Resurrecting Ned Kelly single work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2003 2003
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'In a review of Peter Carey's True History of the Kelly Gang, the poet Peter Porter commented that the three most potent icons in Australian popular history were Ned Kelly, Phar Lap, and Donald Bradman. Of these Ned Kelly has the longest history, and has undergone numerous revivals and reconfigurations. One might also argue that he was the least successful of the three; he was a man who saw himself as a victim of empire, class, race, and the judicial system. At least that is how Kelly presents himself in The Jerilderie Letter, and many of those who have written about him affirm that this view was justified. So the question is why and in what ways Ned Kelly has become so potent; why cannot Australians let him die? And what does he mean to Australians, or indeed the rest of the world, today? This essay will glance briefly at some early representations of Kelly, before discussing in more detail Peter Carey's revival of Kelly, and considering the significance of that revival in the present.' (Author's abstract)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Sydney Studies in English vol. 29 2003 Z1137927 2003 periodical issue 2003 pg. 69-78
  • Appears in:
    y The AustLit Anthology of Criticism Leigh Dale , Linda Hale , St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2010 Z1679436 2010 anthology criticism The articles collected here have been selected with non-specialist readers in mind and aim to provide insights and valuable understandings into the works of important Australian writers. Upper secondary and lower tertiary students and general readers will find these articles useful for the study of leading Australian writers whether that is happening in years 11 and 12; first, second and third year university courses; or reading groups. St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2010 pg. 5
Last amended 6 May 2015 14:43:22
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