y Griffith Review periodical  
Date: 2003-
Issue Details: First known date: 2003-; Latest issue indexed: 2016 2003-
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Each issue will develop an important topical theme with writing from a range of genres and perspectives that will provide a unique literary conversation. Griffith Review aims to build a bridge between journalism, academic and literary writing in Australia.' (From: http://www58.gu.edu.au:4500/grifrev/index.php sighted 22/11/2003)

Notes

  • Quarterly.
  • Contents indexed selectively.
  • Online access to contents is available for subscribers at: http://www3.griffith.edu.au/01/griffithreview/home.php

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 2003-

Works about this Work

The Review of the Review Is Positive Phil Brown , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 20 October 2016; (p. 32)
'It seems like only yesterday, but it wasn’t. It was 2003 when journal Griffith Review (named after visionary former Queensland premier Sir Samuel Griffith)was launched. I can remember interviewing editor Julianne Schultz for the launch. It was a bright, sunny day and I recall that she was very enthusiastic, I was very enthusiastic and the vice-chancellor of Griffith University, Glyn Davis, was also enthusiastic. ...'
Magazine Never at a Loss for Words Phil Brown , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , Saturday 24 May 2014; (p. 19)

— Review of Griffith Review 2003- periodical (53 issues)
'As well as being a forum for ideas and fine Australian writing, the quarterly Griffith Reviewhas its practical uses. Just ask Brisbane author Melissa Lucashenko...'
In the Same Boat Emmett Stinson , 2013- single work criticism
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , March 2013;
'Discussions of the cultural cringe are now conducted in the past tense. Cringe-thinking, or so the contemporary narrative goes, can no longer function in a globalised, cosmopolitan, multicultural Australia where local literature circulates in an international milieu. This new literary internationalism is perhaps best exemplified by the designation of Melbourne as an UNESCO City of Literature in the 2008 and the subsequent founding of the Wheeler Centre for Books, Writing and Ideas, but evidence of Australian cultural bodies' increasing collaboration with foreign organisations can be found everywhere: the establishment of the 2012 conference NonfictioNow, which was a joint initiative of RMIT and the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop; the 2010 creation of if:book Australia, a collaborative venture between the Queensland Writers Centre and the international Institute for the Future of the Book; the 2012 recognition of Clunes as one of sixteen members of the International Organisation of Booktowns; Allen & Unwin's 2010 launch of an Australian version of the Faber Academy, which offers creative writing classes; and the recent announcement of a Melbourne chapter of Alain de Botton's School of Life, which will host literary events, offer 'bibliotherapy', and contain a bookshop run by local seller Readings.' (Author's introduction)
Rise of a Cultural Strategist Matthew Westwood , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 27 November 2012; (p. 15)
Not Quite a Novel Idea and It Works Well Linda Morris , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 5 December 2012; (p. 11)
Australian Literary Journals : Virtual and Social Benjamin Laird , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , December vol. 36 no. 2011;
'Twenty years ago, if you published a quarterly literary journal, you could be certain what that meant: four issues a year. In 2003, when Anna Hedigan wrote her overview of journals and their web presence not much had changed. The publishers' attitude to the online space was that it was essentially a placeholder for the print journal.

Genevieve Tucker's review four years later suggested many of the journals were becoming more sophisticated, with more content online and greater interest in design. Relevant to the 2007 review, RMIT publishing announced in September that it had partnered to "produce a comprehensive digital archive of Australia's most iconic literary and cultural journals". This initiative will provide full archives for a number of Australian literary journals.' (Author's introduction)
Growing Content James Bradley , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , December vol. 4 no. 11 2009; (p. 24-25)
James Bradley tracks the history of some of Australia's best known literary magazines as well as some late twentieth and early twenty-first century offerings. He notes the growing online presence of these journals, suggesting that this presence 'contains a vision of the future of the literary magazine, one that is inextricably bound up in the development of devices such as the Kindle and Apple's as-yet-unseen e-reader'.
Brain Food Phil Brown , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: Brisbane News , 17 - 23 January no. 619 2007; (p. 27)
In Xanadu Did Kubla Khan , A Stately Pleasure Dome Decree Frank Moorhouse , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 17-18 December 2006; (p. 16-19)
From personal experience, novelist Frank Moorhouse explores how the Gold Coast has captured the Australian literary imagination.
Griffith Review - Launching Australia's Newest Quarterly Julianne Schultz , Frank Moorhouse , Geraldine Doogue , 2003 single work essay
— Appears in: The Sydney Papers , Winter-Spring vol. 15 no. 3-4 2003; (p. 64-74)
Lest We Get Lost In That Grey Blanket Natasha Cica , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 25-26 October 2003; (p. 15)

— Review of Griffith Review 2003- periodical (53 issues)
Review of the Times Benjamin Law , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 20 December 2003; (p. 6)

— Review of Griffith Review 2003- periodical (53 issues); Griffith Review no. 2 Summer 2003-2004 periodical issue
Lest We Get Lost In That Grey Blanket Natasha Cica , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 25-26 October 2003; (p. 15)

— Review of Griffith Review 2003- periodical (53 issues)
Review of the Times Benjamin Law , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 20 December 2003; (p. 6)

— Review of Griffith Review 2003- periodical (53 issues); Griffith Review no. 2 Summer 2003-2004 periodical issue
Magazine Never at a Loss for Words Phil Brown , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , Saturday 24 May 2014; (p. 19)

— Review of Griffith Review 2003- periodical (53 issues)
'As well as being a forum for ideas and fine Australian writing, the quarterly Griffith Reviewhas its practical uses. Just ask Brisbane author Melissa Lucashenko...'
Griffith Review - Launching Australia's Newest Quarterly Julianne Schultz , Frank Moorhouse , Geraldine Doogue , 2003 single work essay
— Appears in: The Sydney Papers , Winter-Spring vol. 15 no. 3-4 2003; (p. 64-74)
Brain Food Phil Brown , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: Brisbane News , 17 - 23 January no. 619 2007; (p. 27)
Growing Content James Bradley , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , December vol. 4 no. 11 2009; (p. 24-25)
James Bradley tracks the history of some of Australia's best known literary magazines as well as some late twentieth and early twenty-first century offerings. He notes the growing online presence of these journals, suggesting that this presence 'contains a vision of the future of the literary magazine, one that is inextricably bound up in the development of devices such as the Kindle and Apple's as-yet-unseen e-reader'.
Australian Literary Journals : Virtual and Social Benjamin Laird , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , December vol. 36 no. 2011;
'Twenty years ago, if you published a quarterly literary journal, you could be certain what that meant: four issues a year. In 2003, when Anna Hedigan wrote her overview of journals and their web presence not much had changed. The publishers' attitude to the online space was that it was essentially a placeholder for the print journal.

Genevieve Tucker's review four years later suggested many of the journals were becoming more sophisticated, with more content online and greater interest in design. Relevant to the 2007 review, RMIT publishing announced in September that it had partnered to "produce a comprehensive digital archive of Australia's most iconic literary and cultural journals". This initiative will provide full archives for a number of Australian literary journals.' (Author's introduction)
In Xanadu Did Kubla Khan , A Stately Pleasure Dome Decree Frank Moorhouse , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 17-18 December 2006; (p. 16-19)
From personal experience, novelist Frank Moorhouse explores how the Gold Coast has captured the Australian literary imagination.
Rise of a Cultural Strategist Matthew Westwood , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 27 November 2012; (p. 15)
Not Quite a Novel Idea and It Works Well Linda Morris , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 5 December 2012; (p. 11)
In the Same Boat Emmett Stinson , 2013- single work criticism
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , March 2013;
'Discussions of the cultural cringe are now conducted in the past tense. Cringe-thinking, or so the contemporary narrative goes, can no longer function in a globalised, cosmopolitan, multicultural Australia where local literature circulates in an international milieu. This new literary internationalism is perhaps best exemplified by the designation of Melbourne as an UNESCO City of Literature in the 2008 and the subsequent founding of the Wheeler Centre for Books, Writing and Ideas, but evidence of Australian cultural bodies' increasing collaboration with foreign organisations can be found everywhere: the establishment of the 2012 conference NonfictioNow, which was a joint initiative of RMIT and the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop; the 2010 creation of if:book Australia, a collaborative venture between the Queensland Writers Centre and the international Institute for the Future of the Book; the 2012 recognition of Clunes as one of sixteen members of the International Organisation of Booktowns; Allen & Unwin's 2010 launch of an Australian version of the Faber Academy, which offers creative writing classes; and the recent announcement of a Melbourne chapter of Alain de Botton's School of Life, which will host literary events, offer 'bibliotherapy', and contain a bookshop run by local seller Readings.' (Author's introduction)
The Review of the Review Is Positive Phil Brown , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 20 October 2016; (p. 32)
'It seems like only yesterday, but it wasn’t. It was 2003 when journal Griffith Review (named after visionary former Queensland premier Sir Samuel Griffith)was launched. I can remember interviewing editor Julianne Schultz for the launch. It was a bright, sunny day and I recall that she was very enthusiastic, I was very enthusiastic and the vice-chancellor of Griffith University, Glyn Davis, was also enthusiastic. ...'

PeriodicalNewspaper Details

ISSN: 1448-2924
Last amended 4 Jan 2007 14:02:24
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