y D. H. Lawrence, Science and the Posthuman multi chapter work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2005 2005
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  • Contents indexed selectively.
  • Dedication: to Nina and Robin
  • We wait for the miracle, for the new soft wind. Even the buds of iron break into the soft little flames of issue. So will people change. So will the machine-parts open like buds and the great machines break into leaf. (D. H. Lawrence, The Symbolic Meaning)


* Contents derived from the Basingstoke, Hampshire,
United Kingdom (UK),
Western Europe, Europe,
Palgrave Macmillan , 2005 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Fox and Kangaroo: 'Non-Human Human Being', Jeff Wallace , 2005 single work criticism
Wallace argues that in The Fox (1923) and Kangaroo (1923) 'the human being is an animal. He discusses the meaning of this equivalence by examining the differences suggested through the narrative form of the two works.
(p. 141-146)
Aaron's Rod, Kangaroo, The Plumed Serpent: Anti-Capitalism and the Post-Humanistic, Jeff Wallace , 2005 single work criticism
Wallace collectively views three of Lawrence's 1920s novels: Aaron's Rod, Kangaroo and The Plumed Serpent. He suggests that they 'represent a departure or leave-taking from the illusionist conventions of the realist novel to which, despite marked stylistic-modernistic idiosynracies, Lawrence's earlier fiction had adhered ... In each case the exiled, nomadic protagonist finds in an alternative culture - Italy, Australia, Mexico - a context in which to cease to care about conventional human values, to lapse into a state of isolation or, in the key word of Kangaroo, "indifference".'
(p. 218-227)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Last amended 1 Dec 2005
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