9004895568629356307.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
939162831828705494.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y The Secret River single work   novel   historical fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 2005 2005
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'In 1806 William Thornhill, a man of quick temper and deep feelings, is transported from the slums of London to New South Wales for the term of his natural life. With his wife Sal and their children he arrives in a harsh land he cannot understand.

'But the colony can turn a convict into a free man. Eight years later Thornhill sails up the Hawkesbury to claim a hundred acres for himself.

'Aboriginal people already live on that river. And other recent arrivals - Thomas Blackwood, Smasher Sullivan and Mrs Herring - are finding their own ways to respond to them.

'Thornhill, a man neither better nor worse than most, soon has to make the most difficult choice of his life.

'Inspired by research into her own family history, Kate Grenville vividly creates the reality of settler life, its longings, dangers and dilemmas. The Secret River is a brilliantly written book, a groundbreaking story about identity, belonging and ownership.' (From the publisher's website.)

Adaptations

y The Secret River Andrew Bovell , Strawberry Hills : Currency Press , 2013 Z1887820 2013 single work drama (taught in 2 units)

'Convict William Thornhill, exiled from the stinking slums of early 19th century London, discovers that the penal colony offers something that he never dared to hope for before: a place of his own. A stretch of land on the Hawkesbury River is Thornhill’s for the taking.'

'As he and his family seek to establish themselves in this unfamiliar territory, they find that they are not the only ones to lay a claim to the land. The Hawkesbury is already home to a family of Dharug people, who are reluctant to leave on account of these intruders.'

As Thornhill’s attachment to the place and the dream deepens, he is driven to make a terrible decision that will haunt him for the rest of his life.' (Source: Currency Press website)

form y The Secret River Mac Gudgeon , Jan Sardi , Australia : Ruby Entertainment Australian Broadcasting Corporation , 2015 7504796 2015 series - publisher film/TV historical fiction

'In 1810, emancipated English convict William Thornhill stakes a claim on 100 acres of land on the remote Hawkesbury River in New South Wales, only to find that a clan of Aboriginal people also lay claim to the land, as they have done since time immemorial.' (Production summary)

Notes

  • The Secret River is briefly discussed by John Hirst in Sense & Nonsense in Australian History (2005) pp.84-86 as part of the chapter 'How Sorry Can We Be?'.
  • Featured by the BIG Book Club, an initiative supported by The Advertiser in partnership with Arts SA, The Australia Council for the Arts, Channel 7, FIVEAA and the state's public libraries to promote a love of reading, discussion and literature, July 2006.
  • Dedication: This novel is dedicated to the Aboriginal people of Australia: past, present and future.
  • Prequel to Sarah Thornhill.
  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Text Publishing , 2005 .
      9004895568629356307.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 334p.
      ISBN: 1920885757, 9781922147424
    • Edinburgh,
      c
      Scotland,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Canongate , 2006 .
      Extent: 334p.
      ISBN: 9781841956824 (pbk.), 1841956821 (pbk.)
    • Toronto, Ontario,
      c
      Canada,
      c
      Americas,
      :
      HarperCollins , 2006 .
      Extent: 334p.
      Edition info: 1st Canadian ed.
      ISBN: 0002005980
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Text Publishing , 2015 .
      939162831828705494.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Edition info: Television tie-in edition
      Note/s:
      • Published 27 May 2015.
      ISBN: 781925240061, 9781925240061
Alternative title: De verborgen rivier
Language: Dutch
    • Amsterdam,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Anthos (Netherlands) , 2006 .
      3671650654082234736.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 342p.
      ISBN: 9041410155 9789041410153
    • Amsterdam,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Anthos (Netherlands) , 2007 .
      7869787444096225771.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 342p.
      Edition info: 3rd Dutch ed.
      ISBN: 9789041412034

Works about this Work

Indigenous Writer Bruce Pascoe : 'We Need Novels That Are True to the Land' Monica Tan , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 18 February 2016;
'The writer of mixed Indigenous heritage says rather than books about white or black people, Australia needs great novelists writing truthfully about the land.'
Ethnic Diversity on Australian TV : Are We Finally Ready for Colour on Our Screens? Karl Quinn , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: Brisbane Times , 14 May 2016;
'If you were judging the state of Australian television by last Sunday's Logies, you might reasonably conclude that when it comes to on screen diversity – of the ethnic variety, at least – we're not doing too badly. ...'
y White Apology and Apologia : Australian Novels of Reconciliation Liliana Zavaglia , Amherst : Cambria Press , 2016 10291354 2016 multi chapter work criticism

'This book takes as its subject a body of recent fiction by white liberal writers produced in the wake of the profound cultural, political and legal transformations that have taken place in the field of Indigenous rights since the 1990s. Two milestones of this period are the High Court of Australia’s Mabo ruling on June 3, 1992, and the Rudd Labor Government’s national Apology to Australia’s Indigenous Peoples on February 13, 2008. The novels explored in this study are Alex Miller’s Journey to the Stone Country (2002) and Landscape of Farewell (2007), Andrew McGahan’s The White Earth (2004), Kate Grenville’s The Secret River (2005) and Gail Jones’ Sorry (2007). Each of these novels was written in the period between 2002 and 2007. These were the years when the Indigenous rights and reconciliation movements had all but disappeared from the national political agenda through the interventions of the Howard Liberal Government. These works attempted to counter these silences as acts of literary activism, which strived to reignite the politically stalled processes of reconciliation. Through the medium of fiction, they kept Indigenous justice issues before the reading public, provoking discussion and stirring debate.

'White Apology and Apologia engages in close readings of the Mabo ruling, the national Apology and this body of fiction as a form of cultural history, which reflects important aspects of black/white relations in the past twenty-five years. Together, these legal, political and literary texts reveal a tension that arguably came to define this period. This tension fluctuates between a reconciliatory impulse of sorrow for Indigenous loss and the defensive desire to offer exits for white culture from the ongoing demands of a violent settlement history. Taking shape as twinned register of white longing, this conflicted cultural drive is the focus of this study.

'Each of these novels has had a significant reception and impact. All were shortlisted by the Miles Franklin Award with two taking out the coveted prize. While much critical attention has been given to their fictional explorations of reconciliation and the colonial past, this is the first study to focus on the novels as a collection of cultural artefacts from a brief but remarkable time in Australia’s recent history. In their attempts to explore Indigenous loss and dispossession, the novels can be seen as complex literary engagements with issues of the greatest moment in the contemporary public sphere. Together, they provide a significant snapshot of an ambivalent postcolonial culture in flux.

'Through an exploration of these important documents and texts of reconciliation, this study is able to offer symptomatic close readings of Australian liberal whiteness in the process of coming to terms with its troubling history. Providing new insights into how legal, historical, political, and literary discourses can influence each other in the quest for justice, White Apology and Apologia attempts to understand the relation between Australian literature and the culture that produced it. In the process it reveals the riven state of Australian postcolonial whiteness itself, which has been transformed by the legal, political and cultural shifts of the 1990s, yet which paradoxically resists its own deconstructions even as it longs for the dismantling of its own hegemony. The double movement of apology and apologia explored in this timely and important study is a startling reminder of the unresolved nature of the traumatized colonial legacy bequeathed to Australian settler culture by its history, and which continues to accompany white liberal discourse in its quest to heal its relations with the other.

'White Apology and Apologia is an important book for Australian literary and cultural studies collections.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Telling Stories of Colonial Encounters: Kate Grenville’s The Secret River, The Lieutenant and Sarah Thornhill Annalisa Pes , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Text , vol. 11 no. 2 2016;
'The essay examines the fundamental role of storytelling in the different colonial encounters portrayed by Kate Grenville in her historical-based trilogy: The Secret River (2005), The Lieutenant (2008) and Sarah Thornhill (2011). Starting from Grenville’s assertion that the clash between settlers and Aborigines originated mainly from the “tragic inability to communicate across a gulf of culture,” the essay observes how in the three novels communication and, conversely, incommunicability and miscommunication, both between Europeans (or, later, white Australians) and Indigenous Australians and among Europeans themselves, play a fundamental role in establishing, or failing to establish, relationships and in creating, or in trying to solve, conflicts. The importance of storytelling is investigated in its function of (re)definition of identity and as a necessary step in the process of reconciliation.'
‘Labour against Wilderness’ and the Trouble with Property beyond The Secret River Jennifer Hamilton , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Green Letters : Studies in Ecocriticism , vol. 20 no. 2 2016; (p. 140-155)
'The trouble with wilderness is well known in ecocriticism, less so are the troubles with property. To open an ecocritical path into the property question, this essay reads Kate Grenville’s 2005 novel The Secret River as an allegory about property ownership in contemporary Australia. Grenville describes the protagonist’s claim to property as ‘labour against wilderness’, which invites an investigation into the conceptual correlation between land that is supposedly untouched and that which is ‘owned’. Intersecting with extant postcolonial analyses of the novel, this essay takes up its representation of the labour and violence involved in white settler claims to land in order to develop an anti-colonial and ecological critique of property. In turn, I argue that labour practices oriented towards the acquisition of property actively work against the projects of decolonisation, on the one hand, and multispecies futures, on the other. The closing section of this essay offers some paths out of the wilderness/property double bind by speculating on methods for directing human action towards alternative futures.' (Publication abstract)
TV Takes a Novel Turn Nathanael Cooper , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 10 January 2015; (p. 23)
26 Aussie Books You Must Read Blanche Clark , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 24 January 2015; (p. 18-19)
'With Australia Day upons us...26 great Australian Books that have helped shape and define our nation...'
Force of Nature Greg Callaghan , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 23-24 May 2015; (p. 10-12)
'One moment he’s playing a brutal and depraved ex-convict, the next he’s directing a DreamWorks animation in Hollywood. Meet Tim Minchin, our quiet overachiever. '
Historic River Inn Still Not about to Give up Its Secret Aboriginal History Natasha Robinson , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 13-14 June 2015; (p. 9)
Historical Fiction, Fictional History : Stories We Tell about the Past Camilla Nelson , Christine de Matos , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Writing History 2015; The Conversation , 9 June 2015;
'This introductory article is the first in a new series examining the links, problems and dynamics of writing, recording and recreating history, whether in fiction or non-fiction.'
On the Frontier : The Intriguing Dance of History and Fiction Tom Griffiths , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Writing History 2015; The Conversation , 10 June 2015;
'This article is the second in a series examining the links, problems and dynamics of writing, recording and recreating history, whether in fiction or non-fiction.'
Juxtaposing Australian and Canadian Writing Fiona Polack , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 15 no. 3 2015;

'The geographical entities of Australia and Canada house multifarious localities, regions and nations. Juxtaposing literary work emerging from them can open up invaluable new angles of critical inquiry at a moment when literary scholars in both countries seek insight into the relationship between national literatures and transnational forces.

'Upholding the value of comparing Australian and Canadian literatures is an urgent task at present given that interest in this juxtaposition seems to be diminishing.' (Publication abstract)

Garden Plots Emma Ashmere , 2015 single work essay
— Appears in: Northerly : The Northern Rivers Writers' Centre Magazine , July-August 2015; (p. 12-13)
An overview of Emma Ashmere's favourite gardens in Australian literature.
Stepping Out Luke Slattery , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Monthly , February no. 97 2014; (p. 16-17)
'The article offers author's insights on Australian films. Topics include the tenure of director Andrew Upton on Sydney Theatre Co. (STC), the role of actress Cate Blanchett in "Blue Jasmine," directed by Woody Allen, and the premiere of "Travelling North," directed by David Williamson. Other topics include the success of the film "Waiting for Godot," the filming of the novel "The Secret River," by Kate Grenville, and plaudits for films "Philistines," "The Cherry Orchard," and "Hedda Gabler.' (Publication abstract)
Book Clubs and Reconciliation : A Pilot Study on Book Clubs Reading the ‘Fictions of Reconciliation’ Robert Clarke , Marguerite Nolan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , May no. 56 2014;
Going Against the Flow : The Secret River and Colonialism’s Structuring Oppositions Anouk Lang , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Text , vol. 9 no. 1 2014;

In its retelling of the narrative of colonial settlement in Australia, Kate Grenville’s The Secret River (2005) resonates with debates over Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal relations in contemporary Australia, as its representational strategies can be seen as undermining the kinds of metaphysical oppositions identified by theorists such as Benita Parry, Frantz Fanon and Homi Bhabha as crucial to the structuring of colonialism’s discursive field. The question I take up in this essay is how successful Grenville’s novel is in “repossessing the signifying function appropriated by colonialist representation” that Parry identifies as a necessary, yet insufficient, strategy for laying bare the rhetorical underpinning of the colonial enterprise. How successful is the novel in reconfiguring these signifying relations even as it relies on them to retell a mythic narrative of nation-building? And what does this analytic framework reveal about the blindnesses and omissions of canonical postcolonial criticism with respect to settler-invader contexts? [Author's abstract]

Respecting Protocols for Representing Aboriginal Cultures Jared Thomas , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;
'This essay undertakes a detailed discussion of how respecting protocols for representing Indigenous cultures supports the interests of Indigenous communities and producers of stories with Indigenous content. To highlight the importance of Indigenous protocols I review the prominence and reception of Aboriginal stories in Australian film and literature and discuss how protocol guidelines can prevent problematic representations. I demonstrate how protocols influenced writing Calypso Summer (2014), a novel exploring issues relating to my cultural group, the Nukunu, to illustrate the challenges encountered and benefits gained from employing Indigenous representation protocols. ' (Author's introduction)
Tracking Our Country in Settler Literature Jeanine Leane , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;
'This is a narrative paper that tracks a story of Aboriginal representation and the concept of nation across the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries through some important Australian texts. I read this assemblage of settler literature through the cultural metaphor of tracking, because tracking is as much about anticipation as it is following. Tracking is about reading: reading land and people before and after whitefellas. It is about entering into the consciousness of the person or people of interest. Tracking is not just about reading the physical signs; it is about reading the mind. It is not just about seeing and hearing what is there; it is as much about what is not there. Tony Morrisson wrote of mapping ‘the critical geography’ (3) of the white literary imagination in her work on Africanist presence in American Literature, Playing in the Dark. This paper tracks the settler imagination on Aboriginal presence in Australian literature in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. ' (Author's introduction)
Place and Property in Post-Mabo Fiction by Dorothy Hewett, Alex Miller and Andrew McGahan Kieran Dolin , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;
'Drawing on concepts developed in legal geography and critical histories of property law, this paper considers the connection between legal and affective relations to place in white Australian fiction in the wake of the Mabo decision. In what ways does land ownership, and the rights accorded by property, influence attitudes to and understandings of place? To what extent might the Anglo-Australian law of property be inflected by Indigenous understandings of land and law? Three novels published in the years following the Wik Peoples case are examined, Dorothy Hewett's Neap Tide, Alex Miller's Journey to the Stone Country and Andrew McGahan's The White Earth, due to their overt engagement with post-Mabo law and politics. Through a study of fictional techniques, especially representations of race, space and law, the paper explores whether these novels contribute to the formation of a new understanding of land and justice in contemporary Australia.' (Publication abstract)
Cannibalism and Colonialism : Lilian's Story and (White) Women's Belonging Laura Deane , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;

'In 1985, when Kate Grenville’s novel about a fat, unlovely bag lady appeared on the Australian literary landscape, Lilian’s Story was celebrated as a feminist and postcolonial text. By locating Lilian as ex-centric to the nation, to inhabit the abjected zones of the colony—the bush, the asylum, the streets of post-Federation Sydney—Grenville is commonly read as a feminist writer intervening into the gender politics that shaped Australia. Feminists celebrate the ways in which she carves out discursive spaces for women who have existed largely in the interstices between public memory and official history. Postcolonial critical interpretations of Lilian being ‘colonised’ by her father, provoked by the rape narrative, have tended to reproduce the postcolonial trope of Australia’s shift from a colonial relationship to a national structure. Such readings largely neglect the colonial violence of Australian patriarchy, and the skewed gender norms that result when a host culture is transplanted to an imperial outpost. Taking up the colonial metaphor structuring the relationship between Lilian and her father, I read Lilian’s ‘madness’ as a response to discourses of ‘race’ and gender that circulate in the colonial Imaginary to position women as the site for racial anxiety about colonial ‘dirt’, contamination and disorder. While Lilian approaches the rebellious female grotesque celebrated in postcolonial feminist theorising, her obese body also signifies the devouring nature of colonialism. This paper engages with the white politics of women’s ‘belonging’ inscribed in Lilian’s Story to disinter the schizoid nature of white women’s relationship to colonial patriarchy.' (Publication abstract)

A Challenging Look at the Familiar Territory of Old Australia Stella Clarke , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 25-26 June 2005; (p. 8-9)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
River Reveals Secrets of a Country's Past Diane Stubbings , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 2 July 2005; (p. 12)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
On a River of Dreams Katharine England , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 2 July 2005; (p. 10)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
Original Sins of the Founding Fathers A. P. Riemer , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 2-3 July 2005; (p. 20)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
River of Enchantment Rosemary Sorensen , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 2 - 3 July 2005; (p. 8)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
Tragedy in Black and White Peter Craven , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 9 July 2005; (p. 5)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
Feature Review Fiona Stager , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , July vol. 85 no. 1 2005; (p. 34)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
The Ferryman Pays Barry Oakley , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 19 July vol. 123 no. 6479 2005; (p. 68-69)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
A Room Made of Leaves and Air Kerryn Goldsworthy , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 273 2005; (p. 10-11)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
What Kate Did Next Phil Brown , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Brisbane News , 21 - 27 September no. 557 2005; (p. 10-11)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
Australia Owned Jane Griffiths , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 10 February no. 5367 2006; (p. 23)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
A Life and Dreams Built on Blood Eileen Battersby , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Irish Times , 25 February 2006; (p. 10)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
Strangers in an Even Stranger Land Hugo Barnacle , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Times , 19 February 2006; (p. 55)

— Review of Rifling Paradise Jem Poster 2006 single work novel ; The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
Untitled Ann Penhallurick , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 66 no. 1 2006; (p. 194-197)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
New Narrative, Old Story Richard Scott Carr , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 20 no. 2 2006; (p. 201-202)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
Re-Viewing the Past Rachel Slater , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Women's Book Review , vol. 17 no. 2 2005; (p. 53-54)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
Untitled Anja Schwarz , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Zeitschrift fur Australienstudien , no. 24 2010; (p. 154-159)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
Time for the Timeless Marc McEvoy , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 9 January 2012; (p. 8-9)

— Review of The Vivisector Patrick White 1970 single work novel ; Autumn Laing Alex Miller 2011 single work novel ; The Slap Christos Tsiolkas 2008 single work novel ; Ransom David Malouf 2009 single work novel ; Caleb's Crossing : A Novel Geraldine Brooks 2011 single work novel ; Bereft Chris Womersley 2010 single work novel ; Cloudstreet Tim Winton 1991 single work novel ; That Deadman Dance Kim Scott 2010 single work novel ; The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel ; The Lieutenant Kate Grenville 2008 single work novel ; Sarah Thornhill Kate Grenville 2011 single work novel ; The Ballad of Desmond Kale Roger McDonald 2005 single work novel ; Mr Darwin's Shooter Roger McDonald 1998 single work novel
This Week ou're Reading Natalie Lydia Barker , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 10 November 2012; (p. 29)

— Review of The Secret River Kate Grenville 2005 single work novel
New Frontier Makes Fantastic Fiction Jason Steger , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 14 May 2005; (p. 6)
Skeletons Out of the Closet Jane Sullivan , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Age , 2 July 2005; (p. 1-2)
Kate Grenville's forthcoming novel The Secret River will encourage a fresh debate about frontier violence between local Aboriginal people and European settlers.
Live Their Life Kate Grenville , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 2 - 3 July 2005; (p. 8)
A Woman with a Past Susan Wyndham , 2005 single work biography
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 9-10 July 2005; (p. 20-21)
A Writer's Life : Ideas and Perfection Sally Blakeney , 2005 single work biography
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 12 July vol. 123 no. 6478 2005; (p. 86-88)
Grey Areas Edwina Preston , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Limelight , July 2005; (p. 36-37)
Beauty in a Blank Expression Susan Wyndham , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 16-17 July 2005; (p. 19)
A column canvassing current literary news including a short section about the cover design of Kate Grenville's The Secret River.
When the Past Is Always Present Juliette Hughes , 2005 single work essay
— Appears in: The Age , 13 August 2005; (p. 8)
The Historian Within Kate Grenville , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 13-14 August 2005; (p. 2)
Your View Miriam McGoldrick , 2005 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 20 - 21 August 2005; (p. 2)
Picking Up the Dropped Stitches of Our History Diane Stubbings , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 24 September 2005; (p. 12-13)
Story-Teller Brings History Alive for Readers, and Herself Gia Metherell , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 11 October 2005; (p. 2)
Fetishism Jack Bradstreet , 2005 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , November no. 276 2005; (p. 4)
Breaking Convention Michael Williams , 2005-2006 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December-January no. 277 2005-2006; (p. 6)
A Note from the Author Kate Grenville , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 14 January 2006; (p. 13)
Text Misses the Point Jack Bradstreet , 2006 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , February no. 278 2006; (p. 5)
Havoc in History House Stella Clarke , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 4-5 March 2006; (p. 8-9)
'As professional historians bicker, novelists are staking a claim for the primacy of fictional truth in making sense of the past.' (Editor's headline)
First Person : [Kate Grenville] Kate Grenville , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Guardian , 18 February 2006; (p. 3)
Convict Unbecoming Susan Mansfield , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Scotsman , 4 February 2006; (p. 14)
Comfort History Mark McKenna , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 18-19 March 2006; (p. 15)
In countering Stella Clarke's 'Havoc in History House', McKenna writes that Clarke 'trivialised my [McKenna's] arguments to make it appear as a simple battle between imaginative historical fiction and the noble boredom of "insecure academics" chipping away in the drudgery within "the orthodoxies of salaried history processing".' McKenna states that he has never claimed 'that history should be left to the historians', he is simply trying to 'remind us of the differences between fiction and history, and point to the dangers and consequences of confusing the two.'
Last amended 8 Mar 2016 08:49:31
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