9114050960160418628.jpg
Cover image courtesy of Penguin Books.
923081919387410438.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y Landscape with Animals single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2006... 2006 Landscape with Animals
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Landscape with Animals charts a love affair that comes once in a lifetime, and changes lives forever. She is free and untamed; he is neither. With a simple glance, his image is cut into her. Between them develops an attraction that is irresistible, boundless, jubilant and destructive. This exquisite erotic novel explores what it is to love the things you cannot keep.' (Penguin Australia website)

Notes

  • Epigraph: Love that moves the sun and the other stars. Dante

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2006 .
      9114050960160418628.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of Penguin Books.
      Extent: 212p.
      ISBN: 0143005065, 9780143005063
    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2007 .
      923081919387410438.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 212p.
      ISBN: 9780143006084 (pbk.)
Alternative title: Atracção
Language: Portuguese

Works about this Work

The Silver Age of Fiction Peter Pierce , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 70 no. 4 2011; (p. 110-115)

‘In human reckoning, Golden Ages are always already in the past. The Greek poet Hesiod, in Works and Days, posited Five Ages of Mankind: Golden, Silver, Bronze, Heroic and Iron (Ovid made do with four). Writing in the Romantic period, Thomas Love Peacock (author of such now almost forgotten novels as Nightmare Abbey, 1818) defined The Four Ages of Poetry (1820) in which their order was Iron, Gold, Silver and Bronze. To the Golden Age, in their archaic greatness, belonged Homer and Aeschylus. The Silver Age, following it, was less original, but nevertheless 'the age of civilised life'. The main issue of Peacock's thesis was the famous response that he elicited from his friend Shelley - Defence of Poetry (1821).’ (Publication abstract)

Strangled by Success Rosemary Neill , 2007 single work biography
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 30 June - 1 July 2007; (p. 6)
I'll Tell You All - Except My Name Kate Holden , 2006 single work essay
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 18-19 November 2006; (p. 28-29)

Kate Holden explores her curiosity at the use of pseudonyms by women writers of erotic literature. She concludes 'Playfulness, coyness, mystique and titillation are part of the erotic. In the age of bold women and admirable authors, though, it seems a shame to be so shy. It may be that "Anonymous" has the allure of teasing seduction, but a tease can go on only so long before it starts to look like apprehension.'

Erotic Turn Misses the Plot Ben Harrison , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 10 - 11 June 2006; (p. 22)

— Review of Landscape with Animals Cameron S. Redfern 2006 single work novel
Sex and the Singular Woman Marion Halligan , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 24-25 June 2006; (p. 8-9)
Halligan wonders whether 'some men have trouble reading women writing about sex'. She illustrates her theme via the critical response to Cameron Redfern's (i.e. Sonya Hartnett's) Landscape with Animals.
Animal Attraction Peter Craven , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 20 May 2006; (p. 24)

— Review of Landscape with Animals Cameron S. Redfern 2006 single work novel
Vaseline Smears Vision in an Overblown Sex Shocker Peter Craven , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20-21 May 2006; (p. 32-33)

— Review of Landscape with Animals Cameron S. Redfern 2006 single work novel
On the Hunt for Love Helen Elliott , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 27-28 May 2006; (p. 14-15)

— Review of Landscape with Animals Cameron S. Redfern 2006 single work novel
He's a She Who's Master of the Art of Erotica Marion Halligan , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 3 June 2006; (p. 13)

— Review of Landscape with Animals Cameron S. Redfern 2006 single work novel
Erotic Turn Misses the Plot Ben Harrison , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 10 - 11 June 2006; (p. 22)

— Review of Landscape with Animals Cameron S. Redfern 2006 single work novel
Sex-Lit Swap for Author Kenneth Nguyen , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 14 May 2006; (p. 3)
From Child's Play to Adults Only Catherine Keenan , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 13-14 May 2006; (p. 3) The West Australian , 26 August 2006; (p. 7)
Catherine Keenan reports that Sonya Hartnett 'did not want her name on Landscape to keep it distinct from her other works and to prevent children's libraries shelving it in the children's sections...' Hence the use of a pseudonym.
Faking It Sonya Hartnett , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 28 May 2006; (p. 18)
Sex and the Singular Woman Marion Halligan , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 24-25 June 2006; (p. 8-9)
Halligan wonders whether 'some men have trouble reading women writing about sex'. She illustrates her theme via the critical response to Cameron Redfern's (i.e. Sonya Hartnett's) Landscape with Animals.
I'll Tell You All - Except My Name Kate Holden , 2006 single work essay
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 18-19 November 2006; (p. 28-29)

Kate Holden explores her curiosity at the use of pseudonyms by women writers of erotic literature. She concludes 'Playfulness, coyness, mystique and titillation are part of the erotic. In the age of bold women and admirable authors, though, it seems a shame to be so shy. It may be that "Anonymous" has the allure of teasing seduction, but a tease can go on only so long before it starts to look like apprehension.'

Last amended 6 Oct 2015 09:52:37
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