Image courtesy of Pan Macmillan.
y Does My Head Look Big in This? single work   novel   young adult  
Issue Details: First known date: 2005 2005
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Welcome to my world. I'm Amal Abdel-Hakim, a seventeen year-old Australian-Palestinian-Muslim still trying to come to grips with my various identity hyphens. It's hard enough being cool as a teenager when being one issue behind in the latest Cosmo is enough to disqualify you from the in-group. Try wearing a veil on your head and practising the bum's up position at lunchtime and you know you're in for a tough time at school. Luckily my friends support me, although they've got a few troubles of their own. Simone is blonde and gorgeous but has serious image issues and Leila's really intelligent but her parents are more interested in her getting a marriage certificate that her high school certificate! And I thought I had problems...' (Source: back cover).

Adaptations

form y Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah , Australia : 2017 10434130 2017 single work film/TV

Notes

  • Included in the 2006 White Ravens Catalogue compiled by the International Youth Library in Munich, Germany. International understanding.
  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Affiliation Notes

  • This work is affiliated with the AustLit subset Asian-Australian Children's Literature and Publishing because it has been translated into Indonesian, and contains references to Muslim culture and Arabic peoples.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Orchard Books , 2007 .
      Extent: 360p.
      ISBN: 9780439919470 (hbk.), 0439919479 (hbk.)
Alternative title: Ser mitt huvud tjockt ut i den här?
Language: Swedish
    • Stockholm,
      c
      Sweden,
      c
      Scandinavia, Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Bonnier Carlsen Bokforlag , 2005 .
      7976181552783079119.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 350p.
      Reprinted: 2007
      ISBN: 9163853671, 9789163853678
    • Stockholm,
      c
      Sweden,
      c
      Scandinavia, Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Månpocket , 2008 .
      Extent: 350p.
      ISBN: 9789170015816

Works about this Work

Challenging Stereotypes : Randa Abdel-Fattah's Use of Parody in Does My Head Look Big in This? Colin Hains , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 53 no. 2 2015; (p. 30-35)
'This article explores anti-Muslim stereotypes and strategies for combating them as presented in Randa Abdel-Fattah's first novel for young readers, Does My Head Look Big in This? First published in 2005, in the wake of terrorist attacks in the United States and Bali, the novel focuses on the everyday life of a second-generation Palestinian teenager who decides, as she puts it, to wear the hijab "full time" in a predominantly non-Muslim school in Australia. As will be argued here, stereotypes of Muslims and, in particular, Muslim women present not only challenges for the novel's central protagonist but also sites for her intervention. Central to this discussion is theoretical work by Judith Butler, whose notion of parody emphasizes the destabilizing effect that parody has for otherwise oppressive images and stereotypes. Rather than engage in a patient, rational, and didactic discussion with what are essentially impatient and irrational representations, Does My Head Look Big in This? adopts a strategy of parody-an exaggerated, often funny, redeployment of anti-Muslim stereotypes-in order to expose the ignorance wherein they originate. In this way, it will be argued, the protagonist of Abdel-Fattah's novel is not only "challenged" by anti-Muslim stereotypes, she "challenges back."' (Publication abstract)
Minority Identity and Counter-Discourse: Indigenous Australian and Muslim-Australian Authors in The Young Adult Fiction Market Catriona Mills , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : Special Issue Website Series , October no. 32 2015;

'This article traces the increasing participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander authors and Muslim-Australian authors in the Australian young-adult fiction market. Using bibliographical data drawn from the AustLit database, the article first outlines the general parameters of young-adult publishing in Australia since the 1990s, before specifically examining the works produced by Indigenous Australian and Muslim-Australian authors. These two groups share a significant characteristic: although they are often at the forefront of current Australian public discourse, they are more often the object of such speech than the speaking subject. This article examines the extent to which young-adult fiction provides a platform for these authors.'

Source: Abstract.

Books and Blogs : Promoting Reading Achievement in Digital Contexts Kerry-Ann O'Sullivan , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teenagers and Reading : Literary Heritages, Cultural Contexts and Contemporary Reading Practices 2012; (p. 191-209)
Well-Received Muslim Tales Unveil Issues of Racism Fiona Purdon , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 12 - 13 March 2011; (p. 22)
Muslim Teen Heroines in Randa Absel-Fattah's Young Adult Novels Does My Head Look Big in This? and Ten Things I Hate about Me Amy Cummins , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Belief , vol. 30 no. 2 2010; (p. 63-79)
Hyphenated Girls : Australian-Muslim Identity in the Novels of Randa Abdel-Fattah Alice Nuttall , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: IBBYLink , Autumn 2010; (p. 12-14)
Speaking for Ourselves Mike Shuttleworth , Randa Abdel-Fattah , Amra Pajalic , Libby Gleeson , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Newsletter of the Australian Centre for Youth Literature , July no. 2 2009; (p. 8-9)
This column is an edited abstract of the panel discussion 'Growing up Muslim in Australia', which took place at the 2009 Reading Matters conference in Victoria. The panel was chaired by Mike Shuttleworth and consisted of Randa Abdel-Fattah, Amra Pajalic and Libby Gleeson. An audio of the full discussion is available at insideadog.com.au/downloads.
Embodying a Racialised Multiculturalism : Strategic Essentialism and Lived Hybridities in Hoa Pham's No One Like Me Debra Dudek , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 17 no. 2 2007; (p. 43-49)
Debra Dudek is interested in the intersection of multiculturalism, cultural citizenship and children's literature and in this article looks at the 'tension between representing an acceptance of cultural difference...and representing all people within one culture as the same' (43). She locates her analysis within the field of Asian-Australian studies through a discussion of Hoa Pham's No One Like Me (1998), the story of a young Vietnamese girl who lives in Australia with her family, arguing that the text 'simultaneously highlights and deconstructs gender and the Asian family as homogenous categories' (43). Framing the analysis with a discussion of the Howard Government's approach to cultural diversity and its viewpoint that 'immigrants from Asia threaten the notion of a unified Australia', Dudek draws attention to the 'turbulent past and uncertain future' of multiculturalism which, she argues, relies on 'concepts of sameness and difference' that fundamentally support and maintain policies of assimilation (43-44). Dudek posits that No One Like Me negotiates the question of 'how to recognize and accept race and gender strategically as essential categories of difference without homogenising them' (45) in a way which destabilizes 'neat and static categories of otherness' and 'opens up the possibility of multiple subject positions [and] complex lived hybridities' (48).
Middle Eastern Appearance Rosemary Neill , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 23-24 September 2006; (p. 4-6)
Multicultural Stepping Stones Jodie Minus , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , October vol. 1 no. 2 2006; (p. 10)
Jodie Minus looks at the trajectory of Melina Marchetta's career from 'multicultural' to mainstream writer. Minus expresses the hope that Randa Abdel-Fattah will travel a similar path. 'We should look forward to the day', says Minus, 'when Abdel-Fattah no longer writes only about the problems facing Muslims, but about issues faced by all sorts of Australians'.
'They Don't Know Us, What We Are' : An Analysis of Two Young Adult Texts with Arab-Western Protagonists Jo Lampert , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 16 no. 2 2006; (p. 51-57)
This paper argues that since 9/11, the way Arabs are portrayed in Young Adult fiction has become focused on race and ethnic politics in ways that highlight various political agendas fundamentally concerned with 'ethnic loyalties'. Jo Lampert discusses two Young Adult novels, including Australian-born-Muslim, Rhanda Abdel Fattah's text, Does My Head Look Big in This?, by drawing upon postcolonial theories of border crossing and hybridity to look at how representations of Arab-Australian (and Arab-American) identities have shifted since the events of September 11th, 2001. The analysis looks specifically at young Arab-women and how they negotiate questions of identity, positioned as they are in between the 'us and them' dichotomy which underpins racist discourse. The novels discussed are seen to engage with the complexities of Arab-Muslim identity in Western texts by looking at positive ways to embrace mutliple, or hybrid identites.
'Does My Bomb Look Big in This?' : Representing Muslim Girls in Recent Australian Cultural Texts Sharyn Pearce , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 16 no. 2 2006; (p. 58-63)

Pearce looks closely at two recent Australian texts and the specific portrayal of Muslim-Australian girls. She utilizes a postcolonial approach to compare the ways in which the film Marking Time and the novel Does My Head Look Big in This? engage in the racialized politics of Muslim identity.

In terms of the struggle for agency and identity, Pearce argues that Marking Time conforms to an Orientalist paradigm, whereby Muslim identity is represented as mysterious and exotic, providing the site for the white, western male hero's 'rite of passage' (p.59). In contrast, Does My Head Look Big in This? challenges negative stereotypes and notions of 'tolerance' which permeate western representations of Muslim identities and culture, by re-articulating a politics of difference and indicating possibilites for the inscription and articulation of cultural hybridity and multiple subjectivities.

The Shortlist Elizabeth Allen , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Eureka Street , January-February vol. 16 no. 1 2006; (p. 47)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
Untitled Ernie Tucker , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: English in Australia , vol. 41 no. 2 2006; (p. 82-83)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
Bigotry Stripped Bare Jodie Minus , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 6-7 August 2005; (p. 14)
True Blue and Muslim Too Karen Hardy , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 7 September 2005; (p. 3)
Young Adults Lorien Kaye , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 3 September 2005; (p. 6)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
It's a Veiled Subject Cindy Lord , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 30 August 2005; (p. 1)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
Challenges of Teenage Life Stephanie Komesaroff , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Jewish News , 9 September Friday vol. 71 no. 51 2005; (p. 20)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
Veiled Issues Anna Ryan-Punch , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 275 2005; (p. 61-62)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel ; Still Waving Laurene Kelly 2005 single work novel
Young Adults Lorien Kaye , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 3 September 2005; (p. 6)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
It's a Veiled Subject Cindy Lord , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 30 August 2005; (p. 1)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
Challenges of Teenage Life Stephanie Komesaroff , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Jewish News , 9 September Friday vol. 71 no. 51 2005; (p. 20)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
Veiled Issues Anna Ryan-Punch , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 275 2005; (p. 61-62)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel ; Still Waving Laurene Kelly 2005 single work novel
A Head Start in the School of Hard Knocks Nicola Robinson , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12-13 November 2005; (p. 22)

— Review of The Last Anniversary Liane Moriarty 2005 single work novel ; Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
The Shortlist Elizabeth Allen , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Eureka Street , January-February vol. 16 no. 1 2006; (p. 47)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
Untitled Helen Purdie , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking about Books for Children , September vol. 20 no. 4 2005; (p. 40)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
Untitled Sue Clancy , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 49 no. 4 2005; (p. 36-37)

— Review of The Glory Garage : Growing Up Lebanese Muslim in Australia Nadia Jamal Taghred Chandab 2005 selected work non-fiction ; Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
Does My Head Look Big in This? Sam Franzway , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Summer vol. 13 no. 4 2005; (p. 12-13)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
Untitled Ernie Tucker , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: English in Australia , vol. 41 no. 2 2006; (p. 82-83)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
Untitled Neryle Sheldon , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 19 no. 3 2005; (p. 13-14)

— Review of Does My Head Look Big in This? Randa Abdel-Fattah 2005 single work novel
Bigotry Stripped Bare Jodie Minus , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 6-7 August 2005; (p. 14)
True Blue and Muslim Too Karen Hardy , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 7 September 2005; (p. 3)
Middle Eastern Appearance Rosemary Neill , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 23-24 September 2006; (p. 4-6)
Multicultural Stepping Stones Jodie Minus , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , October vol. 1 no. 2 2006; (p. 10)
Jodie Minus looks at the trajectory of Melina Marchetta's career from 'multicultural' to mainstream writer. Minus expresses the hope that Randa Abdel-Fattah will travel a similar path. 'We should look forward to the day', says Minus, 'when Abdel-Fattah no longer writes only about the problems facing Muslims, but about issues faced by all sorts of Australians'.
'They Don't Know Us, What We Are' : An Analysis of Two Young Adult Texts with Arab-Western Protagonists Jo Lampert , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 16 no. 2 2006; (p. 51-57)
This paper argues that since 9/11, the way Arabs are portrayed in Young Adult fiction has become focused on race and ethnic politics in ways that highlight various political agendas fundamentally concerned with 'ethnic loyalties'. Jo Lampert discusses two Young Adult novels, including Australian-born-Muslim, Rhanda Abdel Fattah's text, Does My Head Look Big in This?, by drawing upon postcolonial theories of border crossing and hybridity to look at how representations of Arab-Australian (and Arab-American) identities have shifted since the events of September 11th, 2001. The analysis looks specifically at young Arab-women and how they negotiate questions of identity, positioned as they are in between the 'us and them' dichotomy which underpins racist discourse. The novels discussed are seen to engage with the complexities of Arab-Muslim identity in Western texts by looking at positive ways to embrace mutliple, or hybrid identites.
'Does My Bomb Look Big in This?' : Representing Muslim Girls in Recent Australian Cultural Texts Sharyn Pearce , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 16 no. 2 2006; (p. 58-63)

Pearce looks closely at two recent Australian texts and the specific portrayal of Muslim-Australian girls. She utilizes a postcolonial approach to compare the ways in which the film Marking Time and the novel Does My Head Look Big in This? engage in the racialized politics of Muslim identity.

In terms of the struggle for agency and identity, Pearce argues that Marking Time conforms to an Orientalist paradigm, whereby Muslim identity is represented as mysterious and exotic, providing the site for the white, western male hero's 'rite of passage' (p.59). In contrast, Does My Head Look Big in This? challenges negative stereotypes and notions of 'tolerance' which permeate western representations of Muslim identities and culture, by re-articulating a politics of difference and indicating possibilites for the inscription and articulation of cultural hybridity and multiple subjectivities.

Embodying a Racialised Multiculturalism : Strategic Essentialism and Lived Hybridities in Hoa Pham's No One Like Me Debra Dudek , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 17 no. 2 2007; (p. 43-49)
Debra Dudek is interested in the intersection of multiculturalism, cultural citizenship and children's literature and in this article looks at the 'tension between representing an acceptance of cultural difference...and representing all people within one culture as the same' (43). She locates her analysis within the field of Asian-Australian studies through a discussion of Hoa Pham's No One Like Me (1998), the story of a young Vietnamese girl who lives in Australia with her family, arguing that the text 'simultaneously highlights and deconstructs gender and the Asian family as homogenous categories' (43). Framing the analysis with a discussion of the Howard Government's approach to cultural diversity and its viewpoint that 'immigrants from Asia threaten the notion of a unified Australia', Dudek draws attention to the 'turbulent past and uncertain future' of multiculturalism which, she argues, relies on 'concepts of sameness and difference' that fundamentally support and maintain policies of assimilation (43-44). Dudek posits that No One Like Me negotiates the question of 'how to recognize and accept race and gender strategically as essential categories of difference without homogenising them' (45) in a way which destabilizes 'neat and static categories of otherness' and 'opens up the possibility of multiple subject positions [and] complex lived hybridities' (48).
Speaking for Ourselves Mike Shuttleworth , Randa Abdel-Fattah , Amra Pajalic , Libby Gleeson , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Newsletter of the Australian Centre for Youth Literature , July no. 2 2009; (p. 8-9)
This column is an edited abstract of the panel discussion 'Growing up Muslim in Australia', which took place at the 2009 Reading Matters conference in Victoria. The panel was chaired by Mike Shuttleworth and consisted of Randa Abdel-Fattah, Amra Pajalic and Libby Gleeson. An audio of the full discussion is available at insideadog.com.au/downloads.
Well-Received Muslim Tales Unveil Issues of Racism Fiona Purdon , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 12 - 13 March 2011; (p. 22)
Muslim Teen Heroines in Randa Absel-Fattah's Young Adult Novels Does My Head Look Big in This? and Ten Things I Hate about Me Amy Cummins , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Belief , vol. 30 no. 2 2010; (p. 63-79)
Books and Blogs : Promoting Reading Achievement in Digital Contexts Kerry-Ann O'Sullivan , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teenagers and Reading : Literary Heritages, Cultural Contexts and Contemporary Reading Practices 2012; (p. 191-209)
Hyphenated Girls : Australian-Muslim Identity in the Novels of Randa Abdel-Fattah Alice Nuttall , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: IBBYLink , Autumn 2010; (p. 12-14)
Challenging Stereotypes : Randa Abdel-Fattah's Use of Parody in Does My Head Look Big in This? Colin Hains , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 53 no. 2 2015; (p. 30-35)
'This article explores anti-Muslim stereotypes and strategies for combating them as presented in Randa Abdel-Fattah's first novel for young readers, Does My Head Look Big in This? First published in 2005, in the wake of terrorist attacks in the United States and Bali, the novel focuses on the everyday life of a second-generation Palestinian teenager who decides, as she puts it, to wear the hijab "full time" in a predominantly non-Muslim school in Australia. As will be argued here, stereotypes of Muslims and, in particular, Muslim women present not only challenges for the novel's central protagonist but also sites for her intervention. Central to this discussion is theoretical work by Judith Butler, whose notion of parody emphasizes the destabilizing effect that parody has for otherwise oppressive images and stereotypes. Rather than engage in a patient, rational, and didactic discussion with what are essentially impatient and irrational representations, Does My Head Look Big in This? adopts a strategy of parody-an exaggerated, often funny, redeployment of anti-Muslim stereotypes-in order to expose the ignorance wherein they originate. In this way, it will be argued, the protagonist of Abdel-Fattah's novel is not only "challenged" by anti-Muslim stereotypes, she "challenges back."' (Publication abstract)
Minority Identity and Counter-Discourse: Indigenous Australian and Muslim-Australian Authors in The Young Adult Fiction Market Catriona Mills , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : Special Issue Website Series , October no. 32 2015;

'This article traces the increasing participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander authors and Muslim-Australian authors in the Australian young-adult fiction market. Using bibliographical data drawn from the AustLit database, the article first outlines the general parameters of young-adult publishing in Australia since the 1990s, before specifically examining the works produced by Indigenous Australian and Muslim-Australian authors. These two groups share a significant characteristic: although they are often at the forefront of current Australian public discourse, they are more often the object of such speech than the speaking subject. This article examines the extent to which young-adult fiction provides a platform for these authors.'

Source: Abstract.

Last amended 25 May 2015 13:10:21
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