Issue Details: First known date: 2004 2004
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The publication of collaborative Indigenous life writing places both the text and its production under public scrutiny. The same is true for the criticism of life writing. For each, publication has consequences. Taking as its starting point the recent critical concern for harm occasioned in life writing, this article argues that in the reading of collaborative Indigenous life writing, injury may eventuate from the commentary itself .... With particular regard to the collaborative texts Ingelba and the Five Black Matriarchs and [the Canadian work] Stolen Life: The Journey of a Cree Woman, this article argues that literary criticism can benefit from the practice of consultation with the Indigenous subjects whose representations it comments upon.' (p.55)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

'Whiteness' and 'Aboriginality' in Canada and Australia Lynette Russell , Margery Fee , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Feminist Theory , August vol. 8 no. 2 2007; (p. 187-208)
'We ... begin our conversation with each other and with you by examining our personal relationship to the idea of whiteness in order to reveal some of its complexity in Canada and Australia. 'Whiteness' as an abstraction has proved useful in moving the invisible norm to visibility, but we show who an awareness of 'whiteness' in two locations can be recuperated to re-privilege the already privileged. Aboriginal speakers and writers that theorized 'whiteness', in many cases from outside the academy, in the process 'hybridizing' traditional genres. For many of them, Aboriginality, like whiteness, is a construct that often stands in the way of thinking clearly about where to go next in the fight against racism' (187).
'Whiteness' and 'Aboriginality' in Canada and Australia Lynette Russell , Margery Fee , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Feminist Theory , August vol. 8 no. 2 2007; (p. 187-208)
'We ... begin our conversation with each other and with you by examining our personal relationship to the idea of whiteness in order to reveal some of its complexity in Canada and Australia. 'Whiteness' as an abstraction has proved useful in moving the invisible norm to visibility, but we show who an awareness of 'whiteness' in two locations can be recuperated to re-privilege the already privileged. Aboriginal speakers and writers that theorized 'whiteness', in many cases from outside the academy, in the process 'hybridizing' traditional genres. For many of them, Aboriginality, like whiteness, is a construct that often stands in the way of thinking clearly about where to go next in the fight against racism' (187).
Last amended 10 Dec 2008 15:40:52
X