 54)

— Review of Call Me Mum Kathleen Mary Fallon 2006 single work film/TV
Call Her Mum and Call Her A Winner! 2007 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 19 December no. 416 (p. 5)
Relative, But Also Absolute Bill Mousoulis , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , October - December no. 41 2006;
Who's Your Mummy Adrian Martin , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Monthly , February no. 20 2007; (p. 52, 54)

— Review of Call Me Mum Kathleen Mary Fallon 2006 single work film/TV
Relative, But Also Absolute Bill Mousoulis , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , October - December no. 41 2006;
Reconciliation and the History Wars in Australian Cinema Felicity Collins , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 207-222)
'When The Proposition ( a UK/Australia co-production, directed by John Hillcoat and scripted by Nick Cave) was released in 2005, film reviewers had no qualms about claiming this spectacular saga of colonial violence on the Queensland frontier as a 'history' film. A reviewer on BBC Radio 4 described The Proposition as 'a bushranger Western...set in violent 1880s Australian outback exposing the bitter racial tensions between English and Irish settlers. A Sunday Times review declared that 'Australia's brutal post-colonial history is stripped of all the lies in a bloody clash of cultures between the British police, the Irish bushrangers and the Aborigines.' Foregrounding the film's revisionist spectacle of colonial violence, an Australian reviewer predicted that, despite 'scenes of throat-cutting torture, rape and exploding heads...The Proposition could be the most accurate look at our national history yet'. (Author's introduction, 207)
Call Her Mum and Call Her A Winner! 2007 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 19 December no. 416 (p. 5)
Family Tremors: Margot Nash’s 'Call Me Mum' Pauline Marsh , 2013 single work criticism essay
— Appears in: The Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia , vol. 4 no. 1 2013; (p. 103-116)
'Call Me Mum adds to a growing collective of films that depict indigenous women, cross-cultural relations and family dynamics in interesting and complex ways. This article uses the idea of a “genderslide” (a misquotation of genocide by one of the main characters) to explain the influence that the three strong but deeply flawed lead female characters in this film have on their son/grandson, as well as the impact of Call Me Mumon viewers. It is the conceptual spaces that constitute the idea of family that I argue are re-shaped by this conflicted depiction of intimate black/white, mother/child relations in Australia.' (Source: abstract)
Last amended 14 Oct 2016 15:50:53
X