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Cover image courtesy of Pan Macmillan.
y Food, Sex & Money single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2005 2005
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Bonnie, rocked by the death of her husband, is back in Australia after decades in Europe, and is discovering that while financial security eliminates worry, it doesn't guarantee a fulfilling life. Fran, long divorced, is a struggling freelance food writer, battling with her diet, her bank balance and her relationship with her adult children. And Sylvia, marooned in a long and passionless marriage to an ambitious Anglican minister, is facing a crisis that will crack her world wide open. Together again, sharing their past lives, secrets, aspirations and deepest fears, Bonnie, Fran and Sylvia embark on a creative venture that will challenge everything they thought they knew about themselves and give them more second chances than they could ever have imagined.' -- Back cover.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Language: French

Works about this Work

Getting Noticed : Images of Older Women in Australian Popular Culture Liz Byrski , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 2 no. 2010;
'Despite the fact that women over the age of 45 buy more books than any other demographic group they rarely feature as the central characters in Australian popular fiction. When they do appear it is usually in minor roles where they are characterised in negatively stereotypical ways. This paper argues that by ignoring older women as subjects and consumers, creators, producers and publishers of the products of popular culture fail to provide realistic and sympathetic representations of older women thus rendering them invisible to themselves and to others. It includes a case study of my own attempts to address this representational black hole through the writing and publishing of five novels in the genre of feminist realism, focused on the lives of women between the ages of 50 and 85. It records the success of these books in the commercial publishing market place where they are now all Australian bestsellers and two have reached the top ten fiction on the NeilsenBookscan.' (Author's abstract)
Look Back In Angst Angela Parker , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 7 February 2006; (p. 6)

— Review of Food, Sex & Money Liz Byrski 2005 single work novel
Bring Disgrace on the Family Kathy Hunt , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 1-2 October 2005; (p. 15)

— Review of Food, Sex & Money Liz Byrski 2005 single work novel ; The Last Anniversary Liane Moriarty 2005 single work novel
Less Chick-Lit than Hen-Lit Danielle Benda , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 24 October 2005; (p. 6)

— Review of Food, Sex & Money Liz Byrski 2005 single work novel
Bring Disgrace on the Family Kathy Hunt , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 1-2 October 2005; (p. 15)

— Review of Food, Sex & Money Liz Byrski 2005 single work novel ; The Last Anniversary Liane Moriarty 2005 single work novel
Less Chick-Lit than Hen-Lit Danielle Benda , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 24 October 2005; (p. 6)

— Review of Food, Sex & Money Liz Byrski 2005 single work novel
Look Back In Angst Angela Parker , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 7 February 2006; (p. 6)

— Review of Food, Sex & Money Liz Byrski 2005 single work novel
Getting Noticed : Images of Older Women in Australian Popular Culture Liz Byrski , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 2 no. 2010;
'Despite the fact that women over the age of 45 buy more books than any other demographic group they rarely feature as the central characters in Australian popular fiction. When they do appear it is usually in minor roles where they are characterised in negatively stereotypical ways. This paper argues that by ignoring older women as subjects and consumers, creators, producers and publishers of the products of popular culture fail to provide realistic and sympathetic representations of older women thus rendering them invisible to themselves and to others. It includes a case study of my own attempts to address this representational black hole through the writing and publishing of five novels in the genre of feminist realism, focused on the lives of women between the ages of 50 and 85. It records the success of these books in the commercial publishing market place where they are now all Australian bestsellers and two have reached the top ten fiction on the NeilsenBookscan.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 28 Jan 2014 12:15:06
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