y Homebush Boy : A Memoir single work   autobiography  
Issue Details: First known date: 1995 1995
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Notes

  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Port Melbourne, South Melbourne - Port Melbourne area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Heinemann , 1995 .
      Extent: 180p.
      ISBN: 0855616555
    • Port Melbourne, South Melbourne - Port Melbourne area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Minerva , 1995 .
      Extent: 180p.
      Reprinted: 1996
      ISBN: 1863305025
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Sceptre , ca. 1995 .
      Extent: 180p.
      ISBN: 0340647280

Works about this Work

A National (Diasporic?) Living Treasure : Thomas Keneally Paul Sharrad , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Le Simplegadi , November no. 14 2015; (p. 20-27)
Although Thomas Keneally is firmly located as a national figure, his international literary career and his novels’ inspection of colonial exile, Aboriginal alienation, and movements of people throughout history reflect aspects of diasporic experience, while pushing the term itself into wider meaning of the transnational.
Traduit de l’américain : Thomas Keneally and the Mechanics of an International Career David Carter , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Book History , vol. 16 no. 2013; (p. 364-386)

'Internationally, Thomas Keneally is one of Australia’s most successful authors, whether in terms of critical reception, book sales, or author profile. He is probably best known as the author of Schindler’s List from 1982—Schindler’s Ark in Britain and Australasia—even if his fame in this regard has been somewhat obscured by Stephen Spielberg’s multi-Oscar-winning movie of 1993. The story of how Keneally came to write this book and its subsequent success is one of the more remarkable episodes in Australian book history, and of course it is by no means confined to Australia, its point of origin only in a very qualified sense. Published simultaneously in London, New York, and Sydney, Schindler’s List appeared in at least eight different English-language and fourteen foreign-language editions even before the release of Spielberg’s movie. It won the Booker Prize for 1982, the first by an Australian novelist, although Keneally had already been short-listed for the award on three occasions. Across the Atlantic, it was one of the New York Times ’ Best Books of 1982, and in the following year the winner of the Los Angeles Times Fiction Prize. The movie’s success meant new English and American editions together with a dozen or so translations in 1994 alone, including Turkish, Japanese, Chinese, and Catalan versions. New Czech and Marathi editions appeared as recently as 2009.' (Author's introduction)

y Contesting Childhood : Autobiography, Trauma, and Memory Kate Douglas , New Brunswick : Rutgers University Press , 2010 Z1836606 2010 single work criticism 'The late 1990s and early 2000s witnessed a surge in the publication and popularity of autobiographical writings about childhood. Linking literary and cultural studies, Contesting Childhood draws on a varied selection of works from a diverse range of authors - from first-time to experienced writers. Kate Douglas explores Australian accounts of the Stolen Generation, contemporary American and British narratives of abuse, the bestselling memoirs of Andrea Ashworth, Augusten Burroughs, Robert Drewe, Mary Karr, Frank McCourt, Dave Pelzer, and Lorna Sage, among many others." "Drawing on trauma and memory studies and theories of authorship and readership, Contesting Childhood offers commentary on the triumphs, trials, and tribulations that have shaped this genre. Douglas examines the content of the narratives and the limits of their representations, as well as some of the ways in which autobiographies of youth have become politically important and influential. This study enables readers to discover how stories configure childhood within cultural memory and the public sphere.' (Publisher's blurb)
Young and Restless, and Reliving the Experience John Morrow , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 14 January 1996; (p. 8)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography ; Mudeye : An Australian Boyhood and Beyond Bary Dowling 1995 single work autobiography
Green Salad Days Gerard Windsor , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Eureka Street , January-February vol. 6 no. 1 1996; (p. 46-47)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography
Keneally Teams Up Aesthetics and Athletics Robert Hefner , 1995 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 15 October 1995; (p. 22)
Memoirs of Keneally, the Failed Hand Holder Tony Stephens , 1995 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12 October 1995; (p. 3)
Growing Up Catholic Rosemary Sorensen , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 21 October 1995; (p. wkd 7)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography
Keneally at His Best Helen Elliott , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 28 October 1995; (p. C11)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography
Conscience Wrestling Tim Bowden , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 4-5 November 1995; (p. rev 9)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography
In the Beginning Were the Words Edmund Campion , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 14 November vol. 116 no. 5996 1995; (p. 96)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography
Untitled Thomas Shapcott , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , October vol. 75 no. 1063 1995; (p. 32-33)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography
Keneally's Toe in the Water? Thomas Shapcott , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December-January (1995-1996) no. 178 1995; (p. 13-14)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography
Retracing the Gentle Steps of Youth John Hanrahan , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 30 December 1995; (p. 6)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography ; Mudeye : An Australian Boyhood and Beyond Bary Dowling 1995 single work autobiography
Growing Up Catholic Rosemary Sorensen , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 21 October 1995; (p. wkd 7)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography
Keneally at His Best Helen Elliott , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 28 October 1995; (p. C11)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography
Conscience Wrestling Tim Bowden , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 4-5 November 1995; (p. rev 9)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography
In the Beginning Were the Words Edmund Campion , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 14 November vol. 116 no. 5996 1995; (p. 96)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography
Untitled Thomas Shapcott , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , October vol. 75 no. 1063 1995; (p. 32-33)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography
Keneally's Toe in the Water? Thomas Shapcott , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December-January (1995-1996) no. 178 1995; (p. 13-14)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography
Retracing the Gentle Steps of Youth John Hanrahan , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 30 December 1995; (p. 6)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography ; Mudeye : An Australian Boyhood and Beyond Bary Dowling 1995 single work autobiography
Young and Restless, and Reliving the Experience John Morrow , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 14 January 1996; (p. 8)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography ; Mudeye : An Australian Boyhood and Beyond Bary Dowling 1995 single work autobiography
Green Salad Days Gerard Windsor , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Eureka Street , January-February vol. 6 no. 1 1996; (p. 46-47)

— Review of Homebush Boy : A Memoir Thomas Keneally 1995 single work autobiography
y Contesting Childhood : Autobiography, Trauma, and Memory Kate Douglas , New Brunswick : Rutgers University Press , 2010 Z1836606 2010 single work criticism 'The late 1990s and early 2000s witnessed a surge in the publication and popularity of autobiographical writings about childhood. Linking literary and cultural studies, Contesting Childhood draws on a varied selection of works from a diverse range of authors - from first-time to experienced writers. Kate Douglas explores Australian accounts of the Stolen Generation, contemporary American and British narratives of abuse, the bestselling memoirs of Andrea Ashworth, Augusten Burroughs, Robert Drewe, Mary Karr, Frank McCourt, Dave Pelzer, and Lorna Sage, among many others." "Drawing on trauma and memory studies and theories of authorship and readership, Contesting Childhood offers commentary on the triumphs, trials, and tribulations that have shaped this genre. Douglas examines the content of the narratives and the limits of their representations, as well as some of the ways in which autobiographies of youth have become politically important and influential. This study enables readers to discover how stories configure childhood within cultural memory and the public sphere.' (Publisher's blurb)
Keneally Teams Up Aesthetics and Athletics Robert Hefner , 1995 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 15 October 1995; (p. 22)
Memoirs of Keneally, the Failed Hand Holder Tony Stephens , 1995 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12 October 1995; (p. 3)
Traduit de l’américain : Thomas Keneally and the Mechanics of an International Career David Carter , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Book History , vol. 16 no. 2013; (p. 364-386)

'Internationally, Thomas Keneally is one of Australia’s most successful authors, whether in terms of critical reception, book sales, or author profile. He is probably best known as the author of Schindler’s List from 1982—Schindler’s Ark in Britain and Australasia—even if his fame in this regard has been somewhat obscured by Stephen Spielberg’s multi-Oscar-winning movie of 1993. The story of how Keneally came to write this book and its subsequent success is one of the more remarkable episodes in Australian book history, and of course it is by no means confined to Australia, its point of origin only in a very qualified sense. Published simultaneously in London, New York, and Sydney, Schindler’s List appeared in at least eight different English-language and fourteen foreign-language editions even before the release of Spielberg’s movie. It won the Booker Prize for 1982, the first by an Australian novelist, although Keneally had already been short-listed for the award on three occasions. Across the Atlantic, it was one of the New York Times ’ Best Books of 1982, and in the following year the winner of the Los Angeles Times Fiction Prize. The movie’s success meant new English and American editions together with a dozen or so translations in 1994 alone, including Turkish, Japanese, Chinese, and Catalan versions. New Czech and Marathi editions appeared as recently as 2009.' (Author's introduction)

A National (Diasporic?) Living Treasure : Thomas Keneally Paul Sharrad , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Le Simplegadi , November no. 14 2015; (p. 20-27)
Although Thomas Keneally is firmly located as a national figure, his international literary career and his novels’ inspection of colonial exile, Aboriginal alienation, and movements of people throughout history reflect aspects of diasporic experience, while pushing the term itself into wider meaning of the transnational.
Last amended 20 Sep 2012 09:35:39
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