Is part of The Academy Editions of Australian Literature 1992- series - publisher
Note: Music edited by Angela Turner.
Issue Details: First known date: 2006 2006
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Contents

* Contents derived from the St Lucia, Indooroopilly - St Lucia area, Brisbane - North West, Brisbane, Queensland,: University of Queensland Press , 2006 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Bushrangers; or, Norwood Vale, Henry Melville , 1834-2006 single work drama (p. 3-39)
Note: Introduction appears on pp.5-12.
Life in Sydney; Or, The Ran Dan Club, A. B. C. (fl. 1843) , 1843 single work musical theatre burlesque humour

Perhaps best described as a 'burletta', this two-act theatrical adaptation of Pierce Egan's picaresque novel of 'fast' city living, Tom and Jerry: Life in London; or, The Day and Night Scenes of Jerry Hawthorn, Esq. and his Elegant Friend Corinthian Tom in their Rambles and Sprees through the Metropolis (1820-1821) was one of many staged in England and Australia during the 1800s.

The plot in this version begins with the arrival of Jerry Webber in the colony. Upon being made a member of the Ran Dan Club, he is taken under the wing of Tom King and Bob Logic. The three make their way from Macquarie Place (where Tom wins a £50 bet) to the Shakespeare Tavern. They join a fight between the 'Cabbage Tree Mob' and the police, go to a ball, visit an auction mart, and later find themselves at The Rocks, where one can 'see life as low as ever you did in St Giles in London' (qtd Leslie Rees, The Making of Australian Drama, p.61). Three young women who are keen on the Ran Danners disguise themselves as sailors in order to follow them, which leads to a sing-a-long. The police cut this short, another fight ensues, and the men escape. They talk next of going to the theatre, at which point Logic says to Jerry, 'my dear fellow, the Victoria is really a tolerable good theatre, superior to many in London... some of our native talent, and of those who never saw a theatre but a Sydney one, may vie with those who have been born as 'twere upon the stage' (qtd Rees, p.61). The final scene, set in a court house at Woolloomooloo, sees the three women 'bagging' their men. It ends with a jolly chorus.

(p. 39-93)
Note: Introduction appears on pp.41-58
Arabin; or, The Adventures of a Settler, James R. McLaughlin , 1847 single work drama (p. 96-190)
Note: Introduction appears on pp.96-119
The South Sea Sisters : A Lyric Masque, R. H. Horne , Charles E. Horsley (composer), 1866 single work musical theatre

Lyric Masque.

Written in verse form, The South-Sea Sisters was commissioned for the opening of the Intercolonial Exhibition of Australasia, Melbourne in 1866. Richard Fotheringham (q.v.), in his introduction to the masque in Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage : 1834-1899 (q.v.) asserts, however, that 'it was almost certainly' Charles Horsley who commissioned it. Although involving no acting, dancing or stage settings as such, and thus barely qualifying as drama, the spectacle presented does resonate with notions of theatre and theatricality. In this respect an estimated 300 singers and instrumentalists participated in the performance.The unaccompanied sections were read by the principal singers.

The Argus wrote of Horsley's contribution to the event : 'The South Sea Sisters is a lyric masque of unquestionable merit... [the symphony of which] intended to convey the idea of the primeval wilderness [in] Hayden's Chorus, but without the appropriation of a single phrase. The somber character of the music was sustained by striking and original passages in the first chorus "Deep in the Stony Silence of the Earth, The Wealth of Nations Lies." Following the recitative, "The Deep Hoarse Mirth Quells", sung by Mr Angus, comes the second part, beginning with "The Rolling Ships and the Rolling Sea". The second part also contains "The March of all Nations", in which Horsley manages to introduce and combine with surprising ingenuity several popular airs. Another chorus, "The Corroboree Chorus," is described in the Argus as being 'intended to musically imitate the native corroboree, and shows wonderful versatility... the words were so rendered by the chorus as to electrify the audience, and bring down thunders of applause" (27 October 1866, Supp p7). The Age reports, too, that it was encored three times (25 October 1866, p7). In her biography of R. H. Horne (q.v.), Ann Blainey (q.v.) also writes that the masque 'delighted audiences... it's aboriginal choruses, rhythmically designed to suggest a corroboree, brought the audience to its feet, a triumph that no bewailing of critics next day could destroy' (p234).

The 'South Sea Sisters' in the title refers to the seven Australasian colonies (including New Zealand). In his libretto, Horne calls for 'a young and vigorous new nation to replace the 'ponderous paws' and 'gorged body and brain' of the grey old lion of Britain' (ctd. in Fotheringham p195).

(p. 191-215)
Note:
  • Libretto only.
  • Introduction appears on pp.193-198.
  • The copy text for this version is the 1886 H. T. Dwight edition. The French and German translations are omitted.
The House that Jack Built ; Or, Harlequin Jack Sydney, Little Australia and the Gnome of the Golden Mine, and the Australian Fernery in the Golden Conservatory, the Home of Diamantina, W. M. Akhurst , Walter Rice (composer), Anonymous , 1871 single work musical theatre pantomime fantasy

A localised and updated adaptation of W. M. Akhurst's 1869 pantomime The House that Jack Built, or, Harlequin Progress and the Loves, Laughs, Laments and Labors of Jack Melbourne and Little Victoria (Theatre Royal, Melbourne), with incidental music (including the overture) by Walter Rice.

The pantomime contains numerous hits at local identities, issues, and events. Of this aspect of the production, Richard Fotheringham writes:

'Since before 1820 the 'House that Jack Built' story had been used for political commentary. Akhurst follows this tradition in making his hero Jack Melbourne and Little Victoria represent the hopes and fears for the future of that colony and his villain Orognome some of its current vices, particularly unscrupulous and fraudulent manipulation of mining stocks and share trading 'Under the Verandah'. The Sydney localiser found no reason to alter this element, apart from substituting a few more recent financial scandals or ones closer to home' (Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage, pp.220-21).

There does appear, however, to be a less explicit celebration of local achievements in this production.

The story concerns Jack Sydney, who has been raised and educated by the Fairy Queen Diamantina in an attempt to foil the evil plans of Orognome (the Gold Sovereign). Some years previously, Orognome kidnapped Little Australia,to prevent her from bringing to fruition a prophecy made at her birth, which foretells that she would 'rule half the earth'. Diamantina's plan is that Jack will improve the land upon which 'his lot has been cast', thereby countering Orognome's intentions. However, being both mortal and a young man just on eighteen, Jack begins exhibiting desires to move beyond the fairy cave he has lived in almost all his life. He digs a hole that eventually leads him to Orognome's home, where he meets and falls in love with Little Australia. The Gold Sovereign drugs Jack and leaves 'him in a critical position on the line over which the gold trucks pass'. He is saved from being crushed (in a burlesque of Dion Boucicault's After Dark) by Joey, 'a marsupial attendant upon Little Australia and who possesses 'largely cultivated instincts.' With the aid of Diamantina, Jack and Little Australia make their way to the surface, where Jack is required to build a house and make history in order to defeat Orognome. Although he succeeds in erecting his house (it turns out to be the House of Parliament) and presenting a panorama of Sydney's history from 1835 to the present day, Jack does not prosper from his handiwork. He is later found outside the house, where Orognome, disguised as a stockbroker (an 'under the Verandah Man'), swindles him through bogus land and mining speculation. Jack is once again saved by Diamantina, however, before being conveyed, along with Little Australia and Joey, to the 'Golden Conservatory and Temple of Gems', where the transformation scene takes place.

(Plot synopsis cited in Age 28 December 1869, p.3; Australasian 1 January 1870, p.18; and Sydney Mail 30 December 1871, p.1395).

The scenes presented were:

Act 1.

Scene 1. The Haunted Dell of Diamonds with Fairy Castle in the Air.

Scene 2. The Superficial Deposits and Stratified Rocks Leading to the Great Suburb of Horrifferousquartzton.

Scene 3. Palatial Caverns of Orognome.

Scene 4. The Dell of Diamonds (Revisited).

Scene 5. The House that Jack Built.

Scene 6. Exterior of the New Post Office.

Grand Transformation Scene and Harlequinade:

Act 2.

Scene 1. Post Office, Sydney.

Scene 2. Turner's Market Cloth Hall, 484 George Street, and Lemaire's Toy Shop.

Scene 3. A Well Known Spot in Hyde Park, Sydney.

Scene 4. G. H. Smith, Hatter, George Street.

Scene 5. The Loviathon Plum Pudding.

Scene 6. Silver Trelliced Dell in the Australian Fernery.

Songs incorporated into this production included the opening from the opera Pipele (by Serafino De Ferrari), 'Dada' (solo and chorus), 'Popsy Wopsy' (duet), 'Wind Up Galop' (duet and chorus), 'The Style to Which It's Done' (topical song), 'Rollicking Rams' (chorus), 'Chickaleary Bloke', 'Ring the Bell, Watchman', 'See at Your Feet' (trio), 'Fair Land of Poland' (solo), 'Through the World' (trio), 'Meet me in the Lane', 'Cruel Jane Jemima', 'J'aime les Militairs', 'Cork Leg', 'Mary Holder', 'Burlington Arcade' (duet), and 'Hot Coddlins'.

(p. 217-314)
Note:
  • See 'Introduction', pp.218-232.
  • Both the Melbourne and Sydney texts are presented as enfolded text. (See 'Note on the Text', pp.234-235 for conventions of presentation.)
  • Includes facsimile reproductions of the cover-wrapper for the 1869 Melbourne libretto and the cast list for the 1871 Sydney libretto.
  • Music and lyrics for songs presented in the Sydney and Melbourne productions are included at the end of the publication, see pp.668-705.
The House that Jack Built ; Or, Harlequin Progress and the Loves, Laughs, Laments and Labors of Jack Melbourne, and Little Victoria : A Fairy Extravaganza Opening to Pantomime, W. M. Akhurst , 1869 single work musical theatre pantomime fantasy

A pantomime with many topical references to well-known personalities, recent events, and Victorian politics (notably allegations of land fraud involving several members of parliament), towards which the author directs much light-hearted satire. Of these topical reference, theatre historian Richard Fotheringham writes:

'Since before 1820 the "House that Jack Built" story had been used for political commentary. Akhurst follows this tradition in making his hero Jack Melbourne and Little Victoria represent the hopes and fears for the future of that colony and his villain Orognome some of its current vices, particularly unscrupulous and fraudulent manipulation of mining stocks and share trading 'Under the Verandah' (Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage, pp.220-21).

The story concerns Jack Melbourne, who has been raised and educated by the Fairy Queen Diamantina in an attempt to foil the evil plans of Orognome (the Gold Sovereign). Some years previously, Orognome kidnapped Little Victoria in order to prevent her from bringing to fruition a prophecy made at her birth, which foretells that she would 'rule half the earth'. Diamantina's plan is that Jack will improve the land upon which 'his lot has been cast', thereby countering Orognome's intentions. However, being both mortal and a young man just on eighteen, Jack begins exhibiting desires to move beyond the fairy cave he has lived in almost all his life. He digs a hole that eventually leads him to Orognome's home, where he meets and falls in love with Little Victoria. The Gold Sovereign drugs Jack and leaves 'him in a critical position on the line over which the gold trucks pass'. He is saved from being crushed (in a burlesque of Dion Boucicault's After Dark) by Joey, 'a marsupial attendant upon Little Victoria and who possesses largely cultivated instincts.' With the aid of Diamantina, Jack and Little Victoria make their way to the surface, where Jack is required to build a house and make history in order to defeat Orognome. Although he succeeds in erecting his house (which turns out to be the House of Parliament) and presenting a panorama of Melbourne's history from 1835 to the present day, Jack does not prosper from his handiwork. He is later found outside the house, where Orognome, disguised as a stockbroker (an 'under the Verandah Man'), swindles him through bogus land and mining speculation. Jack is once again saved by Diamantina, however, before being conveyed, along with Little Victoria and Joey, to the 'Golden Conservatory and Temple of Gems', where the transformation scene takes place.

The scenes presented were:

Scene 1. The Haunted Dell of Diamonds with Fairy Castle in the Air.

Scene 2. The Superficial Deposits and Stratified Rocks Leading to the Great Suburb of Horrifferousquartzton.

Scene 3. Palatial Caverns of Orognome.

Scene 4. The Dell of Diamonds (Revisited) and The House that Jack Built.

Scene 5. An Aboriginal Wood in Australia Felix with Salt Lagoon / Panorama: The 'Enterprise' Schooner Landing the First Melbourne Settlers; Collins Street, 1838 ; A Sheep Station, 1848; Departure of Burke and Wills; and Melbourne, 1869.

Scene 6. Exterior of the Houses of Parliament.

The musical element, selected and arranged by Frederick Coppin, contains both operatic and popular styles. The Age theatre critic notes, however, that while many of the songs contained melodies that had become popular in England, most were still unknown to Melbourne audiences (27 December 1869, p.3). Songs incorporated into this production included 'Where is my Nancy', 'Dada' (solo and chorus), 'Popsy Wopsy' (duet), 'Wind Up Galop' (duet and chorus), 'God save the Queen', 'The Style to Which It's Done' (topical song), 'Rollicking Rams' (chorus), 'Chickaleary Bloke', 'Ring the Bell, Watchman', 'See at Your Feet' (trio), 'Fair Land of Poland' (solo), 'Through the World' (trio), 'Meet me in the Lane', 'Cruel Jane Jemima', 'J'aime les Militairs', 'Cork Leg', 'Mary Holder', 'Burlington Arcade' (duet), and 'Hot Coddlins'.

[Plot synopsis cited in the Age 28 December 1869, p.3; Australasian 1 January 1870, p.18; and Sydney Mail 30 December 1871, p.1395]

(p. 217-314)
Note:
  • Introduction appears on pp.218-232.
  • Both the Melbourne and Sydney texts are presented as enfolded text. (See 'Note on the Text', pp.234-235 for conventions of presentation.)
  • Includes facsimile reproductions of the cover-wrapper for the 1869 Melbourne libretto and the cast list for the 1871 Sydney libretto.
  • Music and lyrics for songs included in the productions are published on pp.668-705.
Hazard; or, Pearce Dyceton's Crime : A Sensational Comic Drama in Three Acts, Walter H. Cooper , 1872 single work drama (p. 315-384)
Note: Introduction appears on pp.316-324,
For £60,000!!! : A Sensational Comedy in Four Acts, Helen Benbow , 1874 single work drama humour For £60,000 (p. 385-453)
Note: Introduction appears on pp. 387-396.
For the Term of His Natural Life, Thomas Walker , 1886 single work drama (p. 455-548)
Note: Introduction appears on pp.457-470
The Kelly Gang, Arnold Denham , 1899 single work drama (p. 549-654)
Note: Introduction appears on pp.551-570. The introduction traces the development of various plays based on the exploits of the Kelly Gang and includes a diagram showing the lines of transmission between various versions of the play, and its associated texts, in Australia and New Zealand.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • St Lucia, Indooroopilly - St Lucia area, Brisbane - North West, Brisbane, Queensland,: University of Queensland Press , 2006 .
      Extent: lxxxvi, 732, [2]p.p.
      Description: illus., music
      Note/s:
      • Includes chronology, list of abbreviations, general introduction and editorial commentary on the music.

      • Each play is preceded by a critical introduction relating specifically to the play, its author and provenance.
      ISBN: 0702234877 (hbk.), 0702234885 (pbk.)

Works about this Work

Transnational Connectivities of Whiteness : American Blackface in Life in Sydney Ben Miller , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 151-166)
'This chapter considers a form of entertainment popular during the nineteenth century in America and Australia - blackface entertainment - to investigate some connections between the two nations. This chapter suggests that blackface entertainment was one of an array of technologies that encoded transnational views about nation, class and race. During the 1830s and 1840s, in both America and Australia, discourses of otherness energised and united a transnational community of white workers who challenged the social and cultural authority of the upper classes at the same time as asserting their authority over racial minorities.' (p. 151)
Untitled Robert Dixon , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Archiv fur das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen , no. 1 2008; (p. 196-198)

— Review of Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage : 1834-1899 2006 anthology drama ; The Collected Verse of Mary Gilmore Mary Gilmore 2004-2007 collected work poetry
The two books under review are, respectively, the seventh and eighth volumes to appear in the estimable Academy Editions of Australian Literature series. Initiated in 1992 under the general editorship of Professor Paul Eggert, the series is the first to provide modern scholarly editions of the key works of Australian literature, including reliable reading texts and contextual annotation based on rigorous scholarship and thorough textual collation. Previous volumes of especial interest to European readers include Marcus Clarke's His Natural Life (1874); Catherine Martin's An Australian Girl (1890), which draws extensively on the context of nineteenth-century European thought; and Henry Handel Richardson's Maurice Guest (1908), which is set in the musical world of fin-de-siècle Leipzig.
Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Margin , April no. 71 2007; (p. 35-41)

— Review of Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage : 1834-1899 2006 anthology drama
Untitled Veronica Kelly , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Australasian Drama Studies , April no. 50 2007; (p. 202-207)

— Review of Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage : 1834-1899 2006 anthology drama
Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage Meg Tasker , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 6 no. 1 2007; (p. 129-132)

— Review of Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage : 1834-1899 2006 anthology drama
Untitled Louise D'Arcens , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Theatre Research International , no. 32 2007; (p. 336-337)

— Review of Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage : 1834-1899 2006 anthology drama
Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Margin , April no. 71 2007; (p. 35-41)

— Review of Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage : 1834-1899 2006 anthology drama
Untitled Veronica Kelly , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Australasian Drama Studies , April no. 50 2007; (p. 202-207)

— Review of Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage : 1834-1899 2006 anthology drama
Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage Meg Tasker , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 6 no. 1 2007; (p. 129-132)

— Review of Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage : 1834-1899 2006 anthology drama
Untitled Robert Dixon , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Archiv fur das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen , no. 1 2008; (p. 196-198)

— Review of Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage : 1834-1899 2006 anthology drama ; The Collected Verse of Mary Gilmore Mary Gilmore 2004-2007 collected work poetry
The two books under review are, respectively, the seventh and eighth volumes to appear in the estimable Academy Editions of Australian Literature series. Initiated in 1992 under the general editorship of Professor Paul Eggert, the series is the first to provide modern scholarly editions of the key works of Australian literature, including reliable reading texts and contextual annotation based on rigorous scholarship and thorough textual collation. Previous volumes of especial interest to European readers include Marcus Clarke's His Natural Life (1874); Catherine Martin's An Australian Girl (1890), which draws extensively on the context of nineteenth-century European thought; and Henry Handel Richardson's Maurice Guest (1908), which is set in the musical world of fin-de-siècle Leipzig.
Untitled Louise D'Arcens , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Theatre Research International , no. 32 2007; (p. 336-337)

— Review of Australian Plays for the Colonial Stage : 1834-1899 2006 anthology drama
Transnational Connectivities of Whiteness : American Blackface in Life in Sydney Ben Miller , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 151-166)
'This chapter considers a form of entertainment popular during the nineteenth century in America and Australia - blackface entertainment - to investigate some connections between the two nations. This chapter suggests that blackface entertainment was one of an array of technologies that encoded transnational views about nation, class and race. During the 1830s and 1840s, in both America and Australia, discourses of otherness energised and united a transnational community of white workers who challenged the social and cultural authority of the upper classes at the same time as asserting their authority over racial minorities.' (p. 151)
Last amended 29 Jun 2006 17:54:19
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