y Tressa's Resolve single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1872 1872
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Serialised by: The Sydney Mail 1860-1938 newspaper (1427 issues)
      1872 .
      Note/s:
      • Serialised in the Sydney Mail, 31 August 1872 - 7 December 1872.
      • 'by the late Mrs Calvert'
    • Canberra, Australian Capital Territory,: Mulini Press , 2004 .
      Extent: 1v.p.
      Note/s:
      • Book launched at the Louisa Atkinson Celebration, Mt Tomah Botanic Gardens on 28 November 2004.

Works about this Work

James Calvert, Louisa Atkinson and the Plains of Promise : The Story Behind Louisa Atkinson's Last Novel Patricia Clarke , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Margin , April no. 77 2009; (p. 20-34)

Patricia Clarke argues that the Queensland scenes of Louisa Atkinson's novel Tressa's Resolve are 'clearly based on her husband's [James Calvert's] recollections of the harsh nature of the country he travelled over during his historic fifteen months journey to Port Essington [with Ludwig Leichhardt in 1844-45] and on his scepticism of the grandiose plans for settlement, particularly of the district that was deceptively named 'The Plains of Promise'.' (28)

Writing from the Contact Zone : Fiction by Early Queensland Women Belinda McKay , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 30 no. 2 2004; (p. 53-70) Hibiscus and Ti-Tree : Women in Queensland 2009; (p. 30-45)
This paper examines 'some of the ways in which white women novelists also contributed powerfully to shaping the literary imaginative landscape through which Australian readers came to "know" Indigenous people, and the nature of inter-racial contact, in the period before the publication of writing by Indigenous women began to disrupt the textual terrain' (54). The focus is on the writing of women who grew up in rural Queensland and/or used Queensland as settings. The paper concludes that women writers, though presenting themselves as sympathetic and knowledgeable observers and spokespersons for Indigenous people, were 'active participants in the ongoing colonial projects of subjugating Indigenous people and managing perceptions of that process' (68).
'The One Jarring Note' : Race and Gender in Queensland Women's Writing to 1939 Belinda McKay , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland Review , May vol. 8 no. 1 2001; (p. 31-54)
Examines the response of white women writers to the conditions of living and writing in Queensland before the social and cultural changes set in train by the Second World War. The article covers a range of women writers, with particular attention to Foott and Praed. Sees the principal themes pre-occupying these authors as "the colonial experience ... including the difficulty of finding a literary voice in a new land, a conflicted sense of place, the linking of masculinity with violence, and the promotion of racial purity."
y Louisa Atkinson and Her Novels Victor Crittenden , Canberra : Mulini Press , 1997 Z9590 1997 single work criticism
Writing from the Contact Zone : Fiction by Early Queensland Women Belinda McKay , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 30 no. 2 2004; (p. 53-70) Hibiscus and Ti-Tree : Women in Queensland 2009; (p. 30-45)
This paper examines 'some of the ways in which white women novelists also contributed powerfully to shaping the literary imaginative landscape through which Australian readers came to "know" Indigenous people, and the nature of inter-racial contact, in the period before the publication of writing by Indigenous women began to disrupt the textual terrain' (54). The focus is on the writing of women who grew up in rural Queensland and/or used Queensland as settings. The paper concludes that women writers, though presenting themselves as sympathetic and knowledgeable observers and spokespersons for Indigenous people, were 'active participants in the ongoing colonial projects of subjugating Indigenous people and managing perceptions of that process' (68).
James Calvert, Louisa Atkinson and the Plains of Promise : The Story Behind Louisa Atkinson's Last Novel Patricia Clarke , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Margin , April no. 77 2009; (p. 20-34)

Patricia Clarke argues that the Queensland scenes of Louisa Atkinson's novel Tressa's Resolve are 'clearly based on her husband's [James Calvert's] recollections of the harsh nature of the country he travelled over during his historic fifteen months journey to Port Essington [with Ludwig Leichhardt in 1844-45] and on his scepticism of the grandiose plans for settlement, particularly of the district that was deceptively named 'The Plains of Promise'.' (28)

y Louisa Atkinson and Her Novels Victor Crittenden , Canberra : Mulini Press , 1997 Z9590 1997 single work criticism
'The One Jarring Note' : Race and Gender in Queensland Women's Writing to 1939 Belinda McKay , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland Review , May vol. 8 no. 1 2001; (p. 31-54)
Examines the response of white women writers to the conditions of living and writing in Queensland before the social and cultural changes set in train by the Second World War. The article covers a range of women writers, with particular attention to Foott and Praed. Sees the principal themes pre-occupying these authors as "the colonial experience ... including the difficulty of finding a literary voice in a new land, a conflicted sense of place, the linking of masculinity with violence, and the promotion of racial purity."
Last amended 4 Jul 2006 13:08:21
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