7305451879437031616.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
5193455472314718625.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y Lizzie Nonsense single work   picture book   children's   historical fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 2004... 2004
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Her mother calls it nonsense when Lizzie pretends that their house is pretty or that a bath is the sea, but it turns out that imagination runs in the family.

Notes

  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Surry Hills, Inner Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: Little Hare Books , 2004 .
      7305451879437031616.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: [32] p.p.
      Description: col. illus.
      Note/s:
      • Published : August 15th 2005
      ISBN: 187700359X
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Clarion Books , 2005 .
      5193455472314718625.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 32p.
      ISBN: 061857493X, col. illus.
Alternative title: 愛做夢的莉茲
Transliterated title: Ai zuo meng de Lizi
Language: Chinese

Works about this Work

What Are We Feeding Our Children When We Read Them a Book? Depictions of Mothers and Food in Contemporary Australian Picture Books Laurel Cohn , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mothers and Food : Negotiating Foodways from Maternal Perspectives 2016; (p. 232-244)

'This chapter explores how Australian writers and illustrators in the twenty-first century depict the act of mothering in picture books for young children in relation to cooking and serving food. It draws on the idea that children’s texts can be understood as sites of cultural production and reproduction, with social conventions and ideologies embedded in their narrative representations. The analysis is based on a survey of 124 books that were shortlisted for, or won, Children’s Book Council of Australia awards between 2001 and 2013. Of the eighty-seven titles that contain food and have human or anthropomorphised characters, twenty-six (30 percent) contain textual or illustrative references to maternal figures involved in food preparation or provision. Examination of this data set reveals that there is a strong correlation between non-Anglo-Australian maternal figures and home-cooked meals, and a clear link between Anglo-Australian mothers and sugar-rich snacks. The relative paucity of depictions of ethnically unmarked mothers offering more nutritious foods is notable given the cultural expectations of mothers as caretakers of their children’s well-being. At the same time, the linking of non-Anglo-Australian mothers with home-cooked meals can be seen as a means of signifying a cultural authenticity, a closeness to the earth that is differentiated from the normalised Australian culture represented in picture books. This suggests an unintended alignment of mothers preparing and serving meals with “otherness,” which creates a distancing effect between meals that may generally be considered nutritious and the normalised self. I contend there are unexamined, and perhaps unexpected, cultural assumptions about ethnicity, motherhood, and food embedded in contemporary Australian picture books. These have the potential to inscribe a system of beliefs about gender, cultural identity, and food that contributes to readers’ understanding of the world and themselves.'

Source: Abstract.

Mapping Australia's Past in Picture Books Robin Morrow , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 47 no. 2 2009; (p. 18-26)
"This paper examines four influential Australian picture books that provide narratives from different perspectives, representing the white men's (and especially military) history, white women's (settler) history, Aboriginal history (from traditional life to colonial and then post-colonial), and finally everybody's history, especially giving a voice to children". - Paper abstract
And Now for a Well Known Female Writer Robin Morrow , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May 2008 vol. 52 no. 2 2008; (p. 12-13)
A Vision Splendid Stephanie Owen Reeder , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 273 2005; (p. 61)
Untitled H. M. Saxby , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 48 no. 4 2004; (p. 15)

— Review of Lizzie Nonsense Jan Ormerod 2004 single work picture book
Shorts: Children's Books Christopher Bantick , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 18 September 2004; (p. 20)

— Review of The Mighty Bunyips Paul Harvey 2004 single work picture book ; By the River Steven Herrick 2004 single work novel ; Our School Fete Louise Pfanner 2004 single work picture book ; Forest Sonya Hartnett 2001 single work novel ; Lizzie Nonsense Jan Ormerod 2004 single work picture book ; A Roomful of Magic John Marsden 2004 single work children's fiction
Bookshelf Katharine England , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 9 October 2004; (p. 9)

— Review of Wings Carol Chataway 2004 single work picture book ; Lizzie Nonsense Jan Ormerod 2004 single work picture book ; Fergal Onions John Harrison 2004 single work picture book
Animals, Boats and Shacks Sherryl Clark , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 265 2004; (p. 61-62)

— Review of Yardil Rosanne Hawke 2004 single work picture book ; Lizzie Nonsense Jan Ormerod 2004 single work picture book ; Refugees David Miller 2003 single work picture book ; The Call of the Osprey Norman Jorgensen 2004 single work picture book ; The Shack that Dad Built Elaine Russell 2004 single work picture book
Untitled H. M. Saxby , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 48 no. 4 2004; (p. 15)

— Review of Lizzie Nonsense Jan Ormerod 2004 single work picture book
A Look at Jan Ormerod's Lizzie Nonsense Alison Gregg , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 19 no. 4 2004; (p. 4-6)
A Vision Splendid Stephanie Owen Reeder , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 273 2005; (p. 61)
And Now for a Well Known Female Writer Robin Morrow , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May 2008 vol. 52 no. 2 2008; (p. 12-13)
Mapping Australia's Past in Picture Books Robin Morrow , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 47 no. 2 2009; (p. 18-26)
"This paper examines four influential Australian picture books that provide narratives from different perspectives, representing the white men's (and especially military) history, white women's (settler) history, Aboriginal history (from traditional life to colonial and then post-colonial), and finally everybody's history, especially giving a voice to children". - Paper abstract
What Are We Feeding Our Children When We Read Them a Book? Depictions of Mothers and Food in Contemporary Australian Picture Books Laurel Cohn , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mothers and Food : Negotiating Foodways from Maternal Perspectives 2016; (p. 232-244)

'This chapter explores how Australian writers and illustrators in the twenty-first century depict the act of mothering in picture books for young children in relation to cooking and serving food. It draws on the idea that children’s texts can be understood as sites of cultural production and reproduction, with social conventions and ideologies embedded in their narrative representations. The analysis is based on a survey of 124 books that were shortlisted for, or won, Children’s Book Council of Australia awards between 2001 and 2013. Of the eighty-seven titles that contain food and have human or anthropomorphised characters, twenty-six (30 percent) contain textual or illustrative references to maternal figures involved in food preparation or provision. Examination of this data set reveals that there is a strong correlation between non-Anglo-Australian maternal figures and home-cooked meals, and a clear link between Anglo-Australian mothers and sugar-rich snacks. The relative paucity of depictions of ethnically unmarked mothers offering more nutritious foods is notable given the cultural expectations of mothers as caretakers of their children’s well-being. At the same time, the linking of non-Anglo-Australian mothers with home-cooked meals can be seen as a means of signifying a cultural authenticity, a closeness to the earth that is differentiated from the normalised Australian culture represented in picture books. This suggests an unintended alignment of mothers preparing and serving meals with “otherness,” which creates a distancing effect between meals that may generally be considered nutritious and the normalised self. I contend there are unexamined, and perhaps unexpected, cultural assumptions about ethnicity, motherhood, and food embedded in contemporary Australian picture books. These have the potential to inscribe a system of beliefs about gender, cultural identity, and food that contributes to readers’ understanding of the world and themselves.'

Source: Abstract.

Last amended 23 Jan 2015 10:17:54
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