7901480948860138237.jpg
Cover image courtesy the publisher.
y Auntie Rita single work   biography  
Issue Details: First known date: 1994 1994
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

"Most people call me Auntie Rita, whites as well as Aboriginal people. Auntie is a term of respect of our older women folk. You don't have to be blood-related or anything. Everyone is kin. That's a beautiful thing because in this way no one is ever truly alone, they always have someone they can turn to."

Rita Huggins told her memories to her daughter Jackie, and some of their conversation is in this book. We witness their intimacy, their similarities and their differences, the '"fighting with their tongues". Two voices, two views on a shared life.' (Source: Publisher's blurb)

Notes

  • Other formats: Also sound recording, e-book.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Canberra, Australian Capital Territory,: Aboriginal Studies Press , 1994 .
      7901480948860138237.jpg
      Cover image courtesy the publisher.
      Extent: x, 160 p.p.
      Description: illus., map, ports
      Reprinted: 1996 , 2005 , 2010
      Note/s:
      • Foreword by Lillian Holt.
      • Introduced by Jackie Huggins with interpolations in her voice throughout the text.
      • Includes glossary of aboriginal words from Wakka Wakka and Pitjara.
      ISBN: 0855752483, 9780855752484
Alternative title: Die Stimme meiner Mutter
Language: German
    • Leipzig,
      c
      Germany,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Araki Verlag , 2010 .
      Extent: 156p.
      Description: illus., maps, port., genealogical table
      ISBN: 9783941848030, 3941848038

Works about this Work

BlackWords : Our Truths - Aboriginal Writers and the Stolen Generations Anita Heiss , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 4)

In this essay Heiss demonstrates that stories, poetry, songs, plays and memoirs are 'living' evidence of truths otherwise untold or appropriated (Source: Introduction)

Connections Made and Broken : Intimacy and Estrangement in Australian Feminist Historiography Catherine Kevin , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Outskirts : Feminisms Along the Edge , May no. 28 2013;

'In this article I consider approaches taken to questions of intimacy and estrangement in feminist history in Australia since 1975. Pioneering works, namely Damned whores and God’s Police (Summers 1975); The Real Matilda (Dixson 1976); and My wife, my daughter and poor Mary Ann (Kingston 1975) demonstrated that in order to understand the nature of women’s subordination, feminism needed histories that would describe the changing contexts in which oppressive forces had shaped women’s relationships, as well as the variety of their oppressive effects. The trajectories of feminist engagements with theory in the 1970s generated particular historical questions that enabled accounts of intimacy and estrangement to feature in these early works. This ambitious body of scholarship laid a solid foundation on which Australian feminist historians have since built, offering vivid depictions of women and the contexts and dynamics of their relationships, but the story of the emergence of this rich body of work is complex and at times contested.' (Source: Author's introduction)

Talking Amongst Ourselves : 'Auntie Rita', A Private and Public Conversation of Healing Bernadette Brennan , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: a/b : Auto/Biography Studies , Summer vol. 28 no. 1 2013;

'In 1994, Jackie Huggins and her mother Rita published a ground-breaking collaborative memoir, Auntie Rita . Through Jackie’s positioning in the text as commentator, interlocutor, and daughter, Auntie Rita becomes a complex inter-generational narrative that charts not only the individual life stories of Rita and Jackie but also a larger story of Aboriginal history in twentieth-century Australia. ' (Author's abstract)

y Entangled Subjects : Indigenous/Australian Cross-Cultures Of Talk, Text, And Modernity Michèle Grossman , Netherlands : Rodopi , 2013 Z1938856 2013 single work criticism

'Indigenous Australian cultures were long known to the world mainly from the writing of anthropologists, ethnographers, historians, missionaries, and others. Indigenous Australians themselves have worked across a range of genres to challenge and reconfigure this textual legacy, so that they are now strongly represented through their own life-narratives of identity, history, politics, and culture. Even as Indigenous-authored texts have opened up new horizons of engagement with Aboriginal knowledge and representation, however, the textual politics of some of these narratives - particularly when cross-culturally produced or edited - can remain haunted by colonially grounded assumptions about orality and literacy.

Through an examination of key moments in the theorizing of orality and literacy and key texts in cross-culturally produced Indigenous life-writing, Entangled Subjects explores how some of these works can sustain, rather than trouble, the frontier zone established by modernity in relation to 'talk' and 'text'. Yet contemporary Indigenous vernaculars offer radical new approaches to how we might move beyond the orality-literacy 'frontier', and how modernity and the a-modern are productively entangled in the process. ' (Source: Angus & Robertson website www.angusrobertson.com.au)

Contemporary Life Writing : Inscribing Double Voice in Intergenerational Collaborative Life-writing Projects Martina Horakova , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: A Companion to Australian Aboriginal Literature 2013; (p. 53-69)

The author examines an narratological approach used in double-voiced narratives in which present two equally authoritative narrative voices. To exemplify aspects of the structure of 'double-voice', and its narrative complexity the author examines the life writing of Rita and Jackie Huggins biographical account Auntie Rita.

‘Bumping Some Bloody Heads Together’ : A Qualitative Study of German-Speaking Readers of Ruby Langford Ginibi’s Texts Oliver Haag , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia , vol. 3 no. 1 2012; (p. 114-125)
'The writing of Ruby Langford Ginibi has been read, not only within Australia, but also overseas. Often, Indigenous literature is regarded as a primarily national literature, addressed to first and foremost white Australian readers. This article places Ginibi's writing in an overseas context and examines the reactions that Germanspeaking readers have shown to her texts. Drawing on qualitative interviews with readers in Germany and Austria, this study explores the individual techniques of German-speaking readers to connect to the cultural foreign contexts of Ginibi's texts and make sense of them. It also reflects on the author's personal connections to Ginibi's texts and how her writing relates to his own racial contexts in Central Europe.' (Author's abstract)
Untitled Elisabeth Bähr , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Zeitschrift fur Australienstudien , no. 25 2011; (p. 157-160)

— Review of Auntie Rita Rita Cynthia Huggins Jackie Huggins 1994 single work biography
Black and White : In Search of an ‘Apt’ Response to Indigenous Writing Robin Freeman , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , October vol. 14 no. 2 2010;
'The good editor,' suggests Thomas McCormack in his Fiction Editor, the Novel and the Novelist, 'reads, and ... responds aptly' to the writer's work, 'where "aptly" means "as the ideal appropriate reader would".' McCormack develops an argument that encompasses the dual ideas of sensibility and craft as essential characteristics of the fiction editor. But at an historical juncture that has seen increasing interest in the publication of Indigenous writing, and when Indigenous writers themselves may envisage a multiplicity of readers (writing, for instance, for family and community, and to educate a wider white audience), who is the 'ideal appropriate reader' for the literary works of the current generation of Australian Indigenous writers? And what should the work of this 'good editor' be when engaging with the text of an Indigenous writer? This paper examines such questions using the work of Margaret McDonell and Jennifer Jones, among others, to explore ways in which non-Indigenous editors may apply aspects of McCormack's 'apt response' to the editing of Indigenous texts.' (Author's abstract)
Negotiating Subjectivity : Indigenous Feminist Praxis and the Politics of Aboriginality in Alexis Wright’s Plains of Promise and Melissa Lucashenko’s Steam Pigs Tomoko Ichitani , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 185-202)
Constructing Aboriginal and Dalit Women’s Subjectivity and Making “Difference” Speak : An Illustration through the Writings of Jackie Huggins, Kumud Pawde and Bama Maria Srinivasan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 70 no. 3 2010; (p. 95-115)
Examines the 'construction of 'the subject' in the life-writings of Australian Aboriginal writer Jackie Huggins and the Indian Dalit writers Bama and Kumud Pawde.' (p. 95)
Australian Biography and Autobiography Gillian Whitlock , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 165-179)
Whitlock explores the richness of Australian biography and autobiography, as it relates to the dynamics of a settler colony.
y Contesting Childhood : Autobiography, Trauma, and Memory Kate Douglas , New Brunswick : Rutgers University Press , 2010 Z1836606 2010 single work criticism 'The late 1990s and early 2000s witnessed a surge in the publication and popularity of autobiographical writings about childhood. Linking literary and cultural studies, Contesting Childhood draws on a varied selection of works from a diverse range of authors - from first-time to experienced writers. Kate Douglas explores Australian accounts of the Stolen Generation, contemporary American and British narratives of abuse, the bestselling memoirs of Andrea Ashworth, Augusten Burroughs, Robert Drewe, Mary Karr, Frank McCourt, Dave Pelzer, and Lorna Sage, among many others." "Drawing on trauma and memory studies and theories of authorship and readership, Contesting Childhood offers commentary on the triumphs, trials, and tribulations that have shaped this genre. Douglas examines the content of the narratives and the limits of their representations, as well as some of the ways in which autobiographies of youth have become politically important and influential. This study enables readers to discover how stories configure childhood within cultural memory and the public sphere.' (Publisher's blurb)
Writing Daughter : Writing Mother Deborah Jordan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mother-Texts : Narratives and Counter-Narratives 2010; (p. 110-125)
'Deborah Jordan relates some of her experiences in writing a a book, and subsequently self-publishing it, about her mother's life as a writer. Writing Mothers/Writing Daughters is a theme explored in different contexts, and in different genres. One thinks of Dursilla Modjeska's Poppy or of the biography of Edna Ryan by her equally acclaimed daughter. Jordan addresses the making of There's a Woman in the House, A 1950s Journey, which is a self publishing venture to celebrate the life and work of her own mother, through her own voice, with a collection of her own writings as a freelance journalist in the 1950s. It addresses, some of the issues that arose in the process of re-discovery and publication and some of the ideologies and options of genre. (Publisher's abstract, xviii)
A Path of Words : The Reception of Autobiographical Australian Aboriginal Writing in Italy Francesca Di Blasio , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Indigenous Biography and Autobiography 2008; (p. 29-39)
Who Is the White Subject? Reading, Writing, Whiteness Alison Ravenscroft , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , August no. 42 2007;
'From within literary studies, Alison Ravenscroft puts the notion of whiteness under pressure by asking whether the "white" subject isn't fantasmatic. Perhaps there is no white subject as such but only a subject-who-desires-whiteness, "with all the violent material effects of that desire". This subject will seek to stabilise an "I" as "white" through the reiteration of practices intelligible as white within a particular discursive context. Reading is one such moment of reiteration. Rather than the so-called white reader being "before" the text, forming meanings through reading, this subject might instead be thought of as a reading-effect. He or she is made and made again in such textual processes. In particular, Ravenscroft asks whether "settler" readers might make themselves intelligible as white by fantasising themselves as the "white" spectators of an unseeing "black" other in a scene of their own imagining' (Anne Brewster and Fiona Probyn-Rapsey, Introduction).
'She Our Gudja' : Some Reflections on Representations of Mothering, Race, Relatedness, and Aboriginal Autobiography Kay Torney Souter , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Who Cares? 2007; (p. 203-216)
Dialogic Selves: Discursive Strategies in Transcultural Collaborative Autobiographies by Rita and Jackie Huggins and Mark and Gail Mathabane Rocio G. Davis , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Biography , Spring vol. 28 no. 2 2005; (p. 276-294)
'This article addresses the project of transcultural collaborative autobiographies by Rita and Jackie Huggins and Mark and Gail Mathabane to read how the intersection of racial policies in Australia and the US, and discourses on race and racial relations, affect their personal stories. These texts make significant structural and thematic points in the context of collaborative discourse, illustrating how a particular sense of selfhood evolves and is performed in and through this multilayered dialogue.' - Author's abstract
Reciprocal Bonds : Re-Thinking Orality and Literacy in Critical Perspectives on Indigenous Australian Life-Writing Michèle Grossman , 2005 single work essay
— Appears in: Script and Print , vol. 29 no. 1-4 2005; (p. 115-129)
y Cross Talk : Collaborative Indigenous Life Writing in Australia and Canada Michael Jacklin , 2004 Z1351079 2004 single work thesis This thesis provides a comparative analysis of collaborative Indigenous life writing texts produced in Australia and Canada. Drawing on the large body of Indigenous life writing texts produced in both countries, the critical and theoretical literature surrounding these texts, and twenty-nine interviews conducted during the course of research with participants in Aboriginal and First Nations collaborative life writing, the author argues that literary criticism needs to take into account the co-operative basis of textual production as well as the constraining factors that shape the outcome of collaborative texts. Further, he argues for the importance of non-Indigenous critics acknowledging the centrality of Indigenous protocols in both the production and reception of collaborative Indigenous life writing. The thesis is based upon the premise that readers and producers of collaborative Indigenous life writing texts can and should talk to each other and that each group can benefit from such cross talk.
Recasting Indigenous Lives along the Lines of Western Desire : Editing, Autobiography, and the Colonizing Project Alison Ravenscroft , 2004 single work
— Appears in: a/b: Auto/Biography Studies , Summer/Winter vol. 19 no. 1/2 2004; (p. 189-202)
An Auntie's Perspective Talim Arab , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Dotlit : The Online Journal of Creative Writing , August vol. 4 no. 1 2003;

— Review of Auntie Rita Rita Cynthia Huggins Jackie Huggins 1994 single work biography
A Loving Labour Kate Pritchard Hughes , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Women's Book Review , March vol. 7 no. 1 1995; (p. 13-14)

— Review of Auntie Rita Rita Cynthia Huggins Jackie Huggins 1994 single work biography
Book Offers Unique Insight 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 25 Jaunary no. 93 1995; (p. 14)

— Review of Auntie Rita Rita Cynthia Huggins Jackie Huggins 1994 single work biography
'A Brisbane mother and daughter have teamed up to present a unique insight into the paternalistic policies of the 1920s in south-east Queensland.' (Source: Koori Mail Ed.93 1995)
Untitled Elisabeth Bähr , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Zeitschrift fur Australienstudien , no. 25 2011; (p. 157-160)

— Review of Auntie Rita Rita Cynthia Huggins Jackie Huggins 1994 single work biography
Rethinking Emplacement, Displacement and Indigeneity : Radiance, Auntie Rita and Don't Take Your Love to Town Ceridwen Spark , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 75 2002; (p. 95-103, notes 191-192)
y Cross Talk : Collaborative Indigenous Life Writing in Australia and Canada Michael Jacklin , 2004 Z1351079 2004 single work thesis This thesis provides a comparative analysis of collaborative Indigenous life writing texts produced in Australia and Canada. Drawing on the large body of Indigenous life writing texts produced in both countries, the critical and theoretical literature surrounding these texts, and twenty-nine interviews conducted during the course of research with participants in Aboriginal and First Nations collaborative life writing, the author argues that literary criticism needs to take into account the co-operative basis of textual production as well as the constraining factors that shape the outcome of collaborative texts. Further, he argues for the importance of non-Indigenous critics acknowledging the centrality of Indigenous protocols in both the production and reception of collaborative Indigenous life writing. The thesis is based upon the premise that readers and producers of collaborative Indigenous life writing texts can and should talk to each other and that each group can benefit from such cross talk.
Dialogic Selves: Discursive Strategies in Transcultural Collaborative Autobiographies by Rita and Jackie Huggins and Mark and Gail Mathabane Rocio G. Davis , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Biography , Spring vol. 28 no. 2 2005; (p. 276-294)
'This article addresses the project of transcultural collaborative autobiographies by Rita and Jackie Huggins and Mark and Gail Mathabane to read how the intersection of racial policies in Australia and the US, and discourses on race and racial relations, affect their personal stories. These texts make significant structural and thematic points in the context of collaborative discourse, illustrating how a particular sense of selfhood evolves and is performed in and through this multilayered dialogue.' - Author's abstract
Troubled Canadian Gazing : Aboriginal Women's Lifestorytelling, Multicultural Nationalism, and the Australian-Canadian Comparative Model Jennifer Kelly , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Balayi , vol. 2 no. 1 2001; (p. 137-167)
In this article, Jennifer Kelly is 'concerned in particular with how the Australian-Canadian comparative model constrains the analysis of the diverse nationalist aspirations of the multiple Aboriginal nations whose territories are overlain by Canada and Australia' (138). In her analysis, Kelly draws on numerous Aboriginal women's life writing texts from both Australia and Canada.
Reciprocal Bonds : Re-Thinking Orality and Literacy in Critical Perspectives on Indigenous Australian Life-Writing Michèle Grossman , 2005 single work essay
— Appears in: Script and Print , vol. 29 no. 1-4 2005; (p. 115-129)
Reconciling Our Mothers' Lives Jackie Huggins , Isabel Tarrago , Kay Saunders , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: Race, Colour and Identity in Australia and New Zealand 2000; (p. 39-58)
Clean White Girls : Assimilation and Women's Work Francesca Bartlett , 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 25 no. 1 1999; (p. 10-38) Unmasking Whiteness : Race Relations and Reconciliation 1999; (p. 52-67)
In her essay, Bartlett analyses 'the narrative of cleanliness,' its role in assimilationist discourse and dissemination through magazines, newspapers and documentaries, and its application and impact upon Indigenous girls lives as represented in a number of Indigenous life-writing texts.
Who Is the White Subject? Reading, Writing, Whiteness Alison Ravenscroft , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , August no. 42 2007;
'From within literary studies, Alison Ravenscroft puts the notion of whiteness under pressure by asking whether the "white" subject isn't fantasmatic. Perhaps there is no white subject as such but only a subject-who-desires-whiteness, "with all the violent material effects of that desire". This subject will seek to stabilise an "I" as "white" through the reiteration of practices intelligible as white within a particular discursive context. Reading is one such moment of reiteration. Rather than the so-called white reader being "before" the text, forming meanings through reading, this subject might instead be thought of as a reading-effect. He or she is made and made again in such textual processes. In particular, Ravenscroft asks whether "settler" readers might make themselves intelligible as white by fantasising themselves as the "white" spectators of an unseeing "black" other in a scene of their own imagining' (Anne Brewster and Fiona Probyn-Rapsey, Introduction).
'She Our Gudja' : Some Reflections on Representations of Mothering, Race, Relatedness, and Aboriginal Autobiography Kay Torney Souter , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Who Cares? 2007; (p. 203-216)
A Path of Words : The Reception of Autobiographical Australian Aboriginal Writing in Italy Francesca Di Blasio , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Indigenous Biography and Autobiography 2008; (p. 29-39)
Black and White : In Search of an ‘Apt’ Response to Indigenous Writing Robin Freeman , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , October vol. 14 no. 2 2010;
'The good editor,' suggests Thomas McCormack in his Fiction Editor, the Novel and the Novelist, 'reads, and ... responds aptly' to the writer's work, 'where "aptly" means "as the ideal appropriate reader would".' McCormack develops an argument that encompasses the dual ideas of sensibility and craft as essential characteristics of the fiction editor. But at an historical juncture that has seen increasing interest in the publication of Indigenous writing, and when Indigenous writers themselves may envisage a multiplicity of readers (writing, for instance, for family and community, and to educate a wider white audience), who is the 'ideal appropriate reader' for the literary works of the current generation of Australian Indigenous writers? And what should the work of this 'good editor' be when engaging with the text of an Indigenous writer? This paper examines such questions using the work of Margaret McDonell and Jennifer Jones, among others, to explore ways in which non-Indigenous editors may apply aspects of McCormack's 'apt response' to the editing of Indigenous texts.' (Author's abstract)
Negotiating Subjectivity : Indigenous Feminist Praxis and the Politics of Aboriginality in Alexis Wright’s Plains of Promise and Melissa Lucashenko’s Steam Pigs Tomoko Ichitani , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 185-202)
Constructing Aboriginal and Dalit Women’s Subjectivity and Making “Difference” Speak : An Illustration through the Writings of Jackie Huggins, Kumud Pawde and Bama Maria Srinivasan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 70 no. 3 2010; (p. 95-115)
Examines the 'construction of 'the subject' in the life-writings of Australian Aboriginal writer Jackie Huggins and the Indian Dalit writers Bama and Kumud Pawde.' (p. 95)
Australian Biography and Autobiography Gillian Whitlock , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 165-179)
Whitlock explores the richness of Australian biography and autobiography, as it relates to the dynamics of a settler colony.
y Contesting Childhood : Autobiography, Trauma, and Memory Kate Douglas , New Brunswick : Rutgers University Press , 2010 Z1836606 2010 single work criticism 'The late 1990s and early 2000s witnessed a surge in the publication and popularity of autobiographical writings about childhood. Linking literary and cultural studies, Contesting Childhood draws on a varied selection of works from a diverse range of authors - from first-time to experienced writers. Kate Douglas explores Australian accounts of the Stolen Generation, contemporary American and British narratives of abuse, the bestselling memoirs of Andrea Ashworth, Augusten Burroughs, Robert Drewe, Mary Karr, Frank McCourt, Dave Pelzer, and Lorna Sage, among many others." "Drawing on trauma and memory studies and theories of authorship and readership, Contesting Childhood offers commentary on the triumphs, trials, and tribulations that have shaped this genre. Douglas examines the content of the narratives and the limits of their representations, as well as some of the ways in which autobiographies of youth have become politically important and influential. This study enables readers to discover how stories configure childhood within cultural memory and the public sphere.' (Publisher's blurb)
Writing Daughter : Writing Mother Deborah Jordan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mother-Texts : Narratives and Counter-Narratives 2010; (p. 110-125)
'Deborah Jordan relates some of her experiences in writing a a book, and subsequently self-publishing it, about her mother's life as a writer. Writing Mothers/Writing Daughters is a theme explored in different contexts, and in different genres. One thinks of Dursilla Modjeska's Poppy or of the biography of Edna Ryan by her equally acclaimed daughter. Jordan addresses the making of There's a Woman in the House, A 1950s Journey, which is a self publishing venture to celebrate the life and work of her own mother, through her own voice, with a collection of her own writings as a freelance journalist in the 1950s. It addresses, some of the issues that arose in the process of re-discovery and publication and some of the ideologies and options of genre. (Publisher's abstract, xviii)
‘Bumping Some Bloody Heads Together’ : A Qualitative Study of German-Speaking Readers of Ruby Langford Ginibi’s Texts Oliver Haag , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia , vol. 3 no. 1 2012; (p. 114-125)
'The writing of Ruby Langford Ginibi has been read, not only within Australia, but also overseas. Often, Indigenous literature is regarded as a primarily national literature, addressed to first and foremost white Australian readers. This article places Ginibi's writing in an overseas context and examines the reactions that Germanspeaking readers have shown to her texts. Drawing on qualitative interviews with readers in Germany and Austria, this study explores the individual techniques of German-speaking readers to connect to the cultural foreign contexts of Ginibi's texts and make sense of them. It also reflects on the author's personal connections to Ginibi's texts and how her writing relates to his own racial contexts in Central Europe.' (Author's abstract)
y Sister Girl : The Writings of Aboriginal Activist and Historian Jackie Huggins Jackie Huggins , St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1998 Z215395 1998 selected work prose interview essay biography (taught in 4 units) The articles in this collection 'represent a decade of writing by Aboriginal historian and activist Jackie Huggins. These essays and interviews combine both the public and the personal in a bold trajectory tracing one Murri woman's journey towards self-discovery and human understanding...Sister Girl examines many topics, including community action, political commitment, the tradition and value of oral history, and government intervention in Aboriginal lives. It challenges accepted notions of the appropriateness of mainstream feminism in Aboriginal society and of white historians writing Indigenous history. Closer to home, there are accounts of personal achievement and family experience as she revisits the writing of Auntie Rita with her mother Rita Huggins - the inspiration for her lifework.' (Source: Back cover, 1998 UQP edition)
Presenting Aboriginal Women's Life Narratives Amanda Nettelbeck , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Literatures Review , Winter no. 34 1997; (p. 43-56)
Strange and Sanguine Relations : Aboriginal Writing and Western Book Culture Alison Ravenscroft , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meridian , October vol. 16 no. 2 1997; (p. 261-269)
Last amended 22 Jan 2014 11:11:09
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