Sweet Water single work   essay  
Issue Details: First known date: 2003-2004 2003-2004
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Miller's novel Journey to the Stone Country is set in the Urannah Valley in Northern Queensland, this valley is under threat from a project to dam the waters of the valley. Miller argues that the preservation of the Urannah Valley is important to our Australian identity, our civilisation, and to the acknowledgement of cultural differences. He also argues that fiction is relevant in discussions of the important issues facing our society as it "explores the individual's relationship to the great moral questions of the day."

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y The Bulletin vol. 121 no. 6403 16 December - 13 January 2003-2004 Z1089176 2003-2004 periodical issue 2003-2004 pg. 100-104

Works about this Work

Disestablished Worlds : An Introduction to the Novels of Alex Miller Robert Dixon , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 1-28)
Continental Heartlands and Alex Miller’s Geosophical Imaginary Elizabeth McMahon , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 125-138)
This chapter examines 'how the alignment between geography and subjectivity operates in four of Miller's novels to identify his refiguration of the inherited map of modern identities.' (125)
McMahon focuses on The Ancestor Game (1992), Conditions of Faith (2000), Journey to the Stone Country (2002) and Landscape of Farewell (2007).
Old Testament Prophets and New Testament Saviours : Reading Retribution and Forgiveness towards Whiteness in Alex Miller’s Journey to the Stone Country Liliana Zavaglia , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 170-186)
'In Journey to the Stone Country (2002), Alex Miller explores a national history in a regional setting, mapping a literary path towards reconciliation between black and white on what we may consider - and what he himself has described - as a place sacred to both Indigenous and European dreaming ('Sweet Water', 104). Yet Journey to the Stone Country is not only a literary journey. Contained within the literary of Miller's intricately drawn fictional world is the literal, the lived experiences of the character's real-life counterparts, whose stories inform the reconciliatory movements of the novel.' (From author's introduction 170)
Disestablished Worlds : An Introduction to the Novels of Alex Miller Robert Dixon , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 1-28)
Continental Heartlands and Alex Miller’s Geosophical Imaginary Elizabeth McMahon , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 125-138)
This chapter examines 'how the alignment between geography and subjectivity operates in four of Miller's novels to identify his refiguration of the inherited map of modern identities.' (125)
McMahon focuses on The Ancestor Game (1992), Conditions of Faith (2000), Journey to the Stone Country (2002) and Landscape of Farewell (2007).
Old Testament Prophets and New Testament Saviours : Reading Retribution and Forgiveness towards Whiteness in Alex Miller’s Journey to the Stone Country Liliana Zavaglia , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 170-186)
'In Journey to the Stone Country (2002), Alex Miller explores a national history in a regional setting, mapping a literary path towards reconciliation between black and white on what we may consider - and what he himself has described - as a place sacred to both Indigenous and European dreaming ('Sweet Water', 104). Yet Journey to the Stone Country is not only a literary journey. Contained within the literary of Miller's intricately drawn fictional world is the literal, the lived experiences of the character's real-life counterparts, whose stories inform the reconciliatory movements of the novel.' (From author's introduction 170)
Last amended 18 Dec 2003 08:02:21
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