Issue Details: First known date: 1994 1994
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

y Entangled Subjects : Indigenous/Australian Cross-Cultures Of Talk, Text, And Modernity Michèle Grossman , Netherlands : Rodopi , 2013 Z1938856 2013 single work criticism

'Indigenous Australian cultures were long known to the world mainly from the writing of anthropologists, ethnographers, historians, missionaries, and others. Indigenous Australians themselves have worked across a range of genres to challenge and reconfigure this textual legacy, so that they are now strongly represented through their own life-narratives of identity, history, politics, and culture. Even as Indigenous-authored texts have opened up new horizons of engagement with Aboriginal knowledge and representation, however, the textual politics of some of these narratives - particularly when cross-culturally produced or edited - can remain haunted by colonially grounded assumptions about orality and literacy.

Through an examination of key moments in the theorizing of orality and literacy and key texts in cross-culturally produced Indigenous life-writing, Entangled Subjects explores how some of these works can sustain, rather than trouble, the frontier zone established by modernity in relation to 'talk' and 'text'. Yet contemporary Indigenous vernaculars offer radical new approaches to how we might move beyond the orality-literacy 'frontier', and how modernity and the a-modern are productively entangled in the process. ' (Source: Angus & Robertson website www.angusrobertson.com.au)

Towards 'a Postcolonial Practice of Writing' Margaret Somerville , Fiona Probyn , 2004 single work interview
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 30 no. 1 2004; (p. 56-71)
This 'interview' is a dialogue 'woven together after a few months of email exchanges with Margaret Somerville in 2002' (p.56). In the discussion Somerville 'elaborates on her navigation through feminist, postcolonial and poststructuralist connections and disconnections, as well as her strategies for achieving an embodied sense of belonging in the Australian landscape.' (p.56)
Towards 'a Postcolonial Practice of Writing' Margaret Somerville , Fiona Probyn , 2004 single work interview
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 30 no. 1 2004; (p. 56-71)
This 'interview' is a dialogue 'woven together after a few months of email exchanges with Margaret Somerville in 2002' (p.56). In the discussion Somerville 'elaborates on her navigation through feminist, postcolonial and poststructuralist connections and disconnections, as well as her strategies for achieving an embodied sense of belonging in the Australian landscape.' (p.56)
y Entangled Subjects : Indigenous/Australian Cross-Cultures Of Talk, Text, And Modernity Michèle Grossman , Netherlands : Rodopi , 2013 Z1938856 2013 single work criticism

'Indigenous Australian cultures were long known to the world mainly from the writing of anthropologists, ethnographers, historians, missionaries, and others. Indigenous Australians themselves have worked across a range of genres to challenge and reconfigure this textual legacy, so that they are now strongly represented through their own life-narratives of identity, history, politics, and culture. Even as Indigenous-authored texts have opened up new horizons of engagement with Aboriginal knowledge and representation, however, the textual politics of some of these narratives - particularly when cross-culturally produced or edited - can remain haunted by colonially grounded assumptions about orality and literacy.

Through an examination of key moments in the theorizing of orality and literacy and key texts in cross-culturally produced Indigenous life-writing, Entangled Subjects explores how some of these works can sustain, rather than trouble, the frontier zone established by modernity in relation to 'talk' and 'text'. Yet contemporary Indigenous vernaculars offer radical new approaches to how we might move beyond the orality-literacy 'frontier', and how modernity and the a-modern are productively entangled in the process. ' (Source: Angus & Robertson website www.angusrobertson.com.au)

Last amended 14 Oct 2009 16:49:11
Subjects:
  • Coonabarabran area, Coonabarabran - Gilgandra - Coonamble area, Central West NSW, New South Wales,
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