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Screen cap from promotional trailer
form y Wolf Creek single work   film/TV   horror   thriller  
Issue Details: First known date: 2005 2005
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Inspired in part by some unsolved murders in the Australian outback, and by the gruesome backpacker murders committed by Ivan Milat in NSW during the late 1980s/early 1990s, Wolf Creek tells the story of three young backpackers, Ben Mitchell, an Australian, and Liz Hunter and Kristy Earl, both English. Although the girls don't know Ben all that well, he and Liz fancy each other. After buying a car in Broome, situated in the far north coast of Western Australia, the trio head east with the intention of driving across the top end to Cairns (Queensland). At the end of their first day in the desert, their car breaks down at a deserted tourist site - the large crater of a meteorite. Later that night a truck arrives, driven by a real outback character, Mick Taylor. He tows them to his isolated camp at an abandoned mine site, promising to fix their car. All three tourists fall asleep after Mick drugs them. When Liz wakes up, she is bound and gagged and her friends are missing and the nightmare begins.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Plans to Make a Killing with Wolf Creek’s TV Adaptation Michael Idato , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 16 February 2015; (p. 7)
Journey as Important as the Destination Karl Quinn , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 16 August 2015; (p. 18)
Celluloid Nightmares : The Wolf in the Flannel Shirt Mark Smith-Briggs , 2015 single work essay
— Appears in: Midnight Echo : The Magazine of the Australian Horror Writers Association , April no. 11 2015; (p. 101-104)
Author Interview : Wolf Creek Prequel Authors : Aaron Sterns and Brett McBean Gerry Huntman (interviewer), 2014 single work interview
— Appears in: SQ Mag , 30 April no. 14 2014;
The Imagined Desert Tom Drahos , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 11 2013; (p. 148-161)
'The following analysis of the Australian Outback as an imagined space is informed by theories describing a separation from the objective physical world and the mapping of its representative double through language, and draws upon a reading of the function of landscape in three fictions; Joseph Conrad's novella Heart of Darkness (1899), Greg Mclean's 2005 horror film Wolf Creek and Ted Kotcheff's 1971 cinematic adaptation of Kenneth Cook's novel Wake in Fright . I would like to consider the Outback as a culturally produced text, and compare the function of this landscape as a cultural 'reality' to the function of landscape in literary and cinematic fiction.' (Author's abstract)
Australian Psycho Harry Windsor , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 13-14 July 2013; (p. 16-17)
'Violent crime films take realism to a new level and pierce the myth of mateship, writes Harry Windsor.'
Making the Cut Ed Gibbs , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 22 April 2012; (p. 6)
Wolf Creek Villan Set for revenge in Sequel Tristan Swanwick , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 7 September 2012; (p. 33)
Murder they Wrote, and It Still Works Adam Fulton , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 18 May 2011; (p. 14)
Movie Ratings Miss their Target Michael Bodey , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 6 July 2011; (p. 17)
Dark or violent films are increasingly avoiding an R18+ tag.
y Reel Locations : The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films Anthony Roberts , Prahran : Explore Australia , 2011 Z1793927 2011 single work prose travel 'Did you know that because baby pigs grow at an alarming rate, 48 pigs were used for the filming of Babe? Or that the town of Poowong in South Gippsland was selected for the premier of Kenny? Reel Locations: The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films is a book for anyone with an interest in Australian films - and for those wanting to relive the magic that was created. Covering 20 iconic Australian flicks, film buff Anthony Roberts not only details what locations were used for particular scenes, but also offers travel information on what you'll see if you visit these locations now, as well as where to eat and where to stay. A vibrant design, film stills and many quirky facts round out this enjoyable book that is ideal for both armchair travellers and eager tourists.' (Publisher's blurb)
y Wolf Creek Sonya Hartnett , Strawberry Hills Canberra : Currency Press National Film and Sound Archive , 2011 Z1803059 2011 single work criticism 'In 2005, the horror film Wolf Creek depicted the abduction and torture of three backpackers in the Australian outback, and created an immediate industry and media frenzy. Wolf Creek tapped into the myth of the lonely continent, a fear of the country's hostility and its indifference to suffering, traits which have been deeply etched into our national psyche by real life events such as the Milat and Murdoch murders. Sonya Hartnett takes the hard landscape and the rogue men who inhabit these spaces and evokes the surrealistic terror which continues to fascinate outsiders and locals.' Source: www.currency.com.au/ (Sighted 01/09/2011).
Film Andrew Fenton , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 22 December 2011; (p. 51)
This year's awards coincide with a resurgence in Australian film, commercial and critical successes vying for Glory
An Apocalyptic Landscape : The Mad Max Films Roslyn Weaver , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Apocalypse in Australian Fiction and Film : A Critical Study 2011; (p. 83-107)
In this chapter Roslyn Weaver explores 'the three Mad Max films to consider their contribution to the apocalyptic tradition. In these texts, the outback is 'the nothing,' a threatening place that is hostile to humans. The trilogy reveals future disaster and appears to envisage a better new world, but then subverts apocalyptic hope by suggesting the new world is a false ideal because it only exists far from the Australian landscape and even then only exists far from the Australian landscape and even then only in ruined, decayed form. The repeated dismissals of hope and the negative image of the Australian landscape undercut any security of feeling at home, presenting instead a picture of exile and punishment in the desert.' (83)
Rumblings from Australia's Deep South : Tasmanian Gothic On-Screen Emily Bullock , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , 6 April vol. 5 no. 1 2011; (p. 71-80)
'This article examines the current cinematic attention to Tasmania and its stories, with particular attention paid to the Gothic mode. 'Tasmanian Gothic' has become a by-word for the unsettling combination of Tasmania's colonial histories and its harsh landscapes in literature, but its cinematic counterpart has virtually been ignored. It is suggested that Tasmania is experiencing a renaissance on the big screen and it is the Gothic that appears to be the most dominant mode through which it is pictured. The article then charts a history of local Tasmanian Gothic cinematic production, a hybrid vision that tends towards a combination of stylistic, thematic, historical and geographic elements. Tasmanian Gothic cinema refers not simply to productions by Tasmanian film-makers, but to the broader on-screen representation of the island, its culture and histories by a range of local, interstate and international crews. As this article suggests, Gothic cinematic representations of Tasmania are yoked by a number of persistent concerns that act in dialogue with the unique cultural and geographic positioning of Australia's only island state.' (Author's abstract)
Jarratt Reprises Wolf Creek Villain’s Role Tristan Swanwick , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 7 October 2010; (p. 29)
Film Fest Fans Dial F for Forgery Tristan Swanwick , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 11 November 2010; (p. 28)
Wolf Creek, Rurality and the Australian Gothic John Scott , Dean Biron , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 24 no. 2 2010; (p. 307 - 322)
'As with Crocodile Dundee before it, the recent Australian film Wolf Creek promotes a specific and arguably urban-centric understanding of rural Australia. However, whilst the former film is couched in mythologized notions of the rural idyll, Wolf Creek is based firmly around the concept of rural horror. Wolf Creek is both a horror movie and a road movie, one which relies heavily upon landscape in order to tell its story. Here we argue that the film continues a tradition in the New Australian Cinema of depicting the outback and its inhabitants as something the country's mostly coastal population do not understand. Wolf Creek skilfully plays on popular conceptions of inland Australia as empty and harsh. But more than this, the film brings to the fore tensions in the rural idyll associated with the ownership and use of rural space. As an object of urban consumption, rural space may appear passive and familiar, but in the context of rural horror iconic aspects of the Australian landscape become a source of fear - a space of abjection.'(Author's abstract)
Unsuitable Material Ben Kooyman , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kill Your Darlings , October no. 3 2010; (p. 55-59)
Ben Kooyman writes on the fate of R-Rated Films
The Cars That Ate the Picnic at Wolf Creek: A Symposium on Australian Horror Films David Carroll , Lee Battersby , Robert Hood , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australian Weird Fiction , no. 3 2009; (p. 147-166)
Critics David Carroll, Robert Hood and Lee Battersby answer several questions posed by Studies in Australian Weird Fiction and provide fans of the genre with personal insights and interpretations never before discussed, spotlighting a variety of old and modern films.
Highway to Hell Des Partridge , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 29 - 30 October 2005; (p. 1-2)

— Review of Wolf Creek Greg McLean 2005 single work film/TV
A True Blue Psycho Liam Phillips , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 2 November 2005; (p. 8)

— Review of Wolf Creek Greg McLean 2005 single work film/TV
Wolf Creek (Greg Mclean, 2005) William “Bill” Blick , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , no. 52 2009;

— Review of Wolf Creek Greg McLean 2005 single work film/TV
Up the Creek Charles Purcell , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 28 October 2005; (p. 4)
The Cars That Ate the Picnic at Wolf Creek: A Symposium on Australian Horror Films David Carroll , Lee Battersby , Robert Hood , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australian Weird Fiction , no. 3 2009; (p. 147-166)
Critics David Carroll, Robert Hood and Lee Battersby answer several questions posed by Studies in Australian Weird Fiction and provide fans of the genre with personal insights and interpretations never before discussed, spotlighting a variety of old and modern films.
Top Five Oz Road Films Gillian Cumming , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 20 December 2009; (p. 12)
The Murderous State : The Naturalisation of Violence and Exclusion in The Films of Neoliberal Australia Jon Stratton , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , vol. 15 no. 1 2009; (p. 11-32)
Dying to Come to Australia : Asylum Seekers, Tourists and Death Jon Stratton , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Our Patch : Enacting Australian Sovereignty Post-2001 2007; (p. 167-196) Imagined Australia : Reflections around the Reciprocal Construction of Identity between Australia and Europe 2009; (p. 57-87)
Jarratt Reprises Wolf Creek Villain’s Role Tristan Swanwick , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 7 October 2010; (p. 29)
Film Fest Fans Dial F for Forgery Tristan Swanwick , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 11 November 2010; (p. 28)
Murder they Wrote, and It Still Works Adam Fulton , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 18 May 2011; (p. 14)
Editor's Introduction to the Unaustralia Papers Paul Magee , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 21 no. 4 2007; (p. 461 - 467)
Wolf Creek : An UnAustralian Story? Gemma Blackwood , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 21 no. 4 2007; (p. 489 - 497)
Wolf Creek, Rurality and the Australian Gothic John Scott , Dean Biron , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 24 no. 2 2010; (p. 307 - 322)
'As with Crocodile Dundee before it, the recent Australian film Wolf Creek promotes a specific and arguably urban-centric understanding of rural Australia. However, whilst the former film is couched in mythologized notions of the rural idyll, Wolf Creek is based firmly around the concept of rural horror. Wolf Creek is both a horror movie and a road movie, one which relies heavily upon landscape in order to tell its story. Here we argue that the film continues a tradition in the New Australian Cinema of depicting the outback and its inhabitants as something the country's mostly coastal population do not understand. Wolf Creek skilfully plays on popular conceptions of inland Australia as empty and harsh. But more than this, the film brings to the fore tensions in the rural idyll associated with the ownership and use of rural space. As an object of urban consumption, rural space may appear passive and familiar, but in the context of rural horror iconic aspects of the Australian landscape become a source of fear - a space of abjection.'(Author's abstract)
Movie Ratings Miss their Target Michael Bodey , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 6 July 2011; (p. 17)
Dark or violent films are increasingly avoiding an R18+ tag.
y Reel Locations : The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films Anthony Roberts , Prahran : Explore Australia , 2011 Z1793927 2011 single work prose travel 'Did you know that because baby pigs grow at an alarming rate, 48 pigs were used for the filming of Babe? Or that the town of Poowong in South Gippsland was selected for the premier of Kenny? Reel Locations: The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films is a book for anyone with an interest in Australian films - and for those wanting to relive the magic that was created. Covering 20 iconic Australian flicks, film buff Anthony Roberts not only details what locations were used for particular scenes, but also offers travel information on what you'll see if you visit these locations now, as well as where to eat and where to stay. A vibrant design, film stills and many quirky facts round out this enjoyable book that is ideal for both armchair travellers and eager tourists.' (Publisher's blurb)
y Wolf Creek Sonya Hartnett , Strawberry Hills Canberra : Currency Press National Film and Sound Archive , 2011 Z1803059 2011 single work criticism 'In 2005, the horror film Wolf Creek depicted the abduction and torture of three backpackers in the Australian outback, and created an immediate industry and media frenzy. Wolf Creek tapped into the myth of the lonely continent, a fear of the country's hostility and its indifference to suffering, traits which have been deeply etched into our national psyche by real life events such as the Milat and Murdoch murders. Sonya Hartnett takes the hard landscape and the rogue men who inhabit these spaces and evokes the surrealistic terror which continues to fascinate outsiders and locals.' Source: www.currency.com.au/ (Sighted 01/09/2011).
Unsuitable Material Ben Kooyman , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kill Your Darlings , October no. 3 2010; (p. 55-59)
Ben Kooyman writes on the fate of R-Rated Films
Film Andrew Fenton , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 22 December 2011; (p. 51)
This year's awards coincide with a resurgence in Australian film, commercial and critical successes vying for Glory
Making the Cut Ed Gibbs , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 22 April 2012; (p. 6)
An Apocalyptic Landscape : The Mad Max Films Roslyn Weaver , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Apocalypse in Australian Fiction and Film : A Critical Study 2011; (p. 83-107)
In this chapter Roslyn Weaver explores 'the three Mad Max films to consider their contribution to the apocalyptic tradition. In these texts, the outback is 'the nothing,' a threatening place that is hostile to humans. The trilogy reveals future disaster and appears to envisage a better new world, but then subverts apocalyptic hope by suggesting the new world is a false ideal because it only exists far from the Australian landscape and even then only exists far from the Australian landscape and even then only in ruined, decayed form. The repeated dismissals of hope and the negative image of the Australian landscape undercut any security of feeling at home, presenting instead a picture of exile and punishment in the desert.' (83)
Rumblings from Australia's Deep South : Tasmanian Gothic On-Screen Emily Bullock , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , 6 April vol. 5 no. 1 2011; (p. 71-80)
'This article examines the current cinematic attention to Tasmania and its stories, with particular attention paid to the Gothic mode. 'Tasmanian Gothic' has become a by-word for the unsettling combination of Tasmania's colonial histories and its harsh landscapes in literature, but its cinematic counterpart has virtually been ignored. It is suggested that Tasmania is experiencing a renaissance on the big screen and it is the Gothic that appears to be the most dominant mode through which it is pictured. The article then charts a history of local Tasmanian Gothic cinematic production, a hybrid vision that tends towards a combination of stylistic, thematic, historical and geographic elements. Tasmanian Gothic cinema refers not simply to productions by Tasmanian film-makers, but to the broader on-screen representation of the island, its culture and histories by a range of local, interstate and international crews. As this article suggests, Gothic cinematic representations of Tasmania are yoked by a number of persistent concerns that act in dialogue with the unique cultural and geographic positioning of Australia's only island state.' (Author's abstract)
Wolf Creek Villan Set for revenge in Sequel Tristan Swanwick , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 7 September 2012; (p. 33)
Last amended 16 Oct 2014 13:22:17
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