8207140637992033359.jpg
This image has been sourced from online
y The Black Crusade single work   novel   horror   fantasy  
Is part of The Vile Files Richard Harland 2004 series - author novel
Issue Details: First known date: 2004 2004
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

This darkly comic story takes place in 1894, 'and tells of a Hungarian bank clerk, Basil Smorta, who falls hopelessly in lust with Volusia, aka 'the Australian Songbird'. He follows her across Europe in company with a group of Fundamental Darwinists led by Lord Malicide Sain. They pursue their 'Black Crusade' at first by cart and carriage, then in Ingel Brankel's Mobilator. One bizarre and gruesome adventure follows another. The Ordeal of the Five Senses in the monks' lavabo, the excruciating apotheosis of Brother Dragorian, the doting love of the Love-Vampires, the bomb-throwing police force of Orblast, the sleep-tranced villagers in Morbol Villica and the sarcophagus of the Great One, the legendary marquis himself.'

Source: Author website http://www.richardharland.net/ (Sighted 07/01/2010)

Australian Popular Medievalism

This text has been selected for the Australian Popular Medievalism dataset.
Reference: Direct
Importance: Low

Notes

  • 'Publisher's warning: reading The Black Crusade may cause feelings of nausea, blindness, loss of status and social embarrassment. Do not read this book on public transport, in crowded places or in the company of senior citizens. Do not read this book aloud. Do not read Chapter 6, Chapter 18 or Chapter 22 under any circumstances.' (Source: LibrariesAustralia)
  • Sequel to The Vicar of Morbing Vyle.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Mount Waverley, Ashwood - Mulgrave area, Melbourne South East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Chimaera Publications , 2004 .
      8207140637992033359.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online
      Extent: viii, 215p.p.
      Description: illus., map
      ISBN: 0975214306

Works about this Work

The Australian Horror Novel Since 1950 James Doig , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 112-127)
According to James Doig the horror genre 'was overlooked by the popular circulating libraries in Australia.' In this chapter he observes that this 'marginalization of horror reflects both the trepidation felt by the conservative library system towards 'penny dreadfuls,' and the fact that horror had limited popular appeal with the British (and Australian) reading public.' Doig concludes that there is 'no Australian author of horror novels with the same commercial cachet' as authors of fantasy or science fiction. He proposes that if Australian horror fiction wants to compete successfully 'in the long-term it needs to develop a flourishing and vibrant small press contingent prepared to nurture new talent' like the USA and UK small presses.' (Editor's foreword xii)
The Black Crusade by Richard Harland Garry P. Dalrymple , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Infinitas Newsletter , October vol. 15 no. 10 2006; (p. 3)

— Review of The Black Crusade Richard Harland 2004 single work novel
Shock, Horror, the Dark Side Wins Jason Nahrung , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 29 January 2005; (p. 6)

— Review of The Black Crusade Richard Harland 2004 single work novel
Shock, Horror, the Dark Side Wins Jason Nahrung , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 29 January 2005; (p. 6)

— Review of The Black Crusade Richard Harland 2004 single work novel
The Black Crusade by Richard Harland Garry P. Dalrymple , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Infinitas Newsletter , October vol. 15 no. 10 2006; (p. 3)

— Review of The Black Crusade Richard Harland 2004 single work novel
The Australian Horror Novel Since 1950 James Doig , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 112-127)
According to James Doig the horror genre 'was overlooked by the popular circulating libraries in Australia.' In this chapter he observes that this 'marginalization of horror reflects both the trepidation felt by the conservative library system towards 'penny dreadfuls,' and the fact that horror had limited popular appeal with the British (and Australian) reading public.' Doig concludes that there is 'no Australian author of horror novels with the same commercial cachet' as authors of fantasy or science fiction. He proposes that if Australian horror fiction wants to compete successfully 'in the long-term it needs to develop a flourishing and vibrant small press contingent prepared to nurture new talent' like the USA and UK small presses.' (Editor's foreword xii)
Last amended 23 Jun 2014 15:39:46
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  • Europe,
  • 1894
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