4081902533216580980.jpg
Advertisement, Camden News, 7 September 1933, p.3
form y Harmony Row single work   film/TV   humour  
Adaptation of Harmony Row George Wallace 1924 single work musical theatre
Issue Details: First known date: 1933 1933
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

After joining the police force, Tommy Wallace (aka Officer Dreadnought) is assigned to patrol Harmony Row, the roughest and most notorious district in the city. He soon makes friends with many of the locals, including Molly, a pretty street musician, and Leonard, a precocious boy soprano who accompanies her. Dreadnought runs into trouble, however, when he comes up against the notorious thug Slogger Lee. After many incidents he is forced into fighting Lee at a boxing tournament. Although almost beaten into submission, the policeman is given the strength to beat the villain by Molly, who declares her affection for him.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

'Harmony Row' Clay Djubal , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Variety Theatre Archive : Popular Culture Entertainment: 1850-1930
y Directory of World Cinema : Australia and New Zealand Ben Goldsmith (editor), Geoff Lealand (editor), Bristol : Intellect , 2010 8381183 2010 single work criticism

This addition to Intellect’s Directory of World Cinema series turns the spotlight on Australia and New Zealand, offering an in-depth and exciting look at the cinema produced in these two countries since the turn of the twentieth century. Though the two nations share considerable cultural and economic connections, their film industries remain distinct, marked by differences of scale, level of government involvement and funding, and relations with other countries and national cinemas. The volume includes essays

about prominent genres and themes, profiles of directors, and comprehensive reviews of significant titles, this user-friendly guide explores the diversity and distinctiveness of films from both countries.

Picture Theatres : Hoyts de Luxe - Successful Australian Films 1933 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 13 February 1933; (p. 11)

— Review of Diggers in Blighty Pat Hanna Ed Warrington Wilfred King Bert Reid 1933 single work film/TV ; Harmony Row George Wallace 1933 single work film/TV
The Pictures : New Australian Films - Wallace as Comic Policeman 1933 single work review
— Appears in: The Argus , 13 February 1933; (p. 3)

— Review of Harmony Row George Wallace 1933 single work film/TV ; Diggers in Blighty Pat Hanna Ed Warrington Wilfred King Bert Reid 1933 single work film/TV
New Films : 'Harmony Row' 1933 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 10 April 1933; (p. 5)

— Review of Harmony Row George Wallace 1933 single work film/TV
Picture Theatres : Hoyts de Luxe - Successful Australian Films 1933 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 13 February 1933; (p. 11)

— Review of Diggers in Blighty Pat Hanna Ed Warrington Wilfred King Bert Reid 1933 single work film/TV ; Harmony Row George Wallace 1933 single work film/TV
The Pictures : New Australian Films - Wallace as Comic Policeman 1933 single work review
— Appears in: The Argus , 13 February 1933; (p. 3)

— Review of Harmony Row George Wallace 1933 single work film/TV ; Diggers in Blighty Pat Hanna Ed Warrington Wilfred King Bert Reid 1933 single work film/TV
New Films : 'Harmony Row' 1933 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 10 April 1933; (p. 5)

— Review of Harmony Row George Wallace 1933 single work film/TV
'Harmony Row' Clay Djubal , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Variety Theatre Archive : Popular Culture Entertainment: 1850-1930
y Directory of World Cinema : Australia and New Zealand Ben Goldsmith (editor), Geoff Lealand (editor), Bristol : Intellect , 2010 8381183 2010 single work criticism

This addition to Intellect’s Directory of World Cinema series turns the spotlight on Australia and New Zealand, offering an in-depth and exciting look at the cinema produced in these two countries since the turn of the twentieth century. Though the two nations share considerable cultural and economic connections, their film industries remain distinct, marked by differences of scale, level of government involvement and funding, and relations with other countries and national cinemas. The volume includes essays

about prominent genres and themes, profiles of directors, and comprehensive reviews of significant titles, this user-friendly guide explores the diversity and distinctiveness of films from both countries.

Last amended 9 Mar 2015 08:00:37
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