y An Ogre Up-To-Date selected work   children's fiction   poetry   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 1911 1911
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

A collection of short stories and poems including works of adventure, humour and fantasy.

Contents

* Contents derived from the London,
c
England,
c
c
United Kingdom (UK),
c
Western Europe, Europe,
:
Melbourne, Victoria,: Ward, Lock , 1911 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
An Ogre Up-to-Date, Ethel Turner , 1911 single work children's fiction children's (p. 17-47)
Gum Leavesi"I asked the red gum tree:", Ethel Turner , 1900 single work poetry (p. 49)
The Butcher and the Buccaneeri"Now strike the wild piano, and please give attentive ear", The Old Sailor , The Little Laureate , 1897 single work poetry humour (p. 53)
Note: Written as: (By Captain Cook)
The Convalescence of Taffie Farndon, Ethel Turner , 1900 single work children's fiction humour children's (p. 67-88)
Johnnie and I are Outi"We've shut the door of the playhouse, there sounds no call or shout,", Ethel Turner , 1899 single work poetry (p. 91)
Note: Written as: (By the Little Laureate)
Two Doorsi"There was a young boy at North Shore", Ethel Turner , 1911 single work poetry (p. 100)
Told in the Wattle Scrub, E. S. T. , 1893 single work children's fiction children's (p. 108-129)
A Trembling Stari"'There is my little trembling star,' she said.", Ethel Turner , 1899 single work poetry (p. 133-137)
Note: Written as: (By the Little Laureate)
Content of the Kangaroo, E. T. , 1894 single work children's fiction children's (p. 141-147)
Somebody's Darlingi"A broken nose and a battered face", Ethel Turner , 1911 single work poetry (p. 148)
Court of Entertainers, Ethel Turner , 1911 single work children's fiction children's humour (p. 150-222)
Walking to Schooli"Now I am five, my father says", Ethel Turner , 1911 single work poetry children's (p. 223-224)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Melbourne, Victoria,: Ward, Lock , 1911 .
      Extent: 224, [7]p. of platesp.
      Description: illus., (some col.)
      Note/s:
      • Publishers' Note: '...This volume contains all that delightful humour and exquisite pathos characteristic of her first and great success, Seven Little Australians. ...'
      • Acknowledgment: Some of the matter contained in this volume also appeared in the Town and Country Journal, and it is through the courtesy of the Proprietors of that paper that it is included here.

Works about this Work

She Rides Astride : Mateship, Morality and the Outback-Colonial Girl Caroline Campbell , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Victorian Studies , vol. 18 no. 1 2013; (p. 28-39)

'This article focuses on the representation of girlhood, gender and mateship particular to Australia, and to a lesser extent New Zealand, within the context of an emerging nationalism, social change and political upheaval. In it, I apply an illustrator’s perspective to interrogating the cultural significance of Mary Grant Bruce’s iconic outback heroine, Norah of Billabong Station. By comparatively examining Norah’s sequential representation in the narrative text, and the illustrations produced by John MacFarlane, I argue Bruce and her little-known, and rarely discussed immigrant illustrator combined to create an ideal and national type that was counter to anything that had been created for colonial girl readers before.' (Author's abstract)

She Rides Astride : Mateship, Morality and the Outback-Colonial Girl Caroline Campbell , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Victorian Studies , vol. 18 no. 1 2013; (p. 28-39)

'This article focuses on the representation of girlhood, gender and mateship particular to Australia, and to a lesser extent New Zealand, within the context of an emerging nationalism, social change and political upheaval. In it, I apply an illustrator’s perspective to interrogating the cultural significance of Mary Grant Bruce’s iconic outback heroine, Norah of Billabong Station. By comparatively examining Norah’s sequential representation in the narrative text, and the illustrations produced by John MacFarlane, I argue Bruce and her little-known, and rarely discussed immigrant illustrator combined to create an ideal and national type that was counter to anything that had been created for colonial girl readers before.' (Author's abstract)

Last amended 21 Jan 2008 12:37:08
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