y Here's Luck single work   novel   humour  
Issue Details: First known date: 1930 1930
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Notes

  • Broadcast on ABC Radio National in 1993 as a serial, read by Max Gillies.
  • Other formats: Also sound recording, e-book.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Literary Vaudeville : Lennie Lower’s Comic Journalism Peter Kirkpatrick , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 16 no. 1 2016;
'It is entirely possible that vaudeville never really died—at least not in Australia. Susan Lever, for one, has observed that vaudeville-style, self-consciously performative ‘characters’ have had a surprising afterlife in Australian culture. Against the scarcity of successful home-grown sitcoms, she notes the preference of local audiences for revue-style sketch comedy, as well as ‘character’-based variety shows centred upon such diverse comic figures as Graham Kennedy, Norman Gunston (Garry McDonald), and Roy and HG (John Doyle and Greig Pickhaver)—to which might be added Paul Hogan and Shaun Micallef. Even Jane Turner and Gina Riley’s caricatural Kath & Kim suggests that ‘the Australian taste for comedy remains firmly on the side of vaudeville’ (238).' (Introduction)
We Are But Dust, Add Water and We Are Mud': The Comic Language of Here's Luck Peter Kirkpatrick , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Serious Frolic : Essays on Australian Humour 2009; (p. 97-109)
y Lennie Lower : He Made a Nation Laugh Bill Hornadge , Pymble : Angus and Robertson , 1993 Z467511 1993 single work biography
Cranky Jacks : Men Without Women in Steele Rudd's 'On Our Selection' and Lennie Lower's 'Here's Luck' P. D. Edwards , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reconnoitres : Essays in Australian Literature in Honour of G. A. Wilkes 1992; (p. 79-90)
Edwards examines the similarities between Rudd's Cranky Jack and Lower's Jack Gudgeon, concluding that, while the destruction committed by both characters indirectly affects womenfolk through their menfolk, only Jack Gudgeon is conscious of this. Despite the chaos produced by the men in these stories, women are able to maintain domestic stability, reflecting negatively on the behaviour and character of the men.
The Latest in Paperbacks Graham Clark , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 3 June 1989; (p. 7)

— Review of Hook's Mountain James McQueen 1982 single work novel ; Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
A Darlinghurst Don Quixote Herb Hild , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 28 May 1989; (p. 20)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
New Paperbacks Robin Lucas , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 11 March 1989; (p. 87)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
Paperbacks Robin Lucas , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 11 March 1989; (p. 15)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
The Latest in Paperbacks Graham Clark , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 4 March 1989; (p. 7)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
Lower Me Down Barry Dickins , 1986 single work biography
— Appears in: Meanjin , Winter vol. 45 no. 2 1986; (p. 207-211)
The Sphinx at the Tavern Table Keith Willey , 1984 single work criticism
— Appears in: You Might As Well Laugh, Mate: Australian humour in hard times 1984; (p. 42-57)
Willey compares Lennie Lower with the Czechoslovakian humourist, Jaroslav Hasek, to assist his description of the tormented life that produced two novels and a stream of humorous sketches in the 1930s and 1940s. Willey argues that "Lower's genius rested in his ability to ignore the elaborate political and puritanical superstructure which overlaid and ostensibly gave direction to events, and delve instead into the rich and chaotic human life of the underlying infrastructure of his society".
Here's Luck i "Lennie Lower (sadly missed)", H. St.P. Scarlett , 1983 single work poetry satire
— Appears in: Oz Shrink Lit. 1983; (p. 45)
'Here's Luck' and Lower Ronald McCuaig , 1955 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 29 June vol. 76 no. 3933 1955; (p. 2)
An Australian Humourist 1930 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 30 May 1930; (p. 8)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
'Here's Luck' 1930 single work review
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 10 July 1930; (p. 64)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
Untitled Franziska , 1930 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Woman's Mirror , 15 July vol. 6 no. 34 1930; (p. 24)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
The reviewer praises Lower's narrative skill and describes him as 'one of Australia's brightest humourists'.
A Sydney Realist John Dalley , 1930 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 11 June vol. 51 no. 2626 1930; (p. 2-5)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
An Australian Humourist 1930 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 30 May 1930; (p. 8)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
'Here's Luck' 1930 single work review
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 10 July 1930; (p. 64)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
Untitled Franziska , 1930 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Woman's Mirror , 15 July vol. 6 no. 34 1930; (p. 24)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
The reviewer praises Lower's narrative skill and describes him as 'one of Australia's brightest humourists'.
The Latest in Paperbacks Graham Clark , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 3 June 1989; (p. 7)

— Review of Hook's Mountain James McQueen 1982 single work novel ; Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
A Sydney Realist John Dalley , 1930 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 11 June vol. 51 no. 2626 1930; (p. 2-5)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
A Darlinghurst Don Quixote Herb Hild , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 28 May 1989; (p. 20)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
New Paperbacks Robin Lucas , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 11 March 1989; (p. 87)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
Paperbacks Robin Lucas , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 11 March 1989; (p. 15)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
The Latest in Paperbacks Graham Clark , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 4 March 1989; (p. 7)

— Review of Here's Luck Lennie Lower 1930 single work novel
We Are But Dust, Add Water and We Are Mud': The Comic Language of Here's Luck Peter Kirkpatrick , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Serious Frolic : Essays on Australian Humour 2009; (p. 97-109)
Cranky Jacks : Men Without Women in Steele Rudd's 'On Our Selection' and Lennie Lower's 'Here's Luck' P. D. Edwards , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reconnoitres : Essays in Australian Literature in Honour of G. A. Wilkes 1992; (p. 79-90)
Edwards examines the similarities between Rudd's Cranky Jack and Lower's Jack Gudgeon, concluding that, while the destruction committed by both characters indirectly affects womenfolk through their menfolk, only Jack Gudgeon is conscious of this. Despite the chaos produced by the men in these stories, women are able to maintain domestic stability, reflecting negatively on the behaviour and character of the men.
Lower Me Down Barry Dickins , 1986 single work biography
— Appears in: Meanjin , Winter vol. 45 no. 2 1986; (p. 207-211)
'Here's Luck' and Lower Ronald McCuaig , 1955 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 29 June vol. 76 no. 3933 1955; (p. 2)
Here's Luck i "Lennie Lower (sadly missed)", H. St.P. Scarlett , 1983 single work poetry satire
— Appears in: Oz Shrink Lit. 1983; (p. 45)
y Lennie Lower : He Made a Nation Laugh Bill Hornadge , Pymble : Angus and Robertson , 1993 Z467511 1993 single work biography
The Sphinx at the Tavern Table Keith Willey , 1984 single work criticism
— Appears in: You Might As Well Laugh, Mate: Australian humour in hard times 1984; (p. 42-57)
Willey compares Lennie Lower with the Czechoslovakian humourist, Jaroslav Hasek, to assist his description of the tormented life that produced two novels and a stream of humorous sketches in the 1930s and 1940s. Willey argues that "Lower's genius rested in his ability to ignore the elaborate political and puritanical superstructure which overlaid and ostensibly gave direction to events, and delve instead into the rich and chaotic human life of the underlying infrastructure of his society".
Literary Vaudeville : Lennie Lower’s Comic Journalism Peter Kirkpatrick , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 16 no. 1 2016;
'It is entirely possible that vaudeville never really died—at least not in Australia. Susan Lever, for one, has observed that vaudeville-style, self-consciously performative ‘characters’ have had a surprising afterlife in Australian culture. Against the scarcity of successful home-grown sitcoms, she notes the preference of local audiences for revue-style sketch comedy, as well as ‘character’-based variety shows centred upon such diverse comic figures as Graham Kennedy, Norman Gunston (Garry McDonald), and Roy and HG (John Doyle and Greig Pickhaver)—to which might be added Paul Hogan and Shaun Micallef. Even Jane Turner and Gina Riley’s caricatural Kath & Kim suggests that ‘the Australian taste for comedy remains firmly on the side of vaudeville’ (238).' (Introduction)
Last amended 1 Apr 2014 11:29:25
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