y Dead Europe single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2005 2005
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The novel comprises two separate narratives. The first, told in the style of a fairytale, is set in a traditional Greek peasant village during and after World War II. Its world is still magical. ... The second narrative is set in the present time. The narrator is a 36-year-old gay, Greek-Australian photographic artist named Isaac. We meet Isaac at a time when he has travelled to Greece for what turns out to be a rather dismal officially funded exhibition of his works.'

Source: Manne, Robert. 'Dead Disturbing'. The Monthly. (June, 2005)

Adaptations

form y Dead Europe Louise Fox , Australia : See Saw Films Porchlight Films , 2012 Z1859546 2012 single work film/TV

'Isaac, a Greek Australian in his late 20s, spirals out of control when he's forced to confront his own family's cursed legacy on his first trip to Europe - with the continent's haunted past and troubled present pressing in on him.'

Source: Inside Film website

Notes

  • Dedication: For 'Mitsos' Litras and Dimitris Tsolkas, in gratitude.
  • Epigraph: To a saintly man
    - So goes an Arab tale-
    God said somewhat maliciously:
    'Had I revealed to people
    How great a sinner you are,
    They could not praise you.'
    'And I,' answered the pious one,
    'Had I unveiled to them
    How merciful you are,
    They could not care for you.' (Czeslaw Milosz)

  • The adaptation of Dead Europe began filming in Sydney in September, 2011.
  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Milsons Point, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Vintage , 2005 .
      Extent: 411p.
      ISBN: 1740511948
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Atlantic Books , 2011 .
      Extent: 411p.
      ISBN: 9780857891228 (pbk.), 0857891227 (pbk.)
Alternative title: Ölü avrupa
Language: Turkish
    • Istanbul,
      c
      Turkey,
      c
      Middle East, Asia,
      :
      Versus Kitap , 2007 .
      Extent: 400p.
      ISBN: 9789944989220

Works about this Work

Deaths That Wound : The Traumatic Potential of Ghost Stories Samuel Finegan , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 35 2016;
'Trauma presents any writer with difficulties. Trauma lays outside the realm of representation, by definition something that cannot be expressed and that lies beyond ordinary means of recollection and representation. This article examines the close relationship that exists between trauma and ghost fiction. It highlights the potential ghost fictions, as a form of writing about death, offer writers as translators of historical and social trauma. By reading ghost fiction in tandem with scholarship on trauma fiction and autobiographical trauma writing, the article demonstrates how ghost fiction both prefigures a narrative understanding of memory and history in trauma studies, dramatizes some of the processes and risks of first and second party engagement with trauma and offers a unique opportunity to approach, interrogate and alleviate trauma from the outside. In short, ghost fiction enables creative interventions in social and historical memory not by offering realist ‘precise data’, but by ‘speaking for the ones who did not return’.' (Publication abstract)
Writing Back or Writing off? Europe as “Tribe” and “Traumascape” in Works by Caryl Phillips and Christos Tsiolkas Janine Hauthala , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Postcolonial Writing , vol. 51 no. 2 2015; (p. 208-219)
'This article takes its cue from Caryl Phillips’s critique of Eurocentric “tribalism” in The European Tribe and compares it to the ghostly and highly dystopian “traumascape” of Dead Europe by the Australian writer Christos Tsiolkas. It argues that, in contrast to the predominantly black British frames of reference of Phillips’s counter-travelogue, Tsiolkas’s depiction of Europe is characterized by a transcultural shift. Scrutinizing this shift, the analysis of Tsiolkas’s novel demonstrates how transgressing generic boundaries and employing narrative unreliability and magical realism not only brings transculturality to the fore, but also creates reader complicity. The article goes on to examine the novel’s use of photography, since it plays a crucial role in depicting Europe as “traumascape” and, together with the novel’s unclear stance on anti-Semitism, invites readers to experience the struggle and tensions accompanying diasporic encounters and the emergence of transnational identities in contemporary fictions of Europe.' (Publication abstract)
Subaltern Cosmopolitanism : The Question of Hospitality in Christos Tsiolkas’ Dead Europe Jessica Brooks , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 15 no. 3 2015;
'Christos Tsiolkas’ novel Dead Europe (2005) moves beyond the local to discuss the effects of a globalised neo-imperialism and its implications for Australia. Tsiolkas uses a number of spectral metaphors to emphasise the dehumanisation that is the underside of capitalism and to imply that our present is haunted not only by the injustices of a traumatic historical past but also by the injustice that is to come as a result of today’s aggressive neo-imperialisms. As many have recognised, the novel explores a ‘subaltern’ cosmopolitanism of the marginalised and oppressed. Tsiolkas explores the fact that such subaltern cosmopolitanisms reconfigure our experience of alterity under capitalist globalization, in a manner that necessitates a radical reconsideration of our contemporary ethics. As a result the novel raises many ethical questions regarding the global mistreatment of the migrant and asylum seeker. Read through the lens of Derrida’s later political interrogations, we find that Dead Europe considers the ethics of hospitality—what it means to welcome and receive the ‘other’—and explores the economic violence and racial and religious intolerance that is so often behind violations of hospitality. Key to the novel’s exploration of these issues is Tsiolkas’ use of the spectral metaphor of the dead Jewish boy, Elias, who acts as a symbol for the cultural, political, and economic forces that lead to violations of hospitality.' (Publication abstract)
Take a Walk in Their Shoes : Empathy and Emotion in the Writing Process Enza Gandolfo , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Text : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , April vol. 18 no. 1 2014;
'Christos Tsiolkas said Dead Europe ‘was a very difficult novel to write. It ... took me, in the writing of it, into dark and fearful places. As a writer you take on aspects of your characters and if you are not careful the world you are creating begins to blend with the world you actually inhabit’ (Tsiolkas 2008). There is substantial research demonstrating the therapeutic benefits of writing about one’s own traumas. But what are the challenges of writing fiction that requires imagining and creating traumatic events; evil, monstrous or tragic characters? If, as many argue, fiction makes readers more empathetic, it is because writers have created believable worlds that readers can inhabit. In order to create believable worlds that readers can inhabit these worlds and the characters that people them, writers have to inhabit their characters’ lives. This can mean spending years in very dark places. In this article I explore the emotional and physical impact this has on writers and look at ways writers might manage what Marguerite MacRobert calls the ‘emotional roller coaster’ (MacRobert 2012). This is an autoethnographic article and my aim is to contribute to our understanding of the processes of creative writing by exploring and interrogating my experience of writing fiction about traumatic experiences.' (Publication summary)
Christos Tsiolkas and the Ghosts of Our Past Heather Taylor Johnson (interviewer), 2014 single work interview
— Appears in: Writers in Conversation , August vol. 1 no. 2 2014;
'With the arrival of his first novel in 1995, Loaded, Christos Tsiolkas became a voice for a new generation of Australians. The book’s main character, Ari – later made into the flesh by actor Alex Dimitriades in the film adaptation Head On – represented a young, gay Greek Australian man, angered by classism and racism to the point of self-destruction, and confused with his place in the world that surrounds him. This character would be reborn in many other men in Tsiolkas’ books, as would these themes become the crux of his work. His other novels include The Jesus Man (1999), Dead Europe (2005; winner of The Age Book of the Year), The Slap (2008; winner of the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Award, longlisted for the Man Booker Prize and adapted into an award winning mini-series) and his latest book Barracuda (2013). He is a multi-talented writer with an autobiography and book of essays to add to his collection, as well as ‘playwright’ and ‘screenwriter’ to add to his list of titles. Often referred to by literary critics as our most controversial writer, Christos Tsiolkas lays bare what it means to be Australian, and in this interview I revisit what for me is his most controversial book, Dead Europe.' (Introduction)
Me and My Country, Where to Now? Heather Taylor Johnson (interviewer), 2013 single work interview
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 72 no. 1 2013; (p. 178-188)

In a wide-ranging interview, Tsiolkas discusses film and television adaptations of his work, critical reception of his work, his politics, the role of sex in his books, and what the description of his books as 'controversial' might mean.

Dead Europe and the Coming of Age in Australian Literature : Globalisation, Cosmopolitanism and Perversity Lynda Ng , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , May no. 54 2013;
The Politics of Desire: A Freudian Reading of Christos Tsiolkas’s Dead Europe Jean-François Vernay , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association of Studies on Australia, , vol. 3 no. 2 2012; (p. 80-89)
'This article articulates a psychoanalytic reading of Christos Tsiolkas's Dead Europe by analysing desire in relation to Melanie Klein's oral sadistic stage, a desire which, in the author's grim fairytale with Gothic-laden aesthetics, is metaphorically expressed through vampirism and cannibalism.' (Author's abstract)
Queering the Mainstream : The Slap and 'Middle' Australia Mandy Treagus , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 3 2012;

'On the publication of The Slap, Christos Tsiolkas has become a major figure in the literary life of Australia and beyond. This article examines whether this novel continues the concerns of his earlier fiction, especially those of his first novel Loaded, or whether, in style, content and characterisation, it abandons what many would see as a predominantly queer literary and political project in favour of addressing the concerns of mostly middle-class and straight inner-suburban Melburnians. It questions whether the shift in themes and characters has been the reason the book has gathered so much more attention than his previous works. Does the novel overtly address the so-called 'mainstream'? And if it does, is there a corresponding shift away from Tsiolkas's previous concerns? I argue that while it does appear to occupy more middle ground, the novel in fact performs a queering of that space, not only via inclusive characterisation but also via narrative and literary technique. In doing so, Tsiolkas enacts a profound ethics of inclusion that has ramifications for conceptions of the Australian nation.' (Author's abstract)

Europe and its ‘Ends’. Haunting (by) the Past in Christos Tsiolkas’ Dead Europe Marilena Parlati , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 2 no. 2 2011; (p. 42-52)
'This paper aims at attempting an analysis, by force partial, of white Europe as such a metaphor in the light of recent critical work on whiteness within a European context. Quite obviously, the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 strongly impacted upon the numerous and often conflicting discourses related to the construction and reconstruction of global and European identities which followed that momentuous event; I refer here to the lacunar mythical roots Luisa Passerini finds in the idea of Europe itself (2002), to the shadows of the Shoah, but also to studies of European post-socialism in its unpredictable and still underrated connections with post-colonialism and the aftermath (and vampiric debris) of the Cold War.' Marilena Parlati.
Tsiolkas Gets a Slap for Bad Sex Matt Buchanan , Scott Ellis , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 23 November 2011; (p. 22)
'Christos Tsiolkas has been nominated for the second year running in the Bad Sex in Fiction awards.'
The Joy of Bad Sex Involves Lepidopterists, a Cyclops and Kathy Lette Paul Sheehan , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 24 November 2011; (p. 17)
"There Were Phantoms" : Spectral Shadows in Christos Tsiolkas' Dead Europe' Liz Shek-Noble , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 11 no. 2 2011;
'Central to Karl Abraham and Maria Torok's metapsychological account of the Phantom is the prima facie assumption that the dead return to haunt the living because there is a debt which must be paid to them, the corollary of which, according to Slavoj Zizek, is that 'they were not properly buried' (qtd. in Davis 2). In this essay, I explore the problematics surrounding the proper (re)burial of the dead in Christos Tsiolkas' Dead Europe, whereby unearthing shameful ancestral secrets Isaac Raftis dislodges and ultimately 'exorcises' the Phantom which haunts his family line. In exploring how Isaac becomes a living repository of an( )other's trauma, that is, the trauma of Elias who was killed by Isaac's grandparents, Dead Europe exemplifies the impossibility for the living subject to divorce him/herself from the collectivity of shadows and spectres forming one's past.' (Author's abstract)
'What's Haunting Dead Europe?' Trauma Fiction as a Reaction to Postmodern Governmentality Michael Vaughan , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 11 no. 2 2011;
'The ghosts of Christos Tsiolkas' Dead Europe have been a key focus of its critical reception. This article offers an alternative reading of these ghosts, arguing that Tsiolkas writes trauma fiction to challenge the totalising discourse of postmodern governmentality, to assert the impossibility of an end to history, and to write fiction which haunts its readers to enact an ethical relationship with the traumatic past.' (Author's abstract)
A Novel Approach to Religion Paul Mitchell , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , March vol. 69 no. 1 2010; (p. 89-98)
Discusses religious themes and aspects in some recent Australian fiction.
Christos Tsiolkas and the Pornographic Logic of Commodity Capitalism Andrew McCann , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 25 no. 1 2010; (p. 31-41)
Putting Tsiolkas's works into a wider context of international writing, the essay is concerned with 'the fictional tradition that either deploys the pornographic, or evokes what might be called a pornographic sensibilty, in order to articulate forms of political and aesthetic radicality' (32).
Discrepant Cosmopolitanism and the Contemporary Novel : Reading the Inhuman in Christos Tsiolkas's Dead Europe and Robert Bolano's 2666 Andrew McCann , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 24 no. 2 2010; (p. 135-141)
‘When James Clifford coined the phrase ‘Discrepant cosmopolitanisms,’ he had in mind the ‘cultures of displacement and transplantation that are inseparable from specific, often violent, histories of economic, political, and cultural interaction” (108). Because these histories of interaction are frequently the same ones that, at least indirectly, underpin the cosmopolitan freedom and prosperity of affluent metropolitan centers, the study of discrepant cosmopolitanism s often involves an understanding of how different sites in the global economy are related to each other. As Michael Davidson puts it, a bit more bluntly than Clifford, ‘the cosmopolitanism produced through globalization yokes together the elite and the abject, the globe trotting business man or the wealthy tourist, as well as the migrant labourer, sex worker, and political exile’ (735). In this essay I want to think about how contemporary fiction encounters this issue…’ (Author’s introduction p. 135)
Work in Progress : Multicultural Writing in Australia Wenche Ommundsen , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 243-257)
On the Cusp : Radical Ethics and the Figure of the Boy in Christos Tsiolkas’ Dead Europe and The Slap Neena Balwan Sachdev , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Double Dialogues , no. 12 2010;
'The two novels, Dead Europe and The Slap, are filled with the ‘smells and expressions of the male body (Tsiolkas 2008:1). Christos Tsiolkas bombards readers with representations of the male and, in Dead Europe particularly, with the figure of the young boy. Nine pages of the novel are devoted to a depiction of the young Isaac who, from the ages of 13 to 16 has two ‘affairs’ with much older men. This paper analyses this brief section critically in the light of the older Isaac’s continued fascination with young boys. In The Slap the awkward 18-year-old Richie is linked with both the four-year-old Hugo and the 43-year-old Hector. Through a consideration of Germaine Greer’s The Boy, Emmanuel Lévinas’ notions of infinity and the Face of the Other and Christos Tsiolkas’ essay on tolerance in Tsiolkas, Haigh and Wright’s Tolerance, Prejudice and Fear, this exploratory essay will question the representation of the boy in Tsiolkas’ two novels. It will argue that Tsiolkas, by his own definition a “radical artist”, is fascinated by the ethical and that both novels are examinations of the ethical in the abject. What is the radical ethics implicit in these two novels?' (Author's abstract)
The View From Here : Readers and Australian Literature Lydia Wevers , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2009;
Unsettled By Europe's Dark Wasteland Natasha Cica , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 28-29 May 2005; (p. 8-9)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas 2005 single work novel
A Taste of European Decay Ian Syson , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 28 May 2005; (p. 4)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas 2005 single work novel
Dead Disturbing Robert Manne , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Monthly , June no. 2 2005; (p. 50-53)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas 2005 single work novel
Old World Order Sally Blakeney , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 14 June vol. 123 no. 6474 2005; (p. 68-69)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas 2005 single work novel
A Very Modern Ghost Story Michael Williams , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June-July no. 272 2005; (p. 45)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas 2005 single work novel
Cursed Culture Ben Harrison , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 11 - 12 June 2005; (p. 10)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas 2005 single work novel
Blasphemous, Disturbing and Brilliant Sara Dowse , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 18 June 2005; (p. 13)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas 2005 single work novel
Journey Through Cursed Lands David Marr , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 25-26 June 2005; (p. 20)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas 2005 single work novel
Old World Yields To Modern Woes Clara Iaccarino , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 3 July 2005; (p. 58)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas 2005 single work novel
Untitled Geoff Parkes , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: API Review of Books , August no. 36 2005;

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas 2005 single work novel
Europe Lost in Transition Anne Partlon , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 19 November 2005; (p. 12)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas 2005 single work novel
Sex, Lies and Antisemitism in Aussie Novel Dawn Cohen , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Jewish News , 16 December vol. 72 no. 12 2005; (p. 22)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas 2005 single work novel
Untitled Gillian Dooley , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Adelaide Review , 19 August - 1 September no. 275 2005; (p. 19)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas 2005 single work novel
Review of Christos Tsiolkas, Dead Europe Humphrey McQueen , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Politics and Culture , no. 4 2005;

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas 2005 single work novel
European Vocation Sacha Molitorisz , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 18-19 June 2005; (p. 22-23)
Wrestling Demons Paul Lloyd , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 18 June 2005; (p. 11)
A Fortunate Son Richard Watts , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 3 July 2005; (p. 20)
The Year's Work in Fiction Kerryn Goldsworthy , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 50 no. 2005; (p. 56-67)
Shortlisted books for the 2004-2005 Miles Franklin Literary Award.
The Spectres Haunting Dead Europe Andrew McCann , Christen Cornell , Jeff Sparrow , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Overland , Summer no. 181 2005; (p. 26-31)
Politics, Faith and Sex Patricia Cornelius (interviewer), 2005 single work interview
— Appears in: Overland , Summer no. 181 2005; (p. 18-25)
When the Past Isn't Past : A Role for Fiction in Australia's History Wars James Ley , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 19 May no. 5381 2006; (p. 23)
Discusses the extent to which contemporary Australian literature is preoccipied with the past.
Haunted by Europe's Demons Jason Steger , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 26 August 2006; (p. 27)
Poet of the Political Takes Age Book of the Year Prize Jason Steger , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 26 August 2006; (p. 2)
$60,000 Consolation for Writer's Concern Jason Steger , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 16 November 2006; (p. 8)
Tales of Terror Hit Hard Giorgios Hatzimanolis , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Neos Kosmos , 14 August 2006;
'Giorgios Hatzimanolis speaks to performer Kostantinos Tsetonis about his collaboration with author Christos Tsiolkas.'
'Blood and Land and Ghosts' : Haunting Words in Christos Tsiolkas's Dead Europe Catherine Padmore , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2007; (p. 52-64)

Catherine Padmore's article seeks to understand the 'spectral effect' of Dead Europe. She explores 'two (out of many possible) main ideas, both of which involve a form of literary possession. These are:
1. The strategic use of the ghost story form to produce uncanny effects;
and
2. The lingering and difficult question of whether or not this novel is anti-Semitic.' (p.53)

Padmore concludes: 'Dead Europe can disturb readers on a number of levels. It uses traditional ghost story techniques and encourages reader identification with a confronting character to create a compelling literary possession not simply between characters within the book but between book and reader. In this way it provokes, but does not answer, multiple questions. Lodged in me, the novel's ghosts continue to provoke, unsettle and disturb, long after reading has finished.' (p.62)

Vampires, Again Graham Huggan , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 66 no. 3 2006; (p. 192-204)
Specters of Berlin in A. L. McCann's Subtopia and Christo Tsioklas's Dead Europe David Sornig , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 21 no. 1 2007; (p. 67-71)

David Sornig explores the idea that Andrew McCann's Subtopia and Christos Tsiolkas's Dead Europe render 'versions of Berlin, and engage the narrative uncertainty of the fall of the Berlin Wall in a way that can be read to follow from Derrida's exploration of the logic of the ghost, the hauntology he describes in Specters of Marx, which suggests that the presence of the past should be interrogated not as a final post-Historical object, as Fukuyama [in The End of History and The Last Man] might suggest, but rather as this heterogeneous inheritance, as multiple as its iterations'.

Sornig discusses the ways in which McCann's and Tsiolkas's narratives 'weigh the eschatological status of Berlin'.

'Are you weaker than a woman, weaker even than a mother?' : Abjection and Infanticide in Dead Europe and Drift Jacinta Van Den Berg , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 23 no. 2 2007; (p. 230-244)
'Will This be Your Poem, or Mine?' : The Give and Take of Story Noel Rowe , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 23 no. 2 2007; (p. 1-14) Ethical Investigations : Essays on Australian Literature and Poetics 2008; (p. 13-29)
Gardening in Hell: Abject Presence and Sublime Present in Dead Europe and The Vintner's Luck Laura Joseph , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2008; (p. 105-113)

'In two recent Australian and New Zealand novels, Christos Tsiolkas' Dead Europe (2005) and Elizabeth Knox's The Vintner's Luck (1999) respectively, Europe is cast as hell according to the matter of abjection and the temporality of the sublime. As Kristeva theorises this relationship, "the abject is edged with the sublime. It is not the same moment on the journey, but the same subject and speech bring them into being." (1982:11) This essay investigates these two moments arguing that the irruption of the abject or shock of the sublime also enacts a temporal disturbance. In Dead Europe and The Vintner's Luck, the immanence of the abject and sublime is figured according to an insistence on embodiment, propelled by homoerotic and perverse desires and haunted by an irreducible otherness. This essay takes up the theme of ASAL 2007 "the colonial present" in its consideration of temporality and substance - the present, and presence - in these two novels that flesh out queer spaces within individual and national identity.

'These two texts, individually, but perhaps more potently in their conversation, figure queerness as the becoming and undoing of the subject, the locus of a necessary impossibility and a queer opposition to the logic of opposition.

'This essay analyses The Vintner's Luck, and Dead Europe in order to show, via the rhetorical operations of queerness, how the dark matter of literature, by seeping into impossible spaces, opens up new possibilities.' (Author's abstract)

Double Gazing and Novel Spaces - Examining Narrated and Manifest Photographs in the Novel Peter Davis , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Double Dialogues , Winter no. 7 2007;
Future Tense : Dead Europe and Viral Anti-Semitism Catherine Padmore , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 23 no. 4 2008; (p. 434-445)
The article examines the ways in which anti-Semitism functions in Tsiolka's novel and whether it perpetuates or interrogates racism. 'Discussions of Tsiolka's motivations for writing the novel are central to this, as are studies of its narrative voice, character and plot development' (434).
Interview with Christos Tsiolkas : 'What Does Fiction Do?' : On Dead Europe: Ethics and Aesthetics Catherine Padmore (interviewer), 2008 single work interview
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 23 no. 4 2008; (p. 446-462)
Last amended 6 Jan 2015 11:48:03
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