y The Broken Shore single work   novel   crime  
Issue Details: First known date: 2005 2005
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Joe Cashin was different once. He moved easily then; was surer and less thoughtful. But there are consequences when you've come so close to dying. For Cashin, they included a posting away from the world of Homicide to the quiet place on the coast where he grew up. Now all he has to do is play the country cop and walk the dogs. And sometimes think about how he was before.
Then prominent local Charles Bourgoyne is bashed and left for dead. Everything seems to point to three boys from the nearby Aboriginal community; everyone seems to want it to. But Cashin is unconvinced. And as tragedy unfolds relentlessly into tragedy, he finds himself holding onto something that might be better let go.'
Source: Publisher's website (Sighted 22/8/11)

Adaptations

form y The Broken Shore Andrew Knight , Australia : Australian Broadcasting Corporation Essential Media and Entertainment , 2014 6051658 2014 single work film/TV crime detective

'After a big city detective is posted to a quiet Australian coastal town, a murder of a local philanthropist throws the town into unrest.'

Source: Australian Television Information Archive. (Sighted: 14/6/2013)

Notes

  • Dedication: To Anita: for the laughter and the loyalty.
  • Prequel to Truth.
  • Reading Group Guide available through the Text Publishing website.
  • Selected by the Times, London, as the top crime novel of 2006. (Selection made in 2010 as part of a list nominating the top crime novel for each year of the previous decade.)
  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording, large print.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: De gebroken kust
Language: Dutch
    • Amsterdam,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      De Bezige Bij , 2007 .
      Extent: 446p.
      ISBN: 9789023422037 (pbk.)

Works about this Work

Dead Men Can Talk : Voicing the Dead in Crime Fiction Leanne Dodd , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 35 2016;
'Death is frequently the defining event and consequently an indispensable presence, in most crime fiction narratives. Historically, death in crime fiction is embodied in graphic descriptions of the crime scene and the corpse. In an age of significant advances in technology and unlimited access to information, there has been a shift in the sympathies of readers who want to comprehend not only what death looks like, but also what death feels like through the voice of the victim. Traditionally used as a plot device to initiate the detection and investigation of the crime, the corpse has undergone a resurrection that imposes upon the body its own narrative as a means to explore modern social and cultural anxieties surrounding death. Examining the work of crime writers throughout the history of the genre, this paper investigates the representation of death and the dead body’s changing purpose within the narrative of crime fiction. Various narrative strategies are identified that inform writers how to engage their intended audience in a conversation with the dead. Considering these in conjunction with trauma theory illuminates how crime writers may assuage some of the cultural taboos and anxieties around death while enhancing the appeal of their crime fiction.' (Publication abstract)
What’s Broken in Peter Temple’s The Broken Shore? John West-Sooby , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , March vol. 3 no. 1 2014; (p. 95-104)

'Crime fiction, in its various forms, has produced many remarkable and memorable characters. But beyond the interest we might take in the individual destinies of the protagonists crime novels arouse in us a more fundamental and deep-seated desire: the yearning for order to be reestablished following the scandalous transgression of society’s laws and conventions. Dysfunction and rupture, and the quest for their repair, are thus defining features of the crime genre. In Peter Temple’s 2005 novel The Broken Shore, however, disorder and disruption extend to every facet of society, and are even reflected in the prose itself. By examining the omnipresence of rupture in the novel, this essay seeks to provide a greater appreciation both of Peter Temple’s vision of Australian society and of the originality of his approach to the conventions of crime fiction.' (Publication abstract)

Diary Tom Nairn , 2014 single work column
— Appears in: London Review of Books , 13 December vol. 29 no. 24 2014;
[Untitled] Rachel Franks , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: The Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , March vol. 3 no. 1 2014; (p. 139-143)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
The Case for Peter Temple’s The Broken Shore Stewart King , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: The Conversation , 1 July 2014;

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
ABC Rings in the New for 2013 Greg Hassall , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 3 December 2012; (p. 2)
The Brilliant Foreignness of Australian Crime Fiction B. R. Myers , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Atlantic Monthly , 1 October vol. 308 no. 3 2011; (p. 128-134)

— Review of Truth Peter Temple 2009 single work novel ; The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Book Review – The Broken Shore by Peter Temple Joanne Peulen , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Booklover Book Reviews 2011;

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
No Crime in Choice for Miles Franklin Graeme Blundell , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: the Australian , 24 June 2010; (p. 5)
Poetry and Gore and More : Peter Temple and Australian Crime Fiction Stephen Knight , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Arena Magazine , August-September no. 107 2010; (p. 37-41)
Wanted : A Date with Julia Gillard Jason Steger , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 23 October 2010; (p. 31)
A column canvassing current literary news including a comment on the difficulty of arranging a date for the announcement of the 2010 Prime Minister's Literary Awards. Jason Steger also notes the inclusion of glossaries explaining Australian-isms in the US editions of Peter Temple's novels The Broken Shore and Truth.
Wriitng to His Own Tune Madeline Healy , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 26 - 27 September 2009; (p. 20-21)
Beyond the Sensation Novel : Social Crime Fiction - Qualia of the Real World P. M. Newton , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Sensation 2009; (p. 34-49)

'Charting transformations in sensational writing from the nineteenth century to contemporary crime fiction, Pamela Newton finds in the social crime fiction genre, a realism based on perceptions of "people, place and politics". Newton explores continuities between the exploration and exploitation of the idea of murder in nineteenth-century narrative and in the work of two contemporary novels: Michael Ondaatje's Anil's Ghost and Peter Temple's The Broken Shore.'

Source: 'Introduction' p.xiv

Hoon, coon and boong in Peter Temple's Detective Fiction William Sayers , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 22 no. 2 2008; (p. 165-167)
Traces the origins and meanings of the colloquial words 'hoon', 'coon' and 'boong' and their use in Temple's novel.
Betting on Victorian Dark Horse Well Versed in Dark Deeds Jason Steger , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 30 June 2007; (p. 9)
Australian Writer Wins Crime Prize 2007 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 7 July 2007; (p. 9)
Peter Temple has become the first Australian author to win the world's top prize for crime writing for his novel The Broken Shore.
Crime Pays as Temple Slays Competition to Seize $50,000 Dagger Julia May , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 7-8 July 2007; (p. 25) The Age , 7 July 2007; (p. 5)
Aussie Title Takes UK Crime Prize Deborah Hope , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 7-8 July 2007; (p. 5)
The Broken Shore Wins Duncan Lawrie Dagger 2007 single work column
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , August vol. 87 no. 2 2007; (p. 5)
Brutal Eloquence Patrick Anderson , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Washington Post , 18 June 2007; (p. 3)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Astringent Exploration of the Meaning of Pain Graeme Blundell , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 30-31 July 2005; (p. 15)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Crime File Guy Mosel , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 6 -7 August 2005; (p. 6)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
The Hallmark of Quality Sue Turnbull , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 13 August 2005; (p. 5)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Untitled Tim Coronel , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , August vol. 85 no. 2 2005; (p. 24)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Windswept Backdrop for Aussie Whodunnit Jeff Popple , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 20 August 2005; (p. 13)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Dark Undercurrents Down Deadpan Alley Kerryn Goldsworthy , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20-21 August 2005; (p. 22)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Desparate Crimes Tony Smith , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 274 2005; (p. 51-52)

— Review of The Visitor Jane R. Goodall 2005 single work novel ; Rubdown Leigh Redhead 2005 single work novel ; The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Murder and a Country Town Stephen Dedman , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 10 September 2005; (p. 8)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Around the World in 80 Books : Oceania Robin Wallace-Crabbe , 2005-2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 20 December-10 January vol. 123 no. 6501 2005-2006; (p. 158)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Furniture or Must-Reads? Lucy Sussex , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Summer no. 181 2005; (p. 69-72)

— Review of A Case of Knives Peter Rose 2005 single work novel ; Sing, and Don't Cry : A Mexican Journal Cate Kennedy 2005 single work autobiography ; Grace Robert Drewe 2005 single work novel ; The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel ; After the Party Jesse Kate Blackadder 2005 single work novel
Fiction Giles Hugo , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Island , Autumn no. 104 2006; (p. 34-36)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Summer Crime : Are These Gold Daggers I See Before Me? Peter Guttridge , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Observer , 16 July 2006; (p. 26)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Washed Up 'Tec on a Fatal Shore Marcel Berlins , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Times , 8 July 2006; (p. 14)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Fast Cars, Guns and Babes - Perfect! Mark Timlin , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Independent on Sunday , 25 June 2006;

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Crime and Thrillers Maxim Jakubowski , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian , 17 June 2006;

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Spreading Words With Dinky-Di Determination Carol Middleton , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 21 October 2006; (p. 11)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Brutal Eloquence Patrick Anderson , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Washington Post , 18 June 2007; (p. 3)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Bad Days Down Under Sherryl Connelly , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Daily News , 1 July 2007; (p. 18)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Case of the Warm and Fuzzies Rosemary Sorensen , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , July vol. 2 no. 6 2007; (p. 14-15)

— Review of The Dragon Man Garry Disher 1999 single work novel ; KittyHawk Down Garry Disher 2003 single work novel ; Chain of Evidence Garry Disher 2007 single work novel ; Murray Whelan Mysteries Shane Maloney 1994- series - author novel ; Jack Irish Peter Temple 1996 series - author novel ; The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Crime Marilyn Stasio , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 24 June vol. 112 no. 25 2007; (p. 23)

— Review of The Broken Shore Peter Temple 2005 single work novel
Web of Intrigue as Country Cop Hunts Down a Killer Rob Malinauskas , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 6 August 2005; (p. 43)
Creative Walking Samela Harris , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 27 August 2005; (p. 17)
Such is the Good Life Jason Steger , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 22 July 2006; (p. 29)
Crime Writer Judged a Serial Winner Jason Steger , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 31 August 2006; (p. 6)
Award Ashley Hay , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 24 October vol. 124 no. 6543 2006; (p. 70)
Betting on Victorian Dark Horse Well Versed in Dark Deeds Jason Steger , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 30 June 2007; (p. 9)
Australian Writer Wins Crime Prize 2007 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 7 July 2007; (p. 9)
Peter Temple has become the first Australian author to win the world's top prize for crime writing for his novel The Broken Shore.
Crime Pays as Temple Slays Competition to Seize $50,000 Dagger Julia May , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 7-8 July 2007; (p. 25) The Age , 7 July 2007; (p. 5)
Aussie Title Takes UK Crime Prize Deborah Hope , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 7-8 July 2007; (p. 5)
The Broken Shore Wins Duncan Lawrie Dagger 2007 single work column
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , August vol. 87 no. 2 2007; (p. 5)
Hoon, coon and boong in Peter Temple's Detective Fiction William Sayers , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 22 no. 2 2008; (p. 165-167)
Traces the origins and meanings of the colloquial words 'hoon', 'coon' and 'boong' and their use in Temple's novel.
Wriitng to His Own Tune Madeline Healy , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 26 - 27 September 2009; (p. 20-21)
Beyond the Sensation Novel : Social Crime Fiction - Qualia of the Real World P. M. Newton , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Sensation 2009; (p. 34-49)

'Charting transformations in sensational writing from the nineteenth century to contemporary crime fiction, Pamela Newton finds in the social crime fiction genre, a realism based on perceptions of "people, place and politics". Newton explores continuities between the exploration and exploitation of the idea of murder in nineteenth-century narrative and in the work of two contemporary novels: Michael Ondaatje's Anil's Ghost and Peter Temple's The Broken Shore.'

Source: 'Introduction' p.xiv

No Crime in Choice for Miles Franklin Graeme Blundell , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: the Australian , 24 June 2010; (p. 5)
Poetry and Gore and More : Peter Temple and Australian Crime Fiction Stephen Knight , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Arena Magazine , August-September no. 107 2010; (p. 37-41)
Wanted : A Date with Julia Gillard Jason Steger , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 23 October 2010; (p. 31)
A column canvassing current literary news including a comment on the difficulty of arranging a date for the announcement of the 2010 Prime Minister's Literary Awards. Jason Steger also notes the inclusion of glossaries explaining Australian-isms in the US editions of Peter Temple's novels The Broken Shore and Truth.
ABC Rings in the New for 2013 Greg Hassall , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 3 December 2012; (p. 2)
What’s Broken in Peter Temple’s The Broken Shore? John West-Sooby , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , March vol. 3 no. 1 2014; (p. 95-104)

'Crime fiction, in its various forms, has produced many remarkable and memorable characters. But beyond the interest we might take in the individual destinies of the protagonists crime novels arouse in us a more fundamental and deep-seated desire: the yearning for order to be reestablished following the scandalous transgression of society’s laws and conventions. Dysfunction and rupture, and the quest for their repair, are thus defining features of the crime genre. In Peter Temple’s 2005 novel The Broken Shore, however, disorder and disruption extend to every facet of society, and are even reflected in the prose itself. By examining the omnipresence of rupture in the novel, this essay seeks to provide a greater appreciation both of Peter Temple’s vision of Australian society and of the originality of his approach to the conventions of crime fiction.' (Publication abstract)

Diary Tom Nairn , 2014 single work column
— Appears in: London Review of Books , 13 December vol. 29 no. 24 2014;
Dead Men Can Talk : Voicing the Dead in Crime Fiction Leanne Dodd , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 35 2016;
'Death is frequently the defining event and consequently an indispensable presence, in most crime fiction narratives. Historically, death in crime fiction is embodied in graphic descriptions of the crime scene and the corpse. In an age of significant advances in technology and unlimited access to information, there has been a shift in the sympathies of readers who want to comprehend not only what death looks like, but also what death feels like through the voice of the victim. Traditionally used as a plot device to initiate the detection and investigation of the crime, the corpse has undergone a resurrection that imposes upon the body its own narrative as a means to explore modern social and cultural anxieties surrounding death. Examining the work of crime writers throughout the history of the genre, this paper investigates the representation of death and the dead body’s changing purpose within the narrative of crime fiction. Various narrative strategies are identified that inform writers how to engage their intended audience in a conversation with the dead. Considering these in conjunction with trauma theory illuminates how crime writers may assuage some of the cultural taboos and anxieties around death while enhancing the appeal of their crime fiction.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 23 Jan 2012 16:19:19
Settings:
  • Western District, Victoria,
  • Coast,
  • Melbourne, Victoria,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X