Into the Blue sequence   poetry  
  • Author: David Malouf http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/malouf-david
Issue Details: First known date: 2006 2006
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

Includes

The Catch i "Ribbons of drowned sunlight under the smoky", David Malouf , 2006 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , October vol. 1 no. 2 2006; (p. 20) Typewriter Music 2007; (p. 80-81)
Rockpools i "Glass you could put a fist through", David Malouf , 2006 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , October vol. 1 no. 2 2006; (p. 20) Typewriter Music 2007; (p. 79)
Stars i "Its licking round our knees a shy demand", David Malouf , 2006 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , October vol. 1 no. 2 2006; (p. 20) Typewriter Music 2007; (p. 79)
Voyages i "Jangling in my head the blue night-music", David Malouf , 2006 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , October vol. 1 no. 2 2006; (p. 20) Typewriter Music 2007; (p. 78)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y The Australian Literary Review ALR vol. 1 no. 2 October 2006 Z1316567 2006 periodical issue 2006 pg. 20
  • Appears in:
    y Typewriter Music David Malouf , St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2007 Z1367652 2007 selected work poetry

    'David Malouf's brilliant collection of poems begins with a memory of new love - with 'grace unasked for, urgencies that boom under the pocket of a shirt' - and ends in the intimate territory of the long-familiar where there is no need for words. This volume is marked by an astonishing breadth of intelligence and erudition, yet steps lightly among the objects of our lives and the wonder of everyday replenishments. Everywhere the poems affirm the mystical delights of music, angels and fields where 'first to gather are the starlings in unquiet flocks. Then quietly, the stars'.'

    Source: Publisher's blurb.

    St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2007
    pg. 78-81
  • Appears in:
    y The Puncher & Wattmann Anthology of Australian Poetry John Leonard (editor), Glebe : Puncher and Wattmann , 2009 Z1674214 2009 anthology poetry (taught in 16 units) Glebe : Puncher and Wattmann , 2009 pg. 171-173

Works about this Work

'Our Own Way Back' : Spatial Memory in the Poetry of David Malouf Emily Bitto , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 8 2008; (p. 92-106)
Much of David Malouf's writing enacts what may be referred to as 'spatial memory'. His poetry utilises a uniquely 'layered' time-perspective in which Malouf repeatedly revisits places of personal significance over numerous collections and, through memory and imagination, imbues these spaces with mythological significance. This process can be seen as a direct response to what Malouf perceives as 'the need to remap the world so that wherever you happen to be is the centre'. Although it may at first appear as simply an autobiographical phenomenon, this process of 'spatial memory' is also revealed as significant on a broader social level, as part of Malouf's longstanding project of redefining Australia, in the eyes of its inhabitants, as a significant cultural and literary centre. When Malouf began publishing in the nineteen-sixties, his poetry, as well as his first novel Johnno, focused on the tension between the perceived 'provinciality' of Australia and the 'exoticism' of the cultural and colonial centres of England and Europe. It is arguable that Malouf's literary remapping of centre and edge is still pertinent today, though now in relation to the increasing cultural dominance of the United States. This essay examines the role of 'spatial memory' in Malouf's poetry, focusing in particular on his numerous poems devoted to the area around Moreton Bay. It demonstrates the process by which these poems of personal memoir become significant on the broader level of social memory, and draws this exploration into a discussion of Malouf's politics of space and memory. (Author's abstract)
'Our Own Way Back' : Spatial Memory in the Poetry of David Malouf Emily Bitto , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 8 2008; (p. 92-106)
Much of David Malouf's writing enacts what may be referred to as 'spatial memory'. His poetry utilises a uniquely 'layered' time-perspective in which Malouf repeatedly revisits places of personal significance over numerous collections and, through memory and imagination, imbues these spaces with mythological significance. This process can be seen as a direct response to what Malouf perceives as 'the need to remap the world so that wherever you happen to be is the centre'. Although it may at first appear as simply an autobiographical phenomenon, this process of 'spatial memory' is also revealed as significant on a broader social level, as part of Malouf's longstanding project of redefining Australia, in the eyes of its inhabitants, as a significant cultural and literary centre. When Malouf began publishing in the nineteen-sixties, his poetry, as well as his first novel Johnno, focused on the tension between the perceived 'provinciality' of Australia and the 'exoticism' of the cultural and colonial centres of England and Europe. It is arguable that Malouf's literary remapping of centre and edge is still pertinent today, though now in relation to the increasing cultural dominance of the United States. This essay examines the role of 'spatial memory' in Malouf's poetry, focusing in particular on his numerous poems devoted to the area around Moreton Bay. It demonstrates the process by which these poems of personal memoir become significant on the broader level of social memory, and draws this exploration into a discussion of Malouf's politics of space and memory. (Author's abstract)
Last amended 27 Apr 2010 11:20:34
Settings:
  • Coast,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X