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Screen cap from promotional trailer
form y Love's Brother single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 2004 2004
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

A matchmaker finds Angelo a promising prospect for a wife in Southern Italy. Angelo sends her his handsomer, younger brother Gino's photograph. The marriage ceremony is performed with the bride (Rosetta) and Angelo still on separate continents. When the beautiful Rosetta arrives confusion reigns while she, Angelo, Gino, and Gino's fiance try to unravel who loves who.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

A Cultural Affair to Remember : Nostalgia, Whiteness and Migration in Love's Brother Jessica Carniel , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 3 no. 1 2009; (p. 93-105)
'Caught in what one reviewer described as an 'Italo-Australian Brigadoon' (Hall 2004), Love's Brother is largely removed from the socio-political context in which it is set and also that in which it was made. By placing Love's Brother back into this context, this article analyses the film's problematic representation of Australia's migrant past and its relationship to current issues regarding migration, memory, race and ethnicity. It focuses upon the political implications of nostalgia in imagining migrant narratives of the past, arguing that this reveals more about current attitudes to migrants and migration. Specifically, it examines how the film 'white-washes' elements of Italian Australian history in order to reflect the ethnic group's current standing in broader Australian society, as well as the possibilities and problems this may hold for newer migrant and refugee communities in contemporary Australia.'
Tinkering at the Borders : Lucky Miles and the Diasporic (No) Road Movie Catherine Simpson , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Diasporas of Australian Cinema 2009; (p. 29-40)
'During the late 1990s and early 2000s, independent political documentaries, including Clara Law's Letters to Ali (2004) and Tom Zubrycki's Molly and Mobarak (2003), contested the prevailing anti-asylum-seeker discourse in Australian media. Australian feature film-making, however, had been noticeably silent on this issue until the release of Michael James Rowland's debut, Lucky Miles (2007). This film revolves around the quest of three exiles to seek civilization, resist capture and survive in the desert after being abandoned by an Indonesian fishing vessel in remote Western Australia. Pursued by an Army Reservist unit that seems more interested in fishing and football than the (seemingly impossible) task of maintaining border integrity, the three exiles become more and more lost as they wander deeper into the desert.' (p. 29)
Growing Up Italian and Making Movies Jan Sardi , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literary and Social Diasporas : An Italian Australian Perspective 2007; (p. 59-64)
Growing Up Italian and Making Movies Jan Sardi , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literary and Social Diasporas : An Italian Australian Perspective 2007; (p. 59-64)
A Cultural Affair to Remember : Nostalgia, Whiteness and Migration in Love's Brother Jessica Carniel , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 3 no. 1 2009; (p. 93-105)
'Caught in what one reviewer described as an 'Italo-Australian Brigadoon' (Hall 2004), Love's Brother is largely removed from the socio-political context in which it is set and also that in which it was made. By placing Love's Brother back into this context, this article analyses the film's problematic representation of Australia's migrant past and its relationship to current issues regarding migration, memory, race and ethnicity. It focuses upon the political implications of nostalgia in imagining migrant narratives of the past, arguing that this reveals more about current attitudes to migrants and migration. Specifically, it examines how the film 'white-washes' elements of Italian Australian history in order to reflect the ethnic group's current standing in broader Australian society, as well as the possibilities and problems this may hold for newer migrant and refugee communities in contemporary Australia.'
Tinkering at the Borders : Lucky Miles and the Diasporic (No) Road Movie Catherine Simpson , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Diasporas of Australian Cinema 2009; (p. 29-40)
'During the late 1990s and early 2000s, independent political documentaries, including Clara Law's Letters to Ali (2004) and Tom Zubrycki's Molly and Mobarak (2003), contested the prevailing anti-asylum-seeker discourse in Australian media. Australian feature film-making, however, had been noticeably silent on this issue until the release of Michael James Rowland's debut, Lucky Miles (2007). This film revolves around the quest of three exiles to seek civilization, resist capture and survive in the desert after being abandoned by an Indonesian fishing vessel in remote Western Australia. Pursued by an Army Reservist unit that seems more interested in fishing and football than the (seemingly impossible) task of maintaining border integrity, the three exiles become more and more lost as they wander deeper into the desert.' (p. 29)
Last amended 10 Apr 2014 12:49:46
Settings:
  • Victoria,
  • 1950s
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