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Issue Details: First known date: 1999 1999
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Why Weren't We Told? is a frank account of Henry Reynolds' personal journal towards the realisation that he, like generations of Australians, grew up with a distorted and idealised version of the past. From the author's unforgettable encounter in a North Queensland jail with injustice towards Aboriginal children, to his friendship with Eddie Mabo, to his shattering of the myths about our 'peaceful' history, this bestselling book will shock, move and intrigue. Why Weren't We Told? is crucial reading on the most important debate in Australia as we enter the twenty-first century.

Notes

  • Explores the social conditions and treatment of Aboriginal Australians.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Viking , 1999 .
      3563990467992349555.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: vii, 264p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Includes index.
      ISBN: 0670887412
    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2000 .
      Extent: xv, 264pp.
      Note/s:
      • Includes index: p. 259-264.
      ISBN: 0140278427

Works about this Work

Why Didn’t You Listen : White Noise and Black History Mitchell Rolls , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Aboriginal History , vol. 34 no. 2010; (p. 11-33)
'The review and analysis of Why Weren't We Told? an international bestseller written by Henry Reynolds is discussed. The book highlights the author's personal reflection elaborating his awakening encounter with a manifestation of Australian race relations.' Source: Mitchell Rolls.
y Witnessing Australian Stories : History, Testimony and Memory in Contemporary Culture Kelly Jean Butler , Melbourne : 2010 6037495 2010 single work thesis

'This book is about how Australians have responded to stories about suffering and injustice in Australia, presented in a range of public media, including literature, history, films, and television. Those who have responded are both ordinary and prominent Australians–politicians, writers, and scholars. All have sought to come to terms with Australia's history by responding empathetically to stories of its marginalized citizens.

'Drawing upon international scholarship on collective memory, public history, testimony, and witnessing, this book represents a cultural history of contemporary Australia. It examines the forms of witnessing that dominated Australian public culture at the turn of the millennium. Since the late 1980s, witnessing has developed in Australia in response to the increasingly audible voices of indigenous peoples, migrants, and more recently, asylum seekers. As these voices became public, they posed a challenge not only to scholars and politicians, but also, most importantly, to ordinary citizens.

'When former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd delivered his historic apology to Australia's indigenous peoples in February 2008, he performed an act of collective witnessing that affirmed the testimony and experiences of Aboriginal Australians. The phenomenon of witnessing became crucial, not only to the recognition and reparation of past injustices, but to efforts to create a more cosmopolitan Australia in the present. This is a vital addition to Transactions critically acclaimed Memory and Narrative series.' (Publisher's blurb)

Becoming Migloo Gillian Whitlock , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Ideas Market : An Alternative Take on Australia's Intellectual Life 2004; (p. 236-258)
Shelf Life Jason Steger , 2000 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 28 October 2000; (p. 8)
Shelf Life Jason Steger , 2000 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 28 October 2000; (p. 8)
Becoming Migloo Gillian Whitlock , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Ideas Market : An Alternative Take on Australia's Intellectual Life 2004; (p. 236-258)
Why Didn’t You Listen : White Noise and Black History Mitchell Rolls , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Aboriginal History , vol. 34 no. 2010; (p. 11-33)
'The review and analysis of Why Weren't We Told? an international bestseller written by Henry Reynolds is discussed. The book highlights the author's personal reflection elaborating his awakening encounter with a manifestation of Australian race relations.' Source: Mitchell Rolls.
y Witnessing Australian Stories : History, Testimony and Memory in Contemporary Culture Kelly Jean Butler , Melbourne : 2010 6037495 2010 single work thesis

'This book is about how Australians have responded to stories about suffering and injustice in Australia, presented in a range of public media, including literature, history, films, and television. Those who have responded are both ordinary and prominent Australians–politicians, writers, and scholars. All have sought to come to terms with Australia's history by responding empathetically to stories of its marginalized citizens.

'Drawing upon international scholarship on collective memory, public history, testimony, and witnessing, this book represents a cultural history of contemporary Australia. It examines the forms of witnessing that dominated Australian public culture at the turn of the millennium. Since the late 1980s, witnessing has developed in Australia in response to the increasingly audible voices of indigenous peoples, migrants, and more recently, asylum seekers. As these voices became public, they posed a challenge not only to scholars and politicians, but also, most importantly, to ordinary citizens.

'When former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd delivered his historic apology to Australia's indigenous peoples in February 2008, he performed an act of collective witnessing that affirmed the testimony and experiences of Aboriginal Australians. The phenomenon of witnessing became crucial, not only to the recognition and reparation of past injustices, but to efforts to create a more cosmopolitan Australia in the present. This is a vital addition to Transactions critically acclaimed Memory and Narrative series.' (Publisher's blurb)

Last amended 12 Jan 2016 11:20:52
Subjects:
  • North Queensland, Queensland,
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