y Settler Romances and the Australian Girl multi chapter work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2004 2004
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Incisive readings of popular late 19th and early 20th century settler adventure romance unmask a deep-seated anxiety about the stability of concepts of whiteness and femininity in colonial Australia.In the acknowledgements, the author lists three of her earlier articles which first outlined key elements of the argument presented in this work.

Notes

  • Dedication: For my parents.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Crawley, Inner Perth, Perth, Western Australia,: UWA Publishing , 2004 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Introduction : Encountering Fictive Europeans, Tanya Dalziell , 2004 single work criticism (p. 1-23, notes 139-143)
Ethnographic Desires and Fugitive Anne : A Romance of the Unexplored Bush, Tanya Dalziell , 2004 single work criticism (p. 25-50, notes 144-146)
Haunted Economies : J. D. Hennessey's An Australian Bush Track and the 'Native' Gift, Tanya Dalziell , 2004 single work criticism (p. 51-73, notes 146-149)
Unsettling Sympathetic Women : Katharine Langloh Parker and Catherine Martin's An Australian Girl, Tanya Dalziell , 2004 single work criticism (p. 74-105, notes 149-156)
Colonial Displacements : My Brilliant Career, A Comedy in Spasms and The Penance of Portia James, Tanya Dalziell , 2004 single work criticism (p. 106-131, notes 156-158)
In Conclusion, Tanya Dalziell , 2004 single work criticism (p. 132-138, notes 158-159)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Cosmos Magazine and Colonial Femininity Rachael Weaver , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'This article looks at the relatively short and colourful life of Sydney's Cosmos: An Illustrated Australian Magazine—one of the many ephemeral literary magazines that flourished briefly during the colonial era in Australia, and which have been largely forgotten today. From its beginning in September 1894, Cosmos published poetry, short fiction, book reviews, and literary criticism, aiming to offer readers something 'that was purely Australian' as well as providing an important venue for the writings of popular colonial authors such as Louise Mack, Edward Dyson, Ernest Favenc, and many others. This article argues the Cosmos magazine was deeply invested in the development of a distinctively Australian literary culture and that an important focus for accomplishing this was its exploration of metropolitan modes of colonial femininity.'
Negotiating the Colonial Australian Popular Fiction Archive Ken Gelder , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-12)
'There is an identifiable 'archive' of colonial Australian popular fiction consisting of romance, adventure fiction, Gothic fiction, crime fiction, Lemurian fantasy and a significant number of related subgenres (bushranger fiction, convict romance, Pacific or 'South Sea' adventure, tropical romance, 'lost explorer' stories, and so on). Looking at this archive soon reveals both its sheer size and range, and the fact that so little of it is remembered today. Rachael Weaver, Ailie Smith and I have begun to build a digital archive of colonial Australian popular fiction with the primary aim of making this material available to an interested reading public, as well as to scholars specialising in colonial Australian (and transnational) literary studies. At the time of writing we are really only about 20% complete with around 500 authors represented on the site, although many with only a fraction of their work uploaded and with only the bare bones of a scholarly apparatus around them: a few short biographical notes, a bibliography, and the texts themselves: first editions in most cases.' (Author's introduction, p. 1)
Eliza Hamilton Dunlop's 'The Aboriginal Mother' : Romanticism, Anti Slavery and Imperial Feminism in the Nineteenth Century Katrina Hansord , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-12)
'This paper positions the work of colonial poet Eliza Hamilton Dunlop amongst international Romantic poetry of the period, and argues that Dunlop's poetry reflects a transposition of Romantic women's poetry to Australia. Dunlop's poetry, such as 'The Aboriginal Mother', demonstrates the relationship of Romantic women's poetry to early feminism and Social Reform. As with the work of Felicia Hemans, Dunlop was interested in the role of women, and the 'domestic' as they related to broader national and political concerns. Dunlop seems to have been consciously applying the tropes, such as that of the mother, of anti slavery poetry found within American, British, and international poetic traditions to the Australian aboriginal context. Themes of indigenous motherhood, and also of Sati or widow burning in India, and human rights had been favored by early women's rights campaigners in Britain from the 1820s, focusing on abolition of slavery through the identification of white women with the Negro mother. Dunlop's comparative sympathy for the situation of aboriginals in Australia has been given critical attention as the aspect which makes her work valuable. However, in this essay I hope to outline how Dunlop's poetry fits in to the international context of the engagement of Romantic women poets with Western Imperialist models and colonial Others.' (Author's abstract)
Settler Post-Colonialism and Australian Literary Culture Anna Johnston , Alan Lawson , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 28-40)
'This essay begins by mapping the place of settler postcolonialism in postcolonial studies, and its relevance to the Australian context. It then moves to demonstrate the applicability of settler postcolonial reading practices for Australian texts and contexts through two paradigmatic tropes: land and textuality.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)
Untitled 2007-2008 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies , vol. 10 no. 2 2007-2008; (p. 90)

— Review of Settler Romances and the Australian Girl Tanya Dalziell 2004 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled Susan Sheridan , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 5 2006; (p. 227-229)

— Review of Settler Romances and the Australian Girl Tanya Dalziell 2004 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled Anna Garretson , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: JAS Review of Books , March no. 31 2005;

— Review of Settler Romances and the Australian Girl Tanya Dalziell 2004 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled Margaret Allen , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , October vol. 36 no. 126 2005; (p. 365-366)

— Review of Settler Romances and the Australian Girl Tanya Dalziell 2004 multi chapter work criticism
Internationalising Australian Studies : Non-Fiction 2004 - 2005 Robert Dixon , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 50 no. 2005; (p. 128-143)
Argues a need for Australian literary studies and Australian studies in general to move beyond the national paradign that was a necessary part of their original disciplinary formation.
Untitled Anna Garretson , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: JAS Review of Books , March no. 31 2005;

— Review of Settler Romances and the Australian Girl Tanya Dalziell 2004 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled Margaret Allen , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , October vol. 36 no. 126 2005; (p. 365-366)

— Review of Settler Romances and the Australian Girl Tanya Dalziell 2004 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled Susan Sheridan , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 5 2006; (p. 227-229)

— Review of Settler Romances and the Australian Girl Tanya Dalziell 2004 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled 2007-2008 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies , vol. 10 no. 2 2007-2008; (p. 90)

— Review of Settler Romances and the Australian Girl Tanya Dalziell 2004 multi chapter work criticism
Internationalising Australian Studies : Non-Fiction 2004 - 2005 Robert Dixon , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 50 no. 2005; (p. 128-143)
Argues a need for Australian literary studies and Australian studies in general to move beyond the national paradign that was a necessary part of their original disciplinary formation.
Settler Post-Colonialism and Australian Literary Culture Anna Johnston , Alan Lawson , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 28-40)
'This essay begins by mapping the place of settler postcolonialism in postcolonial studies, and its relevance to the Australian context. It then moves to demonstrate the applicability of settler postcolonial reading practices for Australian texts and contexts through two paradigmatic tropes: land and textuality.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)
Negotiating the Colonial Australian Popular Fiction Archive Ken Gelder , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-12)
'There is an identifiable 'archive' of colonial Australian popular fiction consisting of romance, adventure fiction, Gothic fiction, crime fiction, Lemurian fantasy and a significant number of related subgenres (bushranger fiction, convict romance, Pacific or 'South Sea' adventure, tropical romance, 'lost explorer' stories, and so on). Looking at this archive soon reveals both its sheer size and range, and the fact that so little of it is remembered today. Rachael Weaver, Ailie Smith and I have begun to build a digital archive of colonial Australian popular fiction with the primary aim of making this material available to an interested reading public, as well as to scholars specialising in colonial Australian (and transnational) literary studies. At the time of writing we are really only about 20% complete with around 500 authors represented on the site, although many with only a fraction of their work uploaded and with only the bare bones of a scholarly apparatus around them: a few short biographical notes, a bibliography, and the texts themselves: first editions in most cases.' (Author's introduction, p. 1)
Eliza Hamilton Dunlop's 'The Aboriginal Mother' : Romanticism, Anti Slavery and Imperial Feminism in the Nineteenth Century Katrina Hansord , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-12)
'This paper positions the work of colonial poet Eliza Hamilton Dunlop amongst international Romantic poetry of the period, and argues that Dunlop's poetry reflects a transposition of Romantic women's poetry to Australia. Dunlop's poetry, such as 'The Aboriginal Mother', demonstrates the relationship of Romantic women's poetry to early feminism and Social Reform. As with the work of Felicia Hemans, Dunlop was interested in the role of women, and the 'domestic' as they related to broader national and political concerns. Dunlop seems to have been consciously applying the tropes, such as that of the mother, of anti slavery poetry found within American, British, and international poetic traditions to the Australian aboriginal context. Themes of indigenous motherhood, and also of Sati or widow burning in India, and human rights had been favored by early women's rights campaigners in Britain from the 1820s, focusing on abolition of slavery through the identification of white women with the Negro mother. Dunlop's comparative sympathy for the situation of aboriginals in Australia has been given critical attention as the aspect which makes her work valuable. However, in this essay I hope to outline how Dunlop's poetry fits in to the international context of the engagement of Romantic women poets with Western Imperialist models and colonial Others.' (Author's abstract)
Cosmos Magazine and Colonial Femininity Rachael Weaver , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'This article looks at the relatively short and colourful life of Sydney's Cosmos: An Illustrated Australian Magazine—one of the many ephemeral literary magazines that flourished briefly during the colonial era in Australia, and which have been largely forgotten today. From its beginning in September 1894, Cosmos published poetry, short fiction, book reviews, and literary criticism, aiming to offer readers something 'that was purely Australian' as well as providing an important venue for the writings of popular colonial authors such as Louise Mack, Edward Dyson, Ernest Favenc, and many others. This article argues the Cosmos magazine was deeply invested in the development of a distinctively Australian literary culture and that an important focus for accomplishing this was its exploration of metropolitan modes of colonial femininity.'
Last amended 8 Jul 2005 16:33:36
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