5891856194505041815.jpg
This image has been sourced from online
y The Conversations at Curlow Creek single work   novel  
  • Author: David Malouf http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/malouf-david
Issue Details: First known date: 1996 1996
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The year is 1827, and in a remote hut on the high plains of New South Wales, two strangers spend the night in talk. One, Carney, an illiterate Irishman, ex-convict and bushranger, is to be hanged at dawn. The other, Adair, also Irish, is an officer of the police who has been sent to supervise the hanging. As the night wears on, the two discover unexpected connections between their lives, and learn new truths. Outside the hut, Adair's troopers sit uneasily, reflecting on their own pasts and futures, waiting for the morning to come. With ironic humour and in prose of starkly evocative power, the novel moves between Australia and Ireland to explore questions of nature and justice, reason and un-reason. , the workings of fate, and the small measure of freedom a man may claim in the face of death.'

Source: Publisher's blurb (Vintage reprint).

Notes

  • Dedication: To Peter Straus.
  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording, large print.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Chatto and Windus , 1996 .
      5891856194505041815.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online
      Extent: 214p.
      ISBN: 0701165715
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Pantheon Books , ca. 1996 .
      Extent: 233p.
      ISBN: 0679442669
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Vintage , 1997 .
      Extent: 214p.
      ISBN: 0099744015
Alternative title: Die Nachtwache am Curlow Creek
Language: German

Works about this Work

Closure, Completion and Memory in Harland's Half Acre : Phil's Story Carolyn Masel , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 2 2014;
'Most of the excellent critical work on this novel deals with the topic that Malouf has identified as its central issue. Frank Harland’s original plan is to buy back his family’s land, lost through gambling and general carelessness, using the proceeds of the sale of his paintings. His thinking has to be radically altered after the death of his nephew and heir. Possession, he comes to realise, is an imaginative thing rather than a physical thing. This essay does not repeat or summarise previous critical contributions, which trace conceptions of non-Indigenous ownership all the way from terra nullius to the ethical ambitions of whiteness studies. Instead, focusing solely on Phil’s story, it deals with the construction and function of memory in the work and on the building of an emotional climax close to its end. It includes discussion of characters’ particular memories, the creation of verbal memories for the reader, and the use of memory to intensify emotion at strategic points of the novel, especially the climax.' (Publication abstract)
'The Restless Energies of Freedom' : Revisiting the Celebration of Queensland History Kay Saunders , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland History Journal , November vol. 21 no. 7 2011; (p. 447-455)
Professor Kay Saunders pursues 'an analysis of those Queensland individuals who helped shape our collective consciousness...Analyzing those whose careers are long finished, or indeed those who reside in the grave or the urn, allow for a more skeptical and balanced approach.' (p. 448)
David Malouf's Haunted Writing Colette Selles , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Ghosts 2010; (p. 269-285)
'The two novels this paper focuses on, Remembering Babylon and The Conversations at Curlow Creek, testify to David Malouf's ongoing 'dialogue with Australia'. Published in 1993 and 1996, two centuries after the arrival of the First Fleet of convicts, they engage with crucial issues in a postcolonial Australia which still has to negotiate its existential uncertainty. By returning to the first half of the nineteenth century, the narratives face the ghosts of the past which have haunted Australia, notably the stain of its origins as a penal colony: a sense of exile to the edge of the world is combined with the legacy of historical wrongs, the atrocities of the convict system and the devastating impact of colonization on the Aboriginal peoples - from dispossession to massacre or assimilationist policies which have engendered social alienation and spiritual dislocation.' (p. 270)
y Witnessing Australian Stories : History, Testimony and Memory in Contemporary Culture Kelly Jean Butler , Melbourne : 2010 6037495 2010 single work thesis

'This book is about how Australians have responded to stories about suffering and injustice in Australia, presented in a range of public media, including literature, history, films, and television. Those who have responded are both ordinary and prominent Australians–politicians, writers, and scholars. All have sought to come to terms with Australia's history by responding empathetically to stories of its marginalized citizens.

'Drawing upon international scholarship on collective memory, public history, testimony, and witnessing, this book represents a cultural history of contemporary Australia. It examines the forms of witnessing that dominated Australian public culture at the turn of the millennium. Since the late 1980s, witnessing has developed in Australia in response to the increasingly audible voices of indigenous peoples, migrants, and more recently, asylum seekers. As these voices became public, they posed a challenge not only to scholars and politicians, but also, most importantly, to ordinary citizens.

'When former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd delivered his historic apology to Australia's indigenous peoples in February 2008, he performed an act of collective witnessing that affirmed the testimony and experiences of Aboriginal Australians. The phenomenon of witnessing became crucial, not only to the recognition and reparation of past injustices, but to efforts to create a more cosmopolitan Australia in the present. This is a vital addition to Transactions critically acclaimed Memory and Narrative series.' (Publisher's blurb)

Reserviors of Desire Xavier Pons , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Messengers of Eros : Representations of Sex in Australian Writing 2009; (p. 11-37)
Homoeroticism in David Malouf's Fiction Xavier Pons , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Messengers of Eros : Representations of Sex in Australian Writing 2009; (p. 271-292)

'David Malouf is hardly a gay icon. Although he has never kept his homosexuality a secret, neither has he flaunted it, either in his life or in his writings. Where the latter are concerned, there is no doubt that Malouf doesn't want to be pigeonholed, that he rejects restrictive levels that would do an injustice to his wide-ranging preoccupations and his considerable appeal to all manner of readers.' (p. 271)

Religion, Class and Nation in Contemporary Australian Fiction Stella Borgk Barthet , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 31 no. 1 2009; (p. 83-94)
'This article tackles the charge of elitism levelled at some Australian writers by Australian critics and suggests that these assessments may be biased because of an over-emphasis on class. This kind of criticism connects elitism with the writers' appropriation of the spiritual for the endorsement of the nation, and either rejects works that treat the spiritual, or it refuses to acknowledge a spiritual element in writing that is accepted for its working-class ethos. Through readings of David Malouf's The Conversation at Curlow Creek and Thomas Keneally's A Family Madness and The Office of Innocence, I question the connection that has been made between high literariness and the symbolic endorsement of the White nation in Australia.' Source: The author.
National Mythologies and Secret Histories: Faultlines in the Bark Hut in Some Recent Australian Fiction Carol Merli , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southern Postcolonialisms: The Global South and the 'New' Literary Representations 2009; (p. 205-217)
Representations of Irishness in Contemporary Australian Fiction Representações de ser irlandês na ficção australiana contemporânea Stella Borgk Barthet , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Acta Scientiarum. Language and Culture , January vol. 30 no. 1 2008; (p. 45-51)
Australian history generates great fervour in intellectual and political circles in present-day Australia, and Ireland's contribution to the making of the continent is a hotly debated issue. This essay deals with Irishness in contemporary Australian fiction with a 19th century setting. The representations I will be exploring concern the Convict, the Bushranger, and the Catholic. I have put these three figures in ascending order, according to the degree of Irishness that they tend to carry with them in contemporary Australian fiction. If we are dealing with a convict; then the character may or may not be Irish; if a bush-ranger, then he is more likely than not to be Irish; if the character is Catholic, then he is certainly Irish.

A história da Austrália causa grandes debates intelectuais e políticos na Austrália contemporânea e a contribuição irlandesa na construção e no desenvolvimento do continente suscita muitas discussões. Esse artigo analisa a qualidade de ser irlandês, na ficçãoaustraliana contemporânea, tendo o século XIX como pano de fundo. Discute-se a representação do detento, do mateiro e do católico, colocados em ordem ascendente na medida em que encarnam o grau de qualidade de irlandês que cada um carrega na ficção australiana. Se o personagem é um detento, pode ou não pode ser irlandês; se é um mateiro, provavelmente é um irlandês; se o personagem é católico, com certeza é irlandês. (Author's abstract)
Archetypes of Partnership and the Goddess : The Human Spiritual Journey in David Malouf's 'The Conversations at Curlow Creek' Antonella Riem Natale , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Goddess Awakened : Partnership Studies in Literatures, Language and Education 2007; (p. 57-71)
Echoes of the Other : Translating David Malouf into Italian Franca Cavagnoli , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Goddess Awakened : Partnership Studies in Literatures, Language and Education 2007; (p. 73-82)
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
y The Transformation of Political Identity from Commonwealth through Postcolonial Literature : The Cases of Nadine Gordimer, David Malouf and Michael Ondaatje Lamia Tayeb , Lewiston : Edwin Mellen Press , 2006 Z1411707 2006 single work criticism
Of Land, of Light : The Colonial Landscape in Malouf and Koch Maureen Lynch Percopo , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Paesaggi australiani / Australian Landscapes 2004; (p. 93-116)
Resistance and Reconcilation in David Malouf's The Conversations at Curlow Creek Stella Borgk Barthet , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Resistance and Reconciliation : Writing in the Commonwealth 2003; (p. 265-277)
Lives Without Letters : The Illiterate Other in An Imaginary Life, Remembering Babylon and The Conversations at Curlow Creek Helga Ramsey-Kurz , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ariel , April-July vol. 34 no. 2-3 2003; (p. 115-133)
Australia and the Wholeness of Meaning : Reasoning and Art at Curlow Creek Dennis Haskell , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: 'Unemployed at Last!' : Essays on Australian Literature to 2002 for Julian Croft 2002; (p. 133-146)
Explores the notion of wholeness - in individual and national terms - in Malouf's novel.
The Paradoxes of Marginalisation : David Malouf and the 'Great World' Marc Delrez , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Global and the Particular in the English Speaking World 2002; (p. 97-105)
Alchemical Tropes of Irish Diaspora in David Malouf's Conversations at Curlow Creek and Remembering Babylon James Bulman-May , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Nordic-Irish Studies , no. 1 2002; (p. 63-76)
'Wrong Side of the Mirror' : Exile in David Malouf's The Conversations at Curlow Creek Xavier Pons , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Flight from Certainty : The Dilemma of Identity and Exile 2001; (p. 140-152)
Untitled Nikki Barrowclough , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Good Weekend , 24 August 1996; (p. 14)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
Hanging Between Two Worlds A. P. Riemer , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 31 August 1996; (p. 11s)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
Existence : Clothed in Hope Katharine England , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 7 September 1996; (p. 11)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
Journey into the Light Rosemary Sorensen , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 7 September 1996; (p. 7)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
At the Edge of Settlement Chris Wallace-Crabbe , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 7 September p,8 1996;

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
Death at Dawn David Matthews , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 7-8 September 1996; (p. rev 7)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
Consciously Classical Robert Gray , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian's Review of Books , September vol. 1 no. 1 1996; (p. 10-11,31)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
States of Mind: Dialogues with a Doomed Man Ralph Elliott , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 14 September 1996; (p. C10)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
The Dangers of Intimacy Ivor Indyk , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 15 September 1996; (p. 7)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
The Eve of Execution Bernard O'Donoghue , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 13 September no. 4876 1996; (p. 22)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
Worlds Apart as Death Closes In Peter Pierce , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 24 September vol. 116 no. 6039 1996; (p. 80-81)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
Malouf's Operatic New Novel Nicholas Jose , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 184 1996; (p. 8-9) Australian Humanities Review , September - November no. 3 1996;

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
Tall Tales, but True? Peter Craven , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Eureka Street , October vol. 6 no. 8 1996; (p. 38-41)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel ; Night Letters : A Journey Through Switzerland and Italy Edited and Annotated by Igor Miazmov Robert Dessaix 1996 single work novel
Pick of the Month 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , August vol. 76 no. 1072 1996; (p. 36)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
Untitled David Gaunt , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , July vol. 76 no. 1071 1996; (p. 48)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
Untitled Philip Neilsen , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , Summer vol. 8 no. 3 1996; (p. 129-131)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
Hybrid Heroes Janette Turner Hospital , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: London Review of Books , 12 December vol. 18 no. 24 1996; (p. 27)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
The Focus of Our Imagination A. P. Riemer , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Voices , Summer (1996-1997) vol. 6 no. 4 1996; (p. 112-115)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel ; Night Letters : A Journey Through Switzerland and Italy Edited and Annotated by Igor Miazmov Robert Dessaix 1996 single work novel ; The Island in the Mind Rodney Hall 1996 selected work novel
Robin Hood in Australia Brooke Allen , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 19 January 1997; (p. 11)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel
Some Local Dantes Judith Armstrong , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Winter no. 147 1997; (p. 83-85)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel ; Highways to a War Christopher Koch 1995 single work novel ; Keep It Simple, Stupid Peter Goldsworthy 1996 single work novel ; The Island in the Mind Rodney Hall 1996 selected work novel ; The Drowner Robert Drewe 1996 single work novel ; Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Australia and the Wholeness of Meaning : Reasoning and Art at Curlow Creek Dennis Haskell , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: 'Unemployed at Last!' : Essays on Australian Literature to 2002 for Julian Croft 2002; (p. 133-146)
Explores the notion of wholeness - in individual and national terms - in Malouf's novel.
Resistance and Reconcilation in David Malouf's The Conversations at Curlow Creek Stella Borgk Barthet , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Resistance and Reconciliation : Writing in the Commonwealth 2003; (p. 265-277)
The Paradoxes of Marginalisation : David Malouf and the 'Great World' Marc Delrez , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Global and the Particular in the English Speaking World 2002; (p. 97-105)
Alchemical Tropes of Irish Diaspora in David Malouf's Conversations at Curlow Creek and Remembering Babylon James Bulman-May , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Nordic-Irish Studies , no. 1 2002; (p. 63-76)
'Wrong Side of the Mirror' : Exile in David Malouf's The Conversations at Curlow Creek Xavier Pons , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Flight from Certainty : The Dilemma of Identity and Exile 2001; (p. 140-152)
Of Land, of Light : The Colonial Landscape in Malouf and Koch Maureen Lynch Percopo , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Paesaggi australiani / Australian Landscapes 2004; (p. 93-116)
Lives Without Letters : The Illiterate Other in An Imaginary Life, Remembering Babylon and The Conversations at Curlow Creek Helga Ramsey-Kurz , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ariel , April-July vol. 34 no. 2-3 2003; (p. 115-133)
y The Transformation of Political Identity from Commonwealth through Postcolonial Literature : The Cases of Nadine Gordimer, David Malouf and Michael Ondaatje Lamia Tayeb , Lewiston : Edwin Mellen Press , 2006 Z1411707 2006 single work criticism
Archetypes of Partnership and the Goddess : The Human Spiritual Journey in David Malouf's 'The Conversations at Curlow Creek' Antonella Riem Natale , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Goddess Awakened : Partnership Studies in Literatures, Language and Education 2007; (p. 57-71)
Echoes of the Other : Translating David Malouf into Italian Franca Cavagnoli , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Goddess Awakened : Partnership Studies in Literatures, Language and Education 2007; (p. 73-82)
Representations of Irishness in Contemporary Australian Fiction Representações de ser irlandês na ficção australiana contemporânea Stella Borgk Barthet , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Acta Scientiarum. Language and Culture , January vol. 30 no. 1 2008; (p. 45-51)
Australian history generates great fervour in intellectual and political circles in present-day Australia, and Ireland's contribution to the making of the continent is a hotly debated issue. This essay deals with Irishness in contemporary Australian fiction with a 19th century setting. The representations I will be exploring concern the Convict, the Bushranger, and the Catholic. I have put these three figures in ascending order, according to the degree of Irishness that they tend to carry with them in contemporary Australian fiction. If we are dealing with a convict; then the character may or may not be Irish; if a bush-ranger, then he is more likely than not to be Irish; if the character is Catholic, then he is certainly Irish.

A história da Austrália causa grandes debates intelectuais e políticos na Austrália contemporânea e a contribuição irlandesa na construção e no desenvolvimento do continente suscita muitas discussões. Esse artigo analisa a qualidade de ser irlandês, na ficçãoaustraliana contemporânea, tendo o século XIX como pano de fundo. Discute-se a representação do detento, do mateiro e do católico, colocados em ordem ascendente na medida em que encarnam o grau de qualidade de irlandês que cada um carrega na ficção australiana. Se o personagem é um detento, pode ou não pode ser irlandês; se é um mateiro, provavelmente é um irlandês; se o personagem é católico, com certeza é irlandês. (Author's abstract)
Reserviors of Desire Xavier Pons , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Messengers of Eros : Representations of Sex in Australian Writing 2009; (p. 11-37)
Homoeroticism in David Malouf's Fiction Xavier Pons , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Messengers of Eros : Representations of Sex in Australian Writing 2009; (p. 271-292)

'David Malouf is hardly a gay icon. Although he has never kept his homosexuality a secret, neither has he flaunted it, either in his life or in his writings. Where the latter are concerned, there is no doubt that Malouf doesn't want to be pigeonholed, that he rejects restrictive levels that would do an injustice to his wide-ranging preoccupations and his considerable appeal to all manner of readers.' (p. 271)

Religion, Class and Nation in Contemporary Australian Fiction Stella Borgk Barthet , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 31 no. 1 2009; (p. 83-94)
'This article tackles the charge of elitism levelled at some Australian writers by Australian critics and suggests that these assessments may be biased because of an over-emphasis on class. This kind of criticism connects elitism with the writers' appropriation of the spiritual for the endorsement of the nation, and either rejects works that treat the spiritual, or it refuses to acknowledge a spiritual element in writing that is accepted for its working-class ethos. Through readings of David Malouf's The Conversation at Curlow Creek and Thomas Keneally's A Family Madness and The Office of Innocence, I question the connection that has been made between high literariness and the symbolic endorsement of the White nation in Australia.' Source: The author.
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
David Malouf's Haunted Writing Colette Selles , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Ghosts 2010; (p. 269-285)
'The two novels this paper focuses on, Remembering Babylon and The Conversations at Curlow Creek, testify to David Malouf's ongoing 'dialogue with Australia'. Published in 1993 and 1996, two centuries after the arrival of the First Fleet of convicts, they engage with crucial issues in a postcolonial Australia which still has to negotiate its existential uncertainty. By returning to the first half of the nineteenth century, the narratives face the ghosts of the past which have haunted Australia, notably the stain of its origins as a penal colony: a sense of exile to the edge of the world is combined with the legacy of historical wrongs, the atrocities of the convict system and the devastating impact of colonization on the Aboriginal peoples - from dispossession to massacre or assimilationist policies which have engendered social alienation and spiritual dislocation.' (p. 270)
'The Restless Energies of Freedom' : Revisiting the Celebration of Queensland History Kay Saunders , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland History Journal , November vol. 21 no. 7 2011; (p. 447-455)
Professor Kay Saunders pursues 'an analysis of those Queensland individuals who helped shape our collective consciousness...Analyzing those whose careers are long finished, or indeed those who reside in the grave or the urn, allow for a more skeptical and balanced approach.' (p. 448)
National Mythologies and Secret Histories: Faultlines in the Bark Hut in Some Recent Australian Fiction Carol Merli , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southern Postcolonialisms: The Global South and the 'New' Literary Representations 2009; (p. 205-217)
The Elemental David Malouf Jan Dalley , 1996 single work biography
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 18 August 1996; (p. 18)
Malouf Reveals New Irish-Theme Novel 1996 single work column biography
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 17 June 1996; (p. 5)
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